Show Posts
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6
31  International / Deutsch / Re: random Seed ohne analog read on: May 05, 2012, 03:42:01 am
Aref ist kein Output-pin und sollte damit trotz aller belegten Pins noch für eine externe Beschaltung zu gebrauchen sein.
32  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: ATmega 1280 in DIP? on: May 05, 2012, 03:34:28 am
But it is not like the ATmega1280 at all - they have the same flash memory, that is all the 128 in front tells you. The 1280 is part of the Mega*0 line, which has buttloads of ports and innumerable peripheral features not found on any DIP ATmega. The 1284 is part of the Mega*4 line, which is just a better version of the Mega16 and Mega32. But yes, it is the most powerful DIP ATmega out there, so it would indeed be the closest choice - just not a cousin.
33  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Internet vs Serial communication on: May 03, 2012, 01:53:05 pm
Ethernet is still serial, it just is not called that way explicitly. Just like I²C (the TWI protocol used by Arduino's wire lib) does not have serial in its name, despite being a serial protocol. I guess our usage of the term "serial port" goes back to the old PCs, which had a 'serial port' (using a UART, the same device that is used for Arduino's serial communications) and a 'parallel port' (an LPT port used for high-speed peripherals such as printers).
34  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Op Amps affecting ISP using attiny84 on: April 27, 2012, 04:27:15 pm
Mike, most OPs will not output a logic significantly lower than their negative supply voltage, which happens to be GND in this case. Yes, it would be dangerously stupid to do it with a dual supply, but with a single voltage supply, it is just bad design.
35  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Op Amps affecting ISP using attiny84 on: April 26, 2012, 10:32:23 am
Quote
Also, should you not include some sort of resistor divider between +5V and GND to put some DC bias on the OPs' inputs? And for that matter, a voltage higher than GND on the inverting amplifier's non-inverting input - because otherwise, it will not amplify well.

The input signal from the MIC is both positive and negative, so I'm using two OPs (one inverting and one non-inverting) to amplify the positive and negative "halves" of the signal. Then, I sum them in the microcontroller.

Quote
Why it works on breadboard?

I attempted the breadboard again and it didn't work (no idea what I did last time when it worked). I continued experimenting by placing a 10k pot on each SPI line and discovered that when any of the SPI pins are at ground or +5V, the programming doesn't work. But anything in between, everything works fine. If that holds true, then with no input, the non-inverting OP is holding the USCK line at ground which could be the issue. Thoughts on that?

Quote
use resistors in the range between (just an educated guess here) 220 and 4k7 Ohms. Between the OPs and the controller, that is

You mean like this:

https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/112970352885170654279/albums/5734988209816271265/5735484368544092146
Yep, the resistors go right there.
I wonder though, is there a reason you are using different amplifiers for each half-wave? As I said, with a DC bias, you could get the full wave through one amp and detect it with a single ADC channel. One difficulty might be increased high-pass frequency, but the right choice of resistors should offset that. Your system as it is is a bit non-linear actually. The non-inverting amp has a gain of 11, the inverting one a gain of 10.
And driving an op-amp input with a voltage of less than its low supply voltage might actually result in undefined behavior. The OP should pull the differential input voltage to almost zero, yes, but there still has to be a minuscule tad of voltage between the input pins, meaning the inverting input still has a voltage below GND. Have you checked the datasheet whether the amp still works? Have you tested the circuit?
36  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: Op Amps affecting ISP using attiny84 on: April 25, 2012, 01:46:28 pm
BAD! The OPs always drive the lines they are connected to. Why it works on breadboard? Maybe higher impedance on the collections that allows the SPI to drive the microcontroller inputs enough to register the programming, no idea otherwise.
Having resistors on the ISP interface only will not help you. You need the ISP and the microcontroller to drive the pins more strongly than the OPs, so you need some resistance between the OPs and the ISP. Keep in mind that resistors on analog lines might induce a noticable voltage drop, but since µCs commonly read 10k pots (whose maximum output impedance is 2.5k), it should be well if you use resistors in the range between (just an educated guess here) 220 and 4k7 Ohms. Between the OPs and the controller, that is.
Also, should you not include some sort of resistor divider between +5V and GND to put some DC bias on the OPs' inputs? And for that matter, a voltage higher than GND on the inverting amplifier's non-inverting input - because otherwise, it will not amplify well.
37  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Arduino Atmega Standalone - need for Capacitors & Crystal? on: February 24, 2012, 08:55:57 am
The internal clock is limited to half the speed that is usually present on Arduino and is subject to inaccuracies if you have not calibrated it. But yes, it can be used (with a bootloader adapted for it), but timing-dependent stuff like serial communications might be unreliable.
Similarly, the power supply filter capacitor is not necessary per se, but it is very useful and improves reliability.
38  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: OUTPUT PIN and LED on: February 18, 2012, 07:37:28 am
Well, there was an old Arduino NG revision that had an internal resistance on pin 13 instead of the on-board LED, but that was years ago.
39  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Can I connect USB when driving Arduino from an external supply? on: February 18, 2012, 07:32:39 am
USB power is disconnected if there is an external VIN supply. If you hook up an external supply directly to +5V, that circuit will probably not trigger.
40  International / Deutsch / Re: Prozentrechnung ! on: February 17, 2012, 12:28:44 pm
http://www.kowoma.de/gps/zusatzerklaerungen/Praezision.htm
Genau bedeutet laut der obigen Definition sowohl präzise als auch richtig. Natürlich sind Rundungsfehler und Überlauffehler immer noch präzise, aber da beides eben Fehler sind, sind sie nicht richtig, also auch nicht genau.
41  International / Deutsch / Re: Prozentrechnung ! on: February 17, 2012, 06:01:27 am
Also ich finde ja dass Mathematiker, wenn sie so Zeugs schreiben, mit F gleichzusetzen sind. smiley-lol
In dem Sinne, dass sie nicht dicht sind? Streng genommen heißt es ja auch dicht liegen. Aber wie sagt man noch so schön: Mathematiker sind konvergent. Beweis: Mathematiker sind monoton und beschränkt.
Und ja, auf Prozessoren ohne FPU sollte man Floats nur nehmen, wenn man sie braucht. Bei ints gibt es natürlich Rechenoperationen, bei denen man nennenswerte Rundungsfehler zu erwarten hat, aber die lassen sich meist auch durch geschickte Skalierung beheben.
42  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: OUTPUT PIN and LED on: February 17, 2012, 05:53:35 am
And even if your Arduino is not taking any noticable damage, your LED will. LEDs have explosively increasing current consumption above a certain voltage, so they must be run with a resistor.
43  International / Deutsch / Re: Prozentrechnung ! on: February 17, 2012, 03:03:48 am
Doch, floats sind reell und rational, da die Menge aller Werte für Floats (nennen wir sie einmal F) eine Teilmenge der rationalen Zahlen ist, welche wiederum eine Teilmenge der reellen Zahlen ist. Von daher bietet es sich an, für F die Definition der Quadratwurzel zu nehmen, die auf R und Q schon üblich ist, nur halt mit anschließender Näherung, um in den Wertebereich zu passen. Eine Näherung ist ja schon auf Q nötig für Zahlen wie sqrt(2), jedoch ist F nicht dicht, sodass die Approximation irgendwann auch mal zum Ende kommt.
Natürlich kann es aber sein, dass man beide Lösungen einer Quadratwurzel sucht oder nur die negative, das wird dann aber üblicherweise mit einem Vorzeichen vor der Wurzel dargestellt. Zumindest auf wohlgeordneten Mengen wir R, Q oder auch F, auf denen man klar definieren kann, was größer und was kleiner als 0 ist.

Aber ich bezweifle, dass diese Diskussion irgendetwas zum Thema beiträgt.
44  International / Deutsch / Re: Prozentrechnung ! on: February 15, 2012, 06:13:20 pm
@mkl0815: Dein Beispiel stimmt nicht. 11/2 liefert 5 mit 0% Fehler. Der 10% Fehler liegt in Deiner Annahme, daß da 5.5 rauskommen sollte. Bevor Du argumentierst, daß 11/2 doch immer gleich 5.5 sein muß, denke mal kurz darüber nach wie groß der Fehler bei sqrt(4) ist. 0 oder 200%?

 Auf was ich raus will: bevor man von Fehlern redet muß man erst einmal schauen was denn das erwartete Ergebnis sein soll.
Die Quadratwurzel einer reellen Zahl ist aber als diejenige -positive- Zahl definiert, dessen Quadrat der Radikand ist. Von daher ist -2 KEINE Lösung von sqrt(2).

Und wenn du gebrochene Zahlen darstellen willst, dann packst du ja auch noch einen Skalierungsfaktor dazu. Wenn du dich mit floats im untersten Wertebereich aufhälts gibt es da auch Rundungsfehler.
45  International / Deutsch / Re: Arduino externe Stromversorgung und PC-Verbindung zwecks Seriellen Monitors on: February 15, 2012, 06:09:55 pm
Alle Boards die eine Buchse für externe Spannungsversorgung und einen USB-Anschluss haben, sollten mit einem Schalter, einem Jumper oder einer Schaltung zum automatischen Wechsel zwischen Spannungsquellen ausgestattet sein.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6