Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Old Computer Parts - Useful? on: September 13, 2012, 02:27:43 pm
Keep any old trackball mouses you may have for encoders. Old printers usually have nice motors and encoders too that are great for small robots.

What is an encoder?
2  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Old Computer Parts - Useful? on: September 11, 2012, 03:33:53 pm

Awesome smiley-grin I'm looking forward to it. Is there any parts that I should be afraid to touch? Like heavy metals (mercury, cadmium etc)

Only if you take apart a CRT monitors- the CRT can retain high voltage for a long time.  It's not the voltage that hurts, it's the reflex from being shocked that can cause you to knock or drop the CRT on your toe that hurts the most.

Nearly every parts on computer boards have very little, if any, toxic chemical. Usually the lead (in solder mostly) is the worst of all and it's easily dealt with.

Awesome. You've all been a great help.
3  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Old Computer Parts - Useful? on: September 10, 2012, 07:16:36 pm
I have an old XT clone case that I swear I'm going to use for something some day. LOL It weighs about 300 kilos.

I just used an old PC power supply case to house the guts of my Arduino project. I also salvaged an old mouse to use for switches on my project. It had a serial connector on it. I got some nicer switches now.

There's gold in them piles.  smiley-lol

Awesome. I'm really excited.

Can anyone share any tips for removing various components? I know there is such a tool called the Solder sucker, can anyone recommend a good type/brand?
4  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Old Computer Parts - Useful? on: September 10, 2012, 06:03:30 am
Hi,
    There will be lots thats useful - cables, connectors, switches, capacitors, CD Rom motors and sensors etc

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com

Awesome smiley-grin I'm looking forward to it. Is there any parts that I should be afraid to touch? Like heavy metals (mercury, cadmium etc)
5  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Old Computer Parts - Useful? on: September 10, 2012, 01:51:06 am
Hey Forums,

I've had my Adruino now for a year and a bit and unfortunately due to space constraints in my home I haven't really been able to dive into the world of Arduino hacking, however that is about to change. I am moving into a bigger house soon where my family assures me I will get a "robot room". I'm very excited. And so I come to you now with a fairly straight forward question. I have through the course of my life acquired lots of computer parts. Old motherboards, cpus, cases, power supplies, cdroms, speakers, keyboards, wires... lots and lots of wires! and I'd like to know if it's worth while keeping this stuff for future use or whether or not I should be giving it away/recycling it. As we are now in the process of packing up and moving our belongings into our new home it occurred to me that some of these old computer parts might actually not be useful in anyway to me anymore, some may even be harmful (due to hazardous materials). The computer parts age in ranges from the days of Pentium III-450mhz till current. So 1998? I don't quite recall when I began collecting all these all parts but I do know that my first computer was a PIII-450 and I still have it and it still runs!

So any advice you have will be greatly appreciated smiley-grin
6  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: How do you check the Length of an Array? on: February 04, 2012, 09:16:18 pm
In the case of dynamic arrays, to expand an existing populated array I must make a new array at the larger proportions then copy the old elements into the new, swap ppointers and destroy the old array?

Yes, that appears to be the case.
7  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: How do you check the Length of an Array? on: February 04, 2012, 08:48:32 pm
Well, this whole conversation has gone well over my head in terms of what I can personally relate to, but I get that the general answer is that there isn't a simple function I can call that will return the number of indexes in an Array.

I'm glad people are having good discussion.

I'm sure I will have many more questions soon. Going from a very high level language such as PHP to ... whatever it is that Arduino uses (it's C right?) certainly has it's challenges. I'm only just beginning to realize how much processing power and ram a modern day web server actually has. Kind of boggles my mind!
8  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: How do you check the Length of an Array? on: February 04, 2012, 05:43:36 am
Would there not ever be a time where you would want to add things into an array during Run Time?

I'm still just starting out with Arduino but I have a php programming background.

I'm going through this lesson booklet I have and the one I'm currently on was to set up 8 blinking LEDs.
As the lesson book suggested I stored them in an array

Code:
int ledPins[] = {2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9}

Then in the set program it suggests to loop through them like this

Code:
void setup()
{
  for(int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
  {
    pinMode(ledPins[i], OUTPUT);
  }
}

Whereas I, in PHP would done something like

Code:
void setup()
{
  for(int i = 0; i < sizeof(ledPins); i++)
  {
    pinMode(ledPins[i], OUTPUT);
  }
}

Like I said, I'm still starting out and just trying to get used to the language so I'm not actually sure if there would ever be a case where an Array might grow beyond it's declared size during run time but I figured this would be common.
9  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: How do you check the Length of an Array? on: February 04, 2012, 05:14:29 am
So you must always keep track of it's length with another variable then?
10  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / How do you check the Length of an Array? on: February 04, 2012, 05:02:16 am
I was just curious if there was a way to check the length of an array?

I didn't see any direct answers to this on the forums and the Array function page on the website didn't say anything about checking the length either.

I was hoping to see something like sizeof(array_name), but sizeof() doesn't work that way with Arduino does it?
11  Community / Website and Forum / Re: Update my Email Address on: February 03, 2012, 05:46:44 am
Thank you very much. Now I may receive notification emails again! Yay!
12  Community / Website and Forum / [FAQ] Update my Email Address on: January 31, 2012, 03:06:48 am
I feel a bit like a fool but I can't seem how to change my registered Email address. When I got to the Email and Notifications section it doesn't give me a field where I could adjust my email address. Is it somewhere else?
13  General Category / General Discussion / Suggestions on how can I hire someone who knows Arduino in my area? on: January 31, 2012, 03:04:41 am
I'm from Vancouver Island, Bc, Canada.

I've already tried Craigslist. Haven't had much luck but I just re-posted there.

I'm basically looking for someone who can school me DIY Electronics.

Any other ideas? I figured maybe there might be a section here in the forums but I can't seem to find one.
14  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Controlling AC Fan Speed based upon Temperature on: January 30, 2012, 03:57:35 am
Hey Forums,

** Preamble (ignore this if you want to) **

I'm trying to get into Arduino hacking. I'm quite the noob with electronics but I am a web programmer by trade. I write mostly in PHP, Mysql and Javascript but once in a while I have to do some HTML/CSS as well. At any rate, I'm familiar with code and I have completed a 10 step tutorial booklet that came with my Arduino kit. My kit contains a bunch of motors, breadboard, temperature sensor and some other little gizmos that were part of a great introduction to electronics and the Arduino. So I have some stuff already. This is what I purchased (http://www.canakit.com/arduino-professional-kit.html)

** Actual topic **

I'd like to build my brother a simple system that controls a fan on his heating system. It should be a fairly simple project. Based upon a certain temperature I want to be able to turn on an AC fan. The fan is fairly low wattage (http://www.princessauto.com/pal/product/0772889/Single-Speed/8%22-Duct-Booster-Fan). The only part right now that I'm confused about is how do I piece this all together?

1. What do I put the Arduino actually in? Is there some common Arduino housings that people use?
2. What Power Source will I need to use? Can I use 1 power source for the Arduino and the Fan?
3. How do I switch on 120v devices? Is there a simple cheap relay that would work for this?
4. How will I adjust when I want the fan to come on (like at what temp) and would I see what temperature it is. Would I need and LCD screen? Buttons to modify some settings?

I know there will be many solutions to each part so I'm just asking you to let me know how would you do all of this and why.

I thank yee in advanced.

15  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Electric water/pipe valve? on: March 16, 2011, 10:56:02 pm
Quote
Alternatively have you considered simply turning off the pump

Turning off the pump unfortunately will allow water to trickle back through the pump.

Use a check-valve (you make one for a few cents). 
Or use a different kind of pump that prevents back- (or forward) flow.
The combination of a low-performance pump and an electrically-operated valve is going to be difficult to resolve.

Aye I agree. I'm gonna abandon the water pump idea and try the motors with the threaded rods instead. Thanks for replying smiley
Pages: [1] 2 3 4