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301  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Need Help With Stage Lighting Set Up! on: September 03, 2011, 03:03:36 am
I'm a newb myself but I've put a bit of thought into an idea very similar. Your first problem is that each bulb acting independently(trailing to the end) would need it's own relay. Even if you made each strand match eachother that's still a lot if relays. You might want to consider how you could do it with LEDs and make things immensely easier on yourself.
302  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Resistors for this PIR sensor on: September 01, 2011, 03:18:15 pm
I just figured hooking it up to the analog would tell me how high the high was and how low the low was so I could be sure it wasn't giving me a signal that could become confused.

The resistor to the digital pin was just because I was afraid to fry something and they showed it on the data sheet.

I'll use the 20k to ground if you say that's how it should be done. Thanks.
303  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Resistors for this PIR sensor on: September 01, 2011, 03:43:11 am
So I got this Panasonic PIR sensor(EKMC1601113) and I was super relieved at how easy it was to get working but now I want to be sure I'm doing it as well as possible. As a digital input it works perfectly and as analog it seems to go between 0 and 1000. That seems pretty close to both ends like I would imagine it should be but I still want to be sure I'm doing it right. I'm using a 100kohm resistor to pull down to ground and a 10kohm resistor to connect to the arduino inputs. I pretty much just guessed there, is there a more efficient way of deciding those values?

thanks
304  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Slow discharge, bad for atmega328? on: July 27, 2011, 03:50:05 am
Excellent, thank you
305  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Slow discharge, bad for atmega328? on: July 27, 2011, 02:10:47 am
A pot. Does that affect your answer?
306  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Slow discharge, bad for atmega328? on: July 27, 2011, 12:21:04 am
Quote
A what?
A trimmer

Quote
One second is a long time, though.
Yep. I'd say at the very least 2/3 of a second.

Quote
Are you referring to the Arduino (no, it's fine), or the wallwart (it's likely fine, too)?
I was referring to the ATmega328, as the subject line reads. So if it(the atmega) is ok then thats good news. Thanks.  smiley-wink
307  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Slow discharge, bad for atmega328? on: July 26, 2011, 06:35:09 pm
I have a standalone atmega328p connected to a wallwart through a 7805 voltage regulator. The atmega is directly powering 6 20mA LEDs and nothing else, just reading a trimmer. I have it plugged into a remote wall socket to directly cut the power and I noticed it take about a second for the wallwart to discharge and turn off the atmega. I assume the current is slowly decreasing in this time.  Is this bad for it? Is there anything I should do to improve it?

Thanks
308  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: 595 shiftout capacitor on: July 17, 2011, 04:20:09 am
Thanks guys... Can I ask then, is this tutorial wrong also about the two capacitors on the oscillator pins of the atmega?

http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Standalone
309  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Best way to switch off this power supply on: July 16, 2011, 06:25:57 am
I'll give that a try. Thanks.
310  Using Arduino / General Electronics / 595 shiftout capacitor on: July 16, 2011, 05:55:19 am
I'm using this tutorial to use my shift registers. The text says to use a 0.1"f capacitor on the latch pin and the schematic image says 1uf. I've been searching for the past hour or two for another example that includes a capacitor but I can't find anything. What am I supposed to use?

thanks
311  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Best way to switch off this power supply on: July 14, 2011, 03:21:01 am
I'm working on a Nixie Tube clock and I plan on having it switch off at certain times. I was originally just going to send an unusable code to the decoder to turn them off until I just realized the little neon lamps are directly wired to the +170v. I was thinking it would just be more efficient to switch off the power supply to take care of the nixies and the lamps at the same time. I am using this 555 timer power supply. It will be supplying about 17-20ma but I wasn't sure if the power supply itself uses up more current. I was wondering what the proper way of switching off this PSU would be. I figured I could just cut the +12v but I wasn't exactly sure what things I need to consider to decide how I do that.

Thanks
312  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Do I need a resistor for these nixie tubes? on: July 11, 2011, 04:42:20 pm
Thank you
313  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Do I need a resistor for these nixie tubes? on: July 11, 2011, 04:39:06 pm
So for 170v I'm wanting 68Kohm? does that sound correct?
314  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Do I need a resistor for these nixie tubes? on: July 11, 2011, 04:29:54 pm
The "rated current" is "2.5mA (0.3mA for DPs)" But that's the only info I can find. Is that what I'm looking for or do I need to keep searching?
315  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Do I need a resistor for these nixie tubes? on: July 11, 2011, 04:20:52 pm
Ok. So although I have the correct voltage, I need to limit the current? How do I choose a value of resistor? I only see info on calculating for LEDs.
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