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1  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Monitoring and control network Node types on: March 07, 2011, 10:31:25 pm
I sent you a PM about a new forum I'm running for this network.

Got it.  Thanks ... checking it out right now.  -j
2  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Monitoring and control network Node types on: March 07, 2011, 01:00:26 pm

Quote
I'm just throwing these out there... kinda brainstorming.
Good to hear it and thanks. I'm in the process of designing an evaluation board with about 10 Nodes, a protocol analyser, network PSU and a master controller. They will all be connected on the PCB for easy debugging but also be able to be snapped off so the various bits can be used over wires.  

Sounds great!  I think you're doing some innovative things.

I'm new to this board, but I'll keep an eye out here and at your website for any of your updates.

John
3  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Monitoring and control network Node types on: March 07, 2011, 11:28:26 am
All ideas welcome.

Hi Rob,

For ideas of different sensors, there's lots of them over at Seeed Studio:
   http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/sensors-c-144.html

On a more general note...

Are these your IO Nodules, as described on your web site?
So they will have an I2C interface?

I happened to stumble upon your web site yesterday, and this ION idea is very cool.
Basically a digital sensor, something I've been thinking about for a while.

Here are some other ideas I have:

  - make the electrical interface more generic, supporting:
         a) basic sensors, like above (polling using I2C) (good for bus network layout)
         b) interrupt ability, avoids polling, sometimes helpful
         c) full two way communication (using SPI) (good for point-to-point network layout)
    the idea is to have the interface support simple devices (sensors)
    and also complication devices (other processors, with a fast, 2-way interface)

 - define the physical specs of the nodule, so there is a physical "plug-n-play"

 - software library is designed such that talking to a rotary encoder (for example),
   via a nodule is no different from talking to an encoder locally connected to a processor
   (allows someone to prototype using these digital sensors, then move to using
    the same types of sensors connected directly to the main processor (for production, to lower cost),
    without having to re-write their code, just need to modify the configuration)

- have a generic way to define the messages passed between nodule and main processor
  (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remote_procedure_call).
  Makes for a powerful system:
      - can support multiple languages to talk to the nodules using code generation techniques
        (C, C++, Perl, Python, VB.net, Javascript, etc...)
      - can query nodule about it's capabilities and then build an interface dynamically at run time
        (imagine: web page that automatically updates, showing all nodules plugged in, and their current status)
      - code to control and monitor, say a GPS unit from company X, is exactly the same as a GPS unit from company Y,
        assuming they follow the same interface

Ok, there's enough ideas for now. :-)

I'm just throwing these out there... kinda brainstorming.

Microcontrollers have gotten so cheap ($0.50) that, to me, it makes
sense to make all these dumb devices a lot smarter, especially for
prototyping or one-off projects.

cheers, John
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