Show Posts
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]
46  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Newbie question: how to build a valid circuit on: May 04, 2011, 08:31:49 am
This one is valid ((Copyright infringment removed by administrator))

Not telling you what to do or nuthin', but please seed
47  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Newbie question: how to build a valid circuit on: May 04, 2011, 08:22:07 am
Thanks for the recommendation, guys.

Hey OP, ((Copyright infringment removed by administrator))
48  Topics / Science and Measurement / Re: Brewing thermostat on: May 03, 2011, 09:53:45 pm
You can't get more classical history than brewing your own beer. Much like killing an antelope with a stick you sharpened on a rock and eating it raw...... well maybe not that dramatic, but you get the point  smiley-razz
49  Topics / Science and Measurement / Re: Brewing thermostat on: May 03, 2011, 09:27:49 pm
First of all, you have no need for genius to brew with all grain. It's the oldest form of brewing there is and quite simple. I made a video of me brewing an all grain batch that many people really enjoyed, but google just removed it along with all the other videos they hosted. As soon as I find another host I will upload it and post the link here (It's too big for youtube, apparently) so you can see just how easy it is. With your shed being so cold you should brew a lager. Being here in the states we have to build things or buy gadgets for freezers to brew lagers. Brew a couple lagers and forget about them. Go about your ale making and in a few months you'll have homebrewed perfection waiting on. I can't be much help with electronics as I am here to learn from the very beginning almost, but as far as brewing I'll help you any way I can. Also, if you really want one of those heaters I'll ship you a couple. Is it crazy expensive to ship or something? I'm not even worried about you paying me for them. I think I can spare $1.25  smiley-grin, it's the shipping that might scare me.

You were talking about boxing your whole thing up, google "son of a fermentation chamber". Instead of cooling, just change the chillings bits to heating bits. Super cheap and easy to build.

Edit:Holy crap! It appears the video is still up for the moment! Enjoy!
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8400604593450308344#

50  Topics / Science and Measurement / Re: Brewing thermostat on: May 03, 2011, 06:57:44 am
I'm a homebrewer too, and plan on a project like this soon. Rather than arduino-ify the fermentation portion of the process, I am leaning more towards the mash. American science surplus has these cool little heaters from coffee pots right now and they are dirt cheap (2 for $1.25) I got 4 or them and plan on pump the mash liquor around them (in copper tubing of course) to give me a fully programmable and consistent step up and possibly even programmable decotion mashing.  How about an update? How's it working for you?

The heaters I was talking about http://www.sciplus.com/recommend.cfm/recommendid/4157

My plan is to use this relay http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10636 with a pot to adjust pwm in to the relay. I'll be using one of these http://www.sparkfun.com/products/250 to monitor temperature and would very much like to add my http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10168 to the project for visual feedback since it's doing little more than occupying space in my parts box right now. But, as of now this project is beyond my capability.

It does seem easy enough, I just have to learn , ie get these guys to help me, to do it.

What a great site, I love this place! Who needs school when you got all these brilliantly deviant minds in one spot on teh interwebz?

 
51  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: May 01, 2011, 03:21:18 pm
I think I can manage that  smiley-cool
52  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: May 01, 2011, 12:01:43 pm
I have uno and I also have an extra micro-controller for it, since I'm prone to cook such things.
53  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: May 01, 2011, 09:26:00 am
Which one did you get? I accidentally got the I2C one, and it is awful (slow). Hope you got a parallel DAC!
http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9719 the one you posted. I haven't actually ordered it, but it's in my cart. I'm hoping they will have the makerbeam back in stock soon and then I will go ahead with my order. As of now my cart is right by the register, but I'm waiting on that finally toy to be back in stock.
54  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: May 01, 2011, 07:49:36 am
You could make a function generator with a uC and a DAC. You store
the waveforms in wavetables (C arrays) and then periodically output
the values from the wavetable to the DAC. You can generate any arbitrary
periodic waveform. One name for this is a numerically-controlled
oscillator (NCO)

I make a board (NB1A) that integrates a '328 (Arduino bootloader)
and a DAC. I have a NCO sketch at http://wiblocks.luciani.org/docs/app-notes/nb1a-nco.html
You could wire the same DAC to an Arduino. The schematic is in
the NB1A datasheet http://wiblocks.luciani.org/NB1/NB1A-index.html

(* jcl *)

Well, I did order a DAC, and you guys are gonna have to teach me to play with it.
55  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: May 01, 2011, 07:48:38 am
Wouldn’t it be easier, and functionally identical, if you simply drew out various waveforms on small sheets of graph paper, and placed those sheets of paper individually over the top of the screen of the oscilloscope every time you want to look at one of the likely waveforms. In fact, if it were done like a flick book, you could have various flick books for sine, square, triangle, sawtooth, ramp. The flick-books could range from low frequency to high frequency as you flick through. Or other flick books could range from 1% to 99% symmetry. If you encounter a waveform you particularly like, you could photocopy that page and frame it and hang it on the wall along with your other favourite waveforms.
I actually did this first. Sadly, I spilled coffee on it and can't seem to find the motivation to do it again. Also, I kept getting distracted from drawing waveforms in favor of the masturbating stick man. *sigh*, what a character that stick man was  smiley-cry

Even if I were to find the motivation to start that project over again, It would be very difficult, as I have broken all my pencils pencil fighting.
56  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: April 30, 2011, 09:18:50 pm
Quote
I'm trying to get help for my problem but like most addicts I love it too much.
Then try the op amp version. Sparkfun free!

Too late, read the edit :^|
57  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: April 30, 2011, 09:02:35 pm
If you are willing, you can shell out $10 for a DAC and make some wave forms. Note that they won't be perfect. (but it is easier)

http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9719

But if you want better waveforms, check out this:

http://www.falstad.com/circuit/e-index.html

these are great circuit simulations. (check all of them out!) Scroll about half way until you see "Op-Amps" and then "Oscillators." That should help!


Good Luck!
baum
Thanks, baum. You should know that I have a problem with SparkFun, though. I'm trying to get help for my problem but like most addicts I love it too much.

Edit: Great site! I actually came across that one in my searches but didn't really check it out. Bookmarked now!

I also ordered the DAC, lol, Imma go broke.
58  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Building a function generator on: April 30, 2011, 08:58:09 pm
Thanks for the reply. I am also building a rodin coil and would like to experiment with all waveforms. But most of all I would like to learn something I can apply to other projects. I have one of the sparkfun function generator kits in my cart but I can't decide on whether I should spend the $35 on what is probably a pretty nice little unit, or try to build one myself. You're right, I should do both :^D

I really don't have an specifications, persey. As I said in my first post, I have this brand new oscilloscope and it's begging me to generate some functions.

Here's the oscilloscope I got http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9484 I can't figure out to link it properly, sorry.
59  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Building a function generator on: April 30, 2011, 08:12:18 pm
Contrary to popular opinion, google is not always your friend. I've been googling like crazy trying to find schematics to build a function generator. I did see the one that is arduino based that consists of nothing more than resistors attached to the digital pins, but I want a standalone unit. I also saw several that were based on various ic's that were made for wave generation, none of which I have. I have most of the basic bits and pieces laying around to build one, I just don't know how. I have a quad op-amp and a couple 555's, plenty of resistors and capacitors, switches and potentiometers. Can you guys please help me build one so I can learn something and see something besides a square wave on my brand new oscilloscope?

I'll sacrifice as many of what ever animals I have to, in order to appease you guys.
60  Using Arduino / Displays / Re: displaying sensor readings with the nokia 5110 on: April 26, 2011, 08:03:45 pm
Hi guys, new to the board and this is my first post.

I kinda sorta maybe just a little bit have the same problem, not exactly, though. I do indeed have the nokia 5110 from SparkFun and I would like to display a number representing some input from a sensor. At first I only want to use a hall sensor since the documentation for these are fairly abundant and straightforward. I would like the value to be a float, if that's possible. I'm brand new to Arduino and barely self taught in electronics. I'm not building this right away as I'm still trying to read all I will need to know to make it happen. Simply put, I want to have the lcd display a float variable based on input from a hall sensor or, ultimately, a read/write head from a salvaged hdd. If you guys could rate such a project's difficulty on a scale from 1 to 10 with 10 being like troubleshooting the large hadron collider and 1 being like hooking a led to a battery, where would it fall?

I'm not afraid to read, so links to docs help a lot. I have searched around a bit but find it a bit overwhelming to wade through what I need versus what I don't. Would you guys be agreeable to helping me build such a thing? 

Maybe my question isn't so different from op's, but I think I'm looking for a more general answer about how this is done.

Thanks in advance and peace!
Pages: 1 2 3 [4]