Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 50
1  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: 3w RGB LED heatsink pad connections? on: September 18, 2014, 07:43:21 pm
Thanks for the help. The only thing is I will have to make 3 separate heat sink pads since I'm connecting the 3 LED'son the board  in series, I guess?

Yep.

// Per.
2  Topics / Device Hacking / Re: New To Arduino . Can I make a laser trip line print? on: September 18, 2014, 07:42:57 pm
As other suggested, use a LDR that gets covered when the ball runs by.

Use a sketch on your Arduino that makes it emulate a keyboard, and make it send the keypress <CTRL+P> followed by <ENTER> and then connect this to an old laptop, connected to the printer via cable or wifi, with a document or image, showing what you want printed on the page.

// Per.
3  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: 3w RGB LED heatsink pad connections? on: September 18, 2014, 07:18:35 pm
I have not been able to find information from the manufacturer of your LED, but on all Lumileds, the Heatsink pad needs to be floating, and connecting it to either Cathode or Anode will hurt the LED over time.

So make a big copper-fill for heatsinking, but do not connect to any of the other terminals.

// Per.
4  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: How to use a Protection Circuit board? on: September 18, 2014, 05:54:23 am
Almost all Protection boards i have seen, defaults to be in "protected" state when the cell is connected. You need to connect a charge voltage on the P-terminals to "wake" it up. Around 4 volts that is.

// Per.
5  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Is This code elegant? on: September 16, 2014, 02:18:59 am
Many thanks to all who responded . I shall try and implement the tips and suggestions given, and hope that I can write better code.

Then go and Modify your first post. Mark up your sketch, press the #-button - click Save and it's fixed.

// Per.
6  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: New YwRobot MB102 power module overheats on: September 15, 2014, 01:42:32 pm
Gents, I had experienced the same overheating of the 5V regulator, including complete failure.
After reading the spec sheet I noted a comment that the chip is prone to fail if the input voltage
greater than the output voltage .That is the case when the unit is powered by the 3-pin connector.
I soldered a 1N2002 from the output of the 5V regulator to the input of that regulator (anode on
the output).  Have modified four of these modules with no failures or overheating.  Give it a try
if you have a unit lying around.

I think you meant the other way around smiley-grin

Practically all regulators cannot tolerate their output is more than 0,3V higher than the input, as it reverse-biases the unit, and will surely hurt it.

// Per.
7  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: QTouch IC (Pic Heavy) on: September 15, 2014, 11:00:55 am
And what is your question ? You show a working setup.

// Per.
8  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Is This code elegant? on: September 15, 2014, 10:57:51 am
Thanks!! Your response much appreciated!!

I'll bear that in mind and attempt to make it more readable!!

Then why don't you go and edit your post, and add the #code tags ?!

// Per.
9  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: Floppy organ ? on: September 13, 2014, 11:20:58 am
Is google not working for you?

Look at MrSolidSnake's youtube site (the one you posted a video from)

It is an Arduino sketch he is using.

// Per.
10  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Truck GPS Data Trasmitter on: September 11, 2014, 07:54:35 am
Put a better antenna on your SIM900 module!

// Per.
11  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Arduino Uno and ESC Power Source on: September 11, 2014, 07:37:41 am
Usually the ESC has a built-in BEC or SBEC that regulates your battery-voltage down to 5 or 6 volts.

This power goes trough the servo-lead that controls the ESC - this normally powers your radio-receiver and steering servo.

If it outputs no more than 5.5V, you can connect it to the Arduino's 5V-pin without any issues. If it is more like 6V, put a standard silicon diode (4002, 4004, 4007, not important) in series to drop about 0.7V, and then wire this to the 5V-pin.

// Per.
12  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Wiring Capacitors in Series on: September 10, 2014, 05:14:00 pm
If you have 0.1V at the output at the IR-receive, it requires a pullup-resistor. That's why it is there.

Try the circuit i suggested!

// Per.
13  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Wiring Capacitors in Series on: September 09, 2014, 06:12:35 pm
I didn't calculate the resistor.

When doing stuff that needs a pullup resistor, i just grab a 1K or 10K resistor, whatever is closest - it's not important.

I cannot recommend any books, as i'm self taught.

// Per.
14  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Wiring Capacitors in Series on: September 09, 2014, 05:34:52 pm
Well, you need to learn how electronics work, before going further.

I have drawn up a schematic of how you should wire the items to work.

This is as simple as it gets.

The 10K pullup-resistor is not critical. Anything from 1K to 10K will probably do nicely. If the sound of the buzzer is very low, try making the 10K resistor a smaller value, but not under 470 ohms, otherwise you may damage the IR-receiver.

// Per.
15  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: water screen-as do ? on: September 07, 2014, 09:06:20 am
The thing pictured on the video is just a wall of water running down, with a bog-standard projector projecting on it. nothing new or special.

// Per.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 50