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76  Community / Website and Forum / translate error un the french FAQ on: August 14, 2011, 01:24:09 pm
Hello,

in the french FAQ (link : http://arduino.cc/fr/Main/DebuterFAQ )
this :
Quote
(...) est ensuite directement passez à une compilateur (...)

sounds very bad in french, and have a fault. I suggest to replace by :

Quote
(...) est ensuite passé directement à un compilateur (...)

I can't correct it myself, so thanks to moderators for correct it.


ps: sorry if my english is bad, my french is a bit better smiley-wink


77  International / Français / Re: OneWire.h manquant ? on: August 08, 2011, 12:26:33 pm
Code:


//
// You need to use this function to start a search again from the beginning.
// You do not need to do it for the first search, though you could.
//
void OneWire::reset_search()
{
    uint8_t i;
    
    searchJunction = -1;
    searchExhausted = 0;
    for( i = 7; ; i--) {
address[i] = 0;
if ( i == 0) break;
    }
}

//
// Perform a search. If this function returns a '1' then it has
// enumerated the next device and you may retrieve the ROM from the
// OneWire::address variable. If there are no devices, no further
// devices, or something horrible happens in the middle of the
// enumeration then a 0 is returned.  If a new device is found then
// its address is copied to newAddr.  Use OneWire::reset_search() to
// start over.
//
uint8_t OneWire::search(uint8_t *newAddr)
{
    uint8_t i;
    char lastJunction = -1;
    uint8_t done = 1;
    
    if ( searchExhausted) return 0;
    
    if ( !reset()) return 0;
    write( 0xf0, 0);
    
    for( i = 0; i < 64; i++) {
uint8_t a = read_bit( );
uint8_t nota = read_bit( );
uint8_t ibyte = i/8;
uint8_t ibit = 1<<(i&7);

if ( a && nota) return 0;  // I don't think this should happen, this means nothing responded, but maybe if
// something vanishes during the search it will come up.
if ( !a && !nota) {
   if ( i == searchJunction) {   // this is our time to decide differently, we went zero last time, go one.
a = 1;
searchJunction = lastJunction;
   } else if ( i < searchJunction) {   // take whatever we took last time, look in address
if ( address[ ibyte]&ibit) a = 1;
else {                            // Only 0s count as pending junctions, we've already exhasuted the 0 side of 1s
   a = 0;
   done = 0;
   lastJunction = i;
}
   } else {                            // we are blazing new tree, take the 0
a = 0;
searchJunction = i;
done = 0;
   }
   lastJunction = i;
}
if ( a) address[ ibyte] |= ibit;
else address[ ibyte] &= ~ibit;

write_bit( a);
    }
    if ( done) searchExhausted = 1;
    for ( i = 0; i < 8; i++) newAddr[i] = address[i];
    return 1;  
}
#endif

#if ONEWIRE_CRC
// The 1-Wire CRC scheme is described in Maxim Application Note 27:
// "Understanding and Using Cyclic Redundancy Checks with Maxim iButton Products"
//

#if ONEWIRE_CRC8_TABLE
// This table comes from Dallas sample code where it is freely reusable,
// though Copyright (C) 2000 Dallas Semiconductor Corporation
static uint8_t dscrc_table[] = {
      0, 94,188,226, 97, 63,221,131,194,156,126, 32,163,253, 31, 65,
    157,195, 33,127,252,162, 64, 30, 95,  1,227,189, 62, 96,130,220,
     35,125,159,193, 66, 28,254,160,225,191, 93,  3,128,222, 60, 98,
    190,224,  2, 92,223,129, 99, 61,124, 34,192,158, 29, 67,161,255,
     70, 24,250,164, 39,121,155,197,132,218, 56,102,229,187, 89,  7,
    219,133,103, 57,186,228,  6, 88, 25, 71,165,251,120, 38,196,154,
    101, 59,217,135,  4, 90,184,230,167,249, 27, 69,198,152,122, 36,
    248,166, 68, 26,153,199, 37,123, 58,100,134,216, 91,  5,231,185,
    140,210, 48,110,237,179, 81, 15, 78, 16,242,172, 47,113,147,205,
     17, 79,173,243,112, 46,204,146,211,141,111, 49,178,236, 14, 80,
    175,241, 19, 77,206,144,114, 44,109, 51,209,143, 12, 82,176,238,
     50,108,142,208, 83, 13,239,177,240,174, 76, 18,145,207, 45,115,
    202,148,118, 40,171,245, 23, 73,  8, 86,180,234,105, 55,213,139,
     87,  9,235,181, 54,104,138,212,149,203, 41,119,244,170, 72, 22,
    233,183, 85, 11,136,214, 52,106, 43,117,151,201, 74, 20,246,168,
    116, 42,200,150, 21, 75,169,247,182,232, 10, 84,215,137,107, 53};

//
// Compute a Dallas Semiconductor 8 bit CRC. These show up in the ROM
// and the registers.  (note: this might better be done without to
// table, it would probably be smaller and certainly fast enough
// compared to all those delayMicrosecond() calls.  But I got
// confused, so I use this table from the examples.)  
//
uint8_t OneWire::crc8( uint8_t *addr, uint8_t len)
{
    uint8_t i;
    uint8_t crc = 0;
    
    for ( i = 0; i < len; i++) {
crc  = dscrc_table[ crc ^ addr[i] ];
    }
    return crc;
}
#else
//
// Compute a Dallas Semiconductor 8 bit CRC directly.
//
uint8_t OneWire::crc8( uint8_t *addr, uint8_t len)
{
    uint8_t i, j;
    uint8_t crc = 0;
    
    for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        uint8_t inbyte = addr[i];
        for (j = 0; j < 8; j++) {
            uint8_t mix = (crc ^ inbyte) & 0x01;
            crc >>= 1;
            if (mix) crc ^= 0x8C;
            inbyte >>= 1;
        }
    }
    return crc;
}
#endif

#if ONEWIRE_CRC16
static short oddparity[16] = { 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0 };

//
// Compute a Dallas Semiconductor 16 bit CRC. I have never seen one of
// these, but here it is.
//
unsigned short OneWire::crc16(unsigned short *data, unsigned short len)
{
    unsigned short i;
    unsigned short crc = 0;
    
    for ( i = 0; i < len; i++) {
unsigned short cdata = data[len];

cdata = (cdata ^ (crc & 0xff)) & 0xff;
crc >>= 8;

if (oddparity[cdata & 0xf] ^ oddparity[cdata >> 4]) crc ^= 0xc001;

cdata <<= 6;
crc ^= cdata;
cdata <<= 1;
crc ^= cdata;
    }
    return crc;
}
#endif

#endif
78  International / Français / Re: OneWire.h manquant ? on: August 08, 2011, 12:26:01 pm
Le dernier fichier je le poste en 2 fois, trop long :/


OneWire.cpp
Code:
/*
Copyright (c) 2007, Jim Studt

Updated to work with arduino-0008 and to include skip() as of
2007/07/06. --RJL20

Modified to calculate the 8-bit CRC directly, avoiding the need for
the 256-byte lookup table to be loaded in RAM.  Tested in arduino-0010
-- Tom Pollard, Jan 23, 2008

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining
a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the
"Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including
without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish,
distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to
permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to
the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be
included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND,
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND
NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE
LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION
OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION
WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Much of the code was inspired by Derek Yerger's code, though I don't
think much of that remains.  In any event that was..
    (copyleft) 2006 by Derek Yerger - Free to distribute freely.

The CRC code was excerpted and inspired by the Dallas Semiconductor
sample code bearing this copyright.
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
// Copyright (C) 2000 Dallas Semiconductor Corporation, All Rights Reserved.
//
// Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a
// copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"),
// to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation
// the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense,
// and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the
// Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
//
// The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included
// in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
//
// THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS
// OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF
// MERCHANTABILITY,  FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT.
// IN NO EVENT SHALL DALLAS SEMICONDUCTOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES
// OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE,
// ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR
// OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.
//
// Except as contained in this notice, the name of Dallas Semiconductor
// shall not be used except as stated in the Dallas Semiconductor
// Branding Policy.
//--------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/

#include "OneWire.h"

extern "C" {
#include "WConstants.h"
#include <avr/io.h>
#include "pins_arduino.h"
}


OneWire::OneWire( uint8_t pinArg)
{
    pin = pinArg;
    port = digitalPinToPort(pin);
    bitmask =  digitalPinToBitMask(pin);
    outputReg = portOutputRegister(port);
    inputReg = portInputRegister(port);
    modeReg = portModeRegister(port);
#if ONEWIRE_SEARCH
    reset_search();
#endif
}

//
// Perform the onewire reset function.  We will wait up to 250uS for
// the bus to come high, if it doesn't then it is broken or shorted
// and we return a 0;
//
// Returns 1 if a device asserted a presence pulse, 0 otherwise.
//
uint8_t OneWire::reset() {
    uint8_t r;
    uint8_t retries = 125;

    // wait until the wire is high... just in case
    pinMode(pin,INPUT);
    do {
if ( retries-- == 0) return 0;
delayMicroseconds(2);
    } while( !digitalRead( pin));
    
    digitalWrite(pin,0);   // pull low for 500uS
    pinMode(pin,OUTPUT);
    delayMicroseconds(500);
    pinMode(pin,INPUT);
    delayMicroseconds(65);
    r = !digitalRead(pin);
    delayMicroseconds(490);
    return r;
}

//
// Write a bit. Port and bit is used to cut lookup time and provide
// more certain timing.
//
void OneWire::write_bit(uint8_t v) {
    static uint8_t lowTime[] = { 55, 5 };
    static uint8_t highTime[] = { 5, 55};
    
    v = (v&1);
    *modeReg |= bitmask;  // make pin an output, do first since we
                          // expect to be at 1
    *outputReg &= ~bitmask; // zero
    delayMicroseconds(lowTime[v]);
    *outputReg |= bitmask; // one, push pin up - important for
                           // parasites, they might start in here
    delayMicroseconds(highTime[v]);
}

//
// Read a bit. Port and bit is used to cut lookup time and provide
// more certain timing.
//
uint8_t OneWire::read_bit() {
    uint8_t r;
    
    *modeReg |= bitmask;    // make pin an output, do first since we expect to be at 1
    *outputReg &= ~bitmask; // zero
    delayMicroseconds(1);
    *modeReg &= ~bitmask;     // let pin float, pull up will raise
    delayMicroseconds(5);          // A "read slot" is when 1mcs > t > 2mcs
    r = ( *inputReg & bitmask) ? 1 : 0; // check the bit
    delayMicroseconds(50);        // whole bit slot is 60-120uS, need to give some time
    
    return r;
}

//
// Write a byte. The writing code uses the active drivers to raise the
// pin high, if you need power after the write (e.g. DS18S20 in
// parasite power mode) then set 'power' to 1, otherwise the pin will
// go tri-state at the end of the write to avoid heating in a short or
// other mishap.
//
void OneWire::write(uint8_t v, uint8_t power) {
    uint8_t bitMask;
    
    for (bitMask = 0x01; bitMask; bitMask <<= 1) {
OneWire::write_bit( (bitMask & v)?1:0);
    }
    if ( !power) {
pinMode(pin,INPUT);
digitalWrite(pin,0);
    }
}

//
// Read a byte
//
uint8_t OneWire::read() {
    uint8_t bitMask;
    uint8_t r = 0;
    
    for (bitMask = 0x01; bitMask; bitMask <<= 1) {
if ( OneWire::read_bit()) r |= bitMask;
    }
    return r;
}

//
// Do a ROM select
//
void OneWire::select( uint8_t rom[8])
{
    int i;

    write(0x55,0);         // Choose ROM

    for( i = 0; i < 8; i++) write(rom[i],0);
}

//
// Do a ROM skip
//
void OneWire::skip()
{
    write(0xCC,0);         // Skip ROM
}

void OneWire::depower()
{
    pinMode(pin,INPUT);
}

#if ONEWIRE_SEARCH

79  International / Français / Re: OneWire.h manquant ? on: August 08, 2011, 12:23:53 pm

OneWire.h
Code:
#ifndef OneWire_h
#define OneWire_h

#include <inttypes.h>

// you can exclude onewire_search by defining that to 0
#ifndef ONEWIRE_SEARCH
#define ONEWIRE_SEARCH 1
#endif

// You can exclude CRC checks altogether by defining this to 0
#ifndef ONEWIRE_CRC
#define ONEWIRE_CRC 1
#endif

// Select the table-lookup method of computing the 8-bit CRC by setting this to 1
#ifndef ONEWIRE_CRC8_TABLE
#define ONEWIRE_CRC8_TABLE 0
#endif

// You can allow 16-bit CRC checks by defining this to 1
// (Note that ONEWIRE_CRC must also be 1.)
#ifndef ONEWIRE_CRC16
#define ONEWIRE_CRC16 0
#endif

class OneWire
{
  private:
#if ONEWIRE_SEARCH
    uint8_t address[8];
    char searchJunction;
    uint8_t searchExhausted;
#endif
    uint8_t pin;
    uint8_t port;
    uint8_t bitmask;
    volatile uint8_t *outputReg;
    volatile uint8_t *inputReg;
    volatile uint8_t *modeReg;

  public:
    OneWire( uint8_t pin);
    
    // Perform a 1-Wire reset cycle. Returns 1 if a device responds
    // with a presence pulse.  Returns 0 if there is no device or the
    // bus is shorted or otherwise held low for more than 250uS
    uint8_t reset();

    // Issue a 1-Wire rom select command, you do the reset first.
    void select( uint8_t rom[8]);

    // Issue a 1-Wire rom skip command, to address all on bus.
    void skip();

    // Write a byte. If 'power' is one then the wire is held high at
    // the end for parasitically powered devices. You are responsible
    // for eventually depowering it by calling depower() or doing
    // another read or write.
    void write( uint8_t v, uint8_t power = 0);

    // Read a byte.
    uint8_t read();

    // Write a bit. The bus is always left powered at the end, see
    // note in write() about that.
    void write_bit( uint8_t v);

    // Read a bit.
    uint8_t read_bit();

    // Stop forcing power onto the bus. You only need to do this if
    // you used the 'power' flag to write() or used a write_bit() call
    // and aren't about to do another read or write. You would rather
    // not leave this powered if you don't have to, just in case
    // someone shorts your bus.
    void depower();

#if ONEWIRE_SEARCH
    // Clear the search state so that if will start from the beginning again.
    void reset_search();

    // Look for the next device. Returns 1 if a new address has been
    // returned. A zero might mean that the bus is shorted, there are
    // no devices, or you have already retrieved all of them.  It
    // might be a good idea to check the CRC to make sure you didn't
    // get garbage.  The order is deterministic. You will always get
    // the same devices in the same order.
    uint8_t search(uint8_t *newAddr);
#endif

#if ONEWIRE_CRC
    // Compute a Dallas Semiconductor 8 bit CRC, these are used in the
    // ROM and scratchpad registers.
    static uint8_t crc8( uint8_t *addr, uint8_t len);

#if ONEWIRE_CRC16
    // Compute a Dallas Semiconductor 16 bit CRC. Maybe. I don't have
    // any devices that use this so this might be wrong. I just copied
    // it from their sample code.
    static unsigned short crc16(unsigned short *data, unsigned short len);
#endif
#endif
};

#endif

80  International / Français / Re: OneWire.h manquant ? on: August 08, 2011, 12:22:23 pm
Merci smiley

J'ai contacté le vendeur du capteur, et il m'a fourni le code.
Je le reposte ici pour la postérité. Si jamais quelqu'un d'autre rame un peu comme moi, google devrais l'aider a trouver ceci smiley-wink


keywords.txt
Code:
#######################################
# Syntax Coloring Map For OneWire
#######################################

#######################################
# Datatypes (KEYWORD1)
#######################################

OneWire KEYWORD1

#######################################
# Methods and Functions (KEYWORD2)
#######################################

reset KEYWORD2
write_bit KEYWORD2
read_bit KEYWORD2
write KEYWORD2
read KEYWORD2
select KEYWORD2
skip KEYWORD2
depower KEYWORD2
reset_search KEYWORD2
search KEYWORD2
crc8 KEYWORD2
crc16 KEYWORD2

#######################################
# Instances (KEYWORD2)
#######################################


#######################################
# Constants (LITERAL1)
#######################################


81  International / Français / OneWire.h manquant ? on: August 07, 2011, 01:16:28 pm
Bonjour,

histoire de découvrir l'arduino, je commence en essayant de "jouer" avec un capteur de température DS18B20, vu que ça a l'air fiable, simple a étalonner et qu'on trouve pas mal de codes qui l'utilisent.

Seulement ils semblent tous dépendants d'une librairie "OneWire.h", et mon compilateur ne la trouve pas smiley-sad il me réponds

test_sonde_temperature.cpp:38:55: error: OneWire.h: No such file or directory

ou trouver les fichiers manquants, (parce que je suppose que dans le .h y'a pas grand chose, la plus grosse partie du code doit etre dans un .c) et ou les rajouter pour que ca compile ?


Note importante : je suis sur mac. les emplacements des fichiers sont différents de sous windows.
82  International / Français / Re: Utiliser l'arduino comme interrupteur ? on: July 11, 2011, 01:25:28 pm
Normalement oui, mais ca dépends.

Pourquo tu veux pas piloter ta led avec l'arduino ?
83  International / Français / Re: Faire une raz d'un programme par une interruption on: June 29, 2011, 08:02:21 am
Il y'a aussi l'instruction break qui permet de sortir d'une boucle "infini".
quelque chose du genre :

while (1){
  while(1) {
  // faire un truc en boucle ici
  if (pin8==true) break; // Sort de la boucle
  }
// faire l'autre truc ici
} Retourne dans la première boucle.

C'est plus "propre" que d'utiliser les interruptions.
84  International / Français / Re: Petit oscillo 2 canaux on: June 20, 2011, 02:26:26 am
C'est pas un peu trop lent ce genre d'oscillo pour surveiller les sorties PMW d'un arduino justement ?
85  International / Français / Re: Quel oscilloscope ? on: June 15, 2011, 09:14:47 am
Et sinon vous pensez quoi de ce genre de matos :
http://cgi.ebay.fr/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=400084174511&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT

Un oscillo "de table" est censé offrir une meilleure précision qu'un appareil portatif ?
86  International / Français / Re: E/S TOR en I2C ? on: June 11, 2011, 12:46:58 pm
Voila, en effet ça réponds en partie a mes 2 premières questions avec un seul composant  smiley
87  International / Français / E/S TOR en I2C ? on: June 11, 2011, 08:10:24 am
Bonjour a tous,

Je débute en matiere de microcontroleurs, mais j'ai une "petite" experience en automatisme industrielle.
Seulement utiliser un automate pour les projets domotiques qui me trottent dans la tete, d'un point de vu financier c'est pas vraiment interessant.
J'ai aussi bricolé 2/3 trucs a base de PIC en utilisant SDCC, mais niveau convialité c'est franchement pas terrible.
J'ai rencontré les gens de Snootlab au THSF fin mai, et j'y ai découvert l'arduino. Ce systeme m'a l'air super, alors j'y cherche un peu mes marques par rapport a ce que je connais déja ailleurs. Du coup j'ai plein de questions.
par analogie avec le monde des automates :
- existe t'il des shields comportant des groupes de 8 ou 16 sorties Tout ou rien en i2c ?
- meme question avec les entrées.
par analogie avec les pics, peut-on écrire directement "portd=255" (ou autre) pour basculer toutes les sorties du port D d'un coup, ou bien est-on obligé des les allumer une par une avec la fonction DigitalWrite()

Voila, c'est tout pour aujourd'hui, ca va me permettre de dégrossir un peu le portage de mes projets sur pic laissés a l'abandon depuis "un certain temps".

88  International / Français / Re: Protéger port usb macbook pro ? on: June 10, 2011, 02:41:41 am
Les mac les plus récents disposent d'au moins un port USB capable de fournir plus que ce que défini par la norme.
Le premier du genre fut le macbook air car le lecteur DVD externe consomme plus de 500 mA, et Apple l'a donc doté de ports pouvant sortir plus pour que "ca marche".
Par la suite ça a été étendu aux autres modèles, pour pouvoir utiliser le superdrive dessus, puis pour permettre une recharge plus rapide des iPhones et surtout de l'iPad.

Par contre pour savoir quelle machine dispose de ports USB renforcés, ou non c'est pas simple car c'est pas forcement précisé dans le bouquin du mac en question, il faut fouiller dans le site "apple support".

Par chance, j'ai trouvé un p'tit bout d'info généraliste sur le sujet :
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4049?viewlocale=fr_FR&locale=fr_FR

Apparemment c'est pas 2A, mais "seulement" 1,1A

Après pour il faut fouiller plus (soit dans les informations système si on a le mac en question sur la main, soit sur le site d'apple si on l'a pas) si on veux savoir pour un modèle de mac en particulier. Après tout, y'a peut être des modèles a 2A.
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