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1  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: What is the best audio playback shield for 20 or 30 words? on: May 06, 2013, 01:54:24 am
Thanks for the reply. The "Shield Mp3 Player" reads audio from an SD card, as does the Wave Shield here: http://www.ladyada.net/make/waveshield/index.html

I'm still evaluating the possibilities and options...

2  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: What is the best audio playback shield for 20 or 30 words? on: April 25, 2013, 11:55:31 pm
For example has anyone ever used either of these cards:

Adafruit Wave Shield for Arduino Kit - v1.1

Seeed Music Shield V2.0

?
3  Using Arduino / Audio / What is the best audio playback shield for 20 or 30 words? on: April 25, 2013, 06:13:01 am
What is the best audio playback shield for 20 or 30 words and phrases?

Say maybe 60 seconds of audio addressable so that, for example, I can command the shield to play sample number 3.

Best makers and suppliers?

4  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Re: Capturing data from the serial monitor on: April 02, 2012, 03:01:29 am
putty.exe download: - http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/download.html -

There are other terminal programs too that can capture to file, note that terminal programs can interfere with the IDE and starting one can reset the sketch.

or one could write a script in python, or any other favorite programming language.

This is just what I wanted. Once I have loaded the sketch onto the Arduino I run putty.exe in serial mode (no flow control) and capture the output to a text file of my choice. It DOES reset the Arduino, but that is not a problem because I want to capture all output from the start of the program.

Many thanks for pointing out puTTY to me! And to the author of course.

To those who may not have used it: Note that you download the actual program, not an installation, and the first screen is the configuration screen, then it runs the terminal program.
5  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: analogRead and pinMode on: January 04, 2012, 08:57:58 am
Aha, I found this at http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/AnalogInputPins

"The analogRead command will not work correctly if a pin has been previously set to an output, so if this is the case, set it back to an input before using analogRead. Similarly if the pin has been set to HIGH as an output, the pullup resistor will be set, when switched back to an input."
"The Atmega datasheet also cautions against switching analog pins in close temporal proximity to making A/D readings (analogRead) on other analog pins. This can cause electrical noise and introduce jitter in the analog system. It may be desirable, after manipulating analog pins (in digital mode), to add a short delay before using analogRead() to read other analog pins."

So I do need to set it to input (initial guess was wrong) and my guess that I should give time for the pin to "settle down" was right.

6  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: analogRead and pinMode on: January 04, 2012, 08:50:56 am
Analog pins are input only, so there is no need, or ability, to set the mode of an analog pin. The analogRead() function knows that the analog pin is input.

Actually I've found that I do need to set the pinMode to input, else analogRead does not work.

Here is the code:

Code:
    if (eResetData == ekReset) {
        // Here you are pulling the capacitor low by making the
        // ADC a digital output temporarirly
        Serial.println  ("Reset secondary...") ;
        pinMode (ikAnalogReadPin, OUTPUT);
        digitalWrite (ikAnalogReadPin, LOW) ; 
        delay (1250) ; // wait to make sure the cap is discharged?
        pinMode (ikAnalogReadPin, INPUT); // Without this analogRead always returns 0
        analogRead (ikAnalogReadPin) ; // do a dummy read to get the pin in the right state?
    }
     

Note the penultimate statement. Without that analogRead does not work.

I'm willing to be corrected of course...
7  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: analogRead and pinMode on: January 04, 2012, 03:51:11 am
Like discharging a cap and then measure as it charges back up?

Exactly! Very perspicacious!

8  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / analogRead and pinMode on: January 02, 2012, 12:27:45 pm
pinMode is just for setting the digital input output direction, is that right?

I want to use a single pin to first output a digital zero and then do a series of analog reads. So presumably I do:

Code:
    pinMode(3, OUTPUT);     
    digitalWrite(3, LOW); 
    // other stuff
    iResult = analogRead (3) ;



9  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Re: Capturing data from the serial monitor on: January 02, 2012, 07:07:57 am
Thanks all for these suggestions, and Happy New Year!
10  Using Arduino / Interfacing w/ Software on the Computer / Capturing data from the serial monitor on: December 31, 2011, 05:48:32 am
I've searched for these subjects in the help forums but can't find a reply.

How do I capture output from the serial monitor (on the PC) into a file which I can analyse later?

I could write my own program, but that is error prone and long winded if there is an already existing solution to my problem.

TIA!

11  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Keeping and Arduino warm at -21°C - how ? on: December 12, 2011, 02:50:36 pm
I think the issue is relative humidity - at -21C you are well below the dew-point!  Condensation (or ice!?) on 250V devices is dangerous.  One solution is an hermetically sealed box with dry atmosphere, but at that temperature it might get crushed as the internal pressure falls...  Any dessicant will eventually become saturated.

Thanks all for all the advice, much to think of.

I was thinking that anyway an open-loop solution could mean overheating rather than freezing...could I be right?
12  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Keeping and Arduino warm at -21°C - how ? on: December 11, 2011, 11:15:30 am
the "wart" part of the name presumably ...

Thanks I'd never heard that term before....
13  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Keeping and Arduino warm at -21°C - how ? on: December 11, 2011, 11:11:01 am
Just build your own arduino (e.g. from a through-hole kit), and use parts with industrial or automotive temperature ratings. They're typically rated for -40C.

That is a good idea for the future, many thanks.

14  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Keeping and Arduino warm at -21°C - how ? on: December 11, 2011, 05:59:52 am
If you do end up having to go down the power resistor route, then the Arduino can be its own thermostat.

I'm a bit worried about cold restart, but you could be right.
15  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Keeping and Arduino warm at -21°C - how ? on: December 11, 2011, 05:29:44 am
With decent insulation encasing the enclosure you might well find the heat dissipated by the mains driven power supply and the arduino regulator is sufficient to keep things at a suitable operating temperature in side the enclosure.
I was thinking the same thing, but I have no idea if it will be true in practice until I do the experiment, as you suggest.

Quote
I suggest you do an experimental build using the wallwart (or whatever) and unprogrammed arduino complete with an RTD sensor leading to the outside of the freezer and see what results you get.

What is a wallwart?

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