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211  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Arduino ethernet shield w 5100 and wifi network on: October 03, 2012, 11:17:32 am
To control something as simple as Air Conditioning units you may want to use a different approach than WiFi.
Maybe X-Bee RF.
212  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Arduino WiFi Shield UDP Support on: October 02, 2012, 11:29:55 am
@mamaretti

What OSC library are you going to use, or are you going to write one yourself ?
If you intend to use ArdOSC currently no WiFi shield supports this library out-of-the-box.

ArdOSC uses some low level functions of the Ethernet library that "talk" directly to teh Wiznet W5100c chip on the Arduino Ethernet card. You'd have to rewrite that portion and adaptit to the specific hardware your WiFi shield uses.

If you are interested in an alternative solution I'll PM you so we don't hijack this thread ;-)
213  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: W5100 ethernet shield on: October 02, 2012, 11:23:01 am
Yup, that works.

Or these:

http://www.saelig.com/BRD/ETH042.htm

http://www.saelig.com/BRD/BRD032.htm
214  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Arduino ethernet shield w 5100 and wifi network on: October 02, 2012, 11:18:42 am
You could use a little WiFi router that you can cponnect directly to the Ethernet card that you already have.
Here in the US you ca get a TP-Link TL WR702n (or 702 or 3020......) viia a short Ethernet cable directly to the Ethenet card.
Then you can connect that in client (bridge) mode to the Modem-Router.

this is less expensive than buying a separate WiFi shieled and simple to set up without the need to re-write code.
215  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 30, 2012, 01:10:18 pm
The 703 and 702 use a standard USB wal wart, that accepts a standard USB cable. The output power is 5V, 1A.
That of course does not mean that this mini router is drawing one amp.

See this link http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/tp-link/tl-wr703n

Looks like, in standard mode it uses around 100mA. BTW, Dude, that information took me less than a minute to find using google here from my iPad. Information at your finger tips ;-)
216  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 29, 2012, 01:06:18 pm
I have. That is how these routers are operated in my projects.
217  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 28, 2012, 09:18:30 pm
The reason I initially suggested these routers is that the are very small. Twice the thickness of an iPhone 4 but half the footprint. Also you can supply the routers power directly from the Arduino as these routers use USB power = 5V.

Also, here in the US the 702 ( not the 703) comes with an English interface. If you buy it through eBay and someone sends it from Hongkong then obviously the chances that you may have a Chinese interface on the 702 are higher.

Routers with external antennas tend to be bigger but really any router that has a bridge- like mode would work.

218  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Soft I2C library compatability on: September 25, 2012, 05:51:11 am
Go get yourself a Digispark:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/digistump/digispark-the-tiny-arduino-enabled-usb-dev-board

http://digistump.com/#digispark

It employs a Attint85 and plugs into a USB cable.
219  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 25, 2012, 05:35:24 am
No. It is not necessary to install OpenWRT on the 703 at all. You can switch it into " bridge" mode with the installed FirmWare. TP-Link calls this " client" mode.

You don't have to set it into bridge mode, but that's the easiest way to integrate it into an existing home network. It comes configured as an AP ( access point).

What was suggested earlier is ,that you could possibly live without the Ethnet shield and connect the 703 witho a USB cable directly to the Arduino. I have not tried this but perhaps that's another route To nvestigate.

Also, these little TP- link routers have no external antenna. Their antenna is part of the PCB. I have walked across the street and can still remotely control my project with my iphone using either of these routers from any part of my house.
220  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 24, 2012, 11:38:33 am
Supplying power to the little router - and this works the same way for a TP- Link TP WR702n  or TP- Link TP WR703n. These get their power from a little USB powersupply and you can cu and connect the cord directly to the Arduino. I have both routers and this works flawless. Not sure what the power cnsumption is as my project is not pbattery powered.

Also, yes I've come across OpenWRT as well. If this is of interest, however, you cannot do that with the WR702n . It uses different (less powerful) hardwarw than the TP WR703n and does not have a USB port. The USB port on the 703 as it comes out-of-the box is meant to accept a 3G modem USB stick. With OpenWRT you can then repurpose the USB port as described above. A word of caution though. the configuration web interface on the 703 is completely in Chinese!

Then you need to consider the time it will take you to go this route. With an ethernet shield you will be up and runnig in no time. The 702 and 703 can both be configured to connect to WAP/WEP networks (I own both of them). Both offer a web interface for easy configuration.
221  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: I2C Distance on: September 23, 2012, 03:48:53 pm
Cool. Great discussion BTW. I believe that there are other projects that could benefit from your work. Thanks for posting it!
222  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 23, 2012, 03:45:13 pm
And that has to be WiFi or just wireless ?
If it can be " just" wireless then that opens up a whole lot of options that are potentially much less expensive than WiFi. Xbee rf is a lot less costly and there are a lot of projects using it successfully for such things as remote controlled " something".

Now, if you want to remote controll something wirelessly through an iPhone or iPad that will definitely make things more expensive as the wireless options a rather limited to WiFi and Bluetooth. And Bluetooth seems to only work if you jailbreak the device and run BTstack.

How about this for example:

http://www.element14.com/community/videos/1910/l/tutorial-09-for-arduino-wireless-communication
223  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 23, 2012, 01:33:10 pm
If you could provide a description what you want to achieve with your project it would be much easier to answer if the solution I suggested is " easy"
It was easy in the case of my project. I wanted to be able to remotely controll a rather sophisticated RGB Lighting System from an iPhone. There were a couple of Arduino libraries that made this easy. One of them is the DHCP/Bonjour library. In my case the router is set up in " client" mode or perhaps a better description is " bridge" mode. When it connects to my home network the DHCP client on the Arduino (well..an Teensy++ with a WIZ 812 Ethernet Module) receives an IP address from my AirPort Extreme router. Then the Bonjour service on the Arduino registers a service  (OSC through e ArdOSC librar) on the network. TouchOSC on my iPhone picks it up and I can connect very quickly to the lighting system in true ZeroConf fashion. Easy!

Your project may do something entirely different. Perhaps you can describe what you want to do.
224  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: I2C Distance on: September 23, 2012, 01:17:01 pm
I don't disagree with your assessment. Very educational!

The technical documentation I have provided links to provides very detailed instructions on how to overcome problems such as yours.

The Arduiuno drives the I2C bus with 5V. Given the resistance and capacitance of 200m of CAT5 Ethernet cable you can obviously approach the problem in different ways. Reducing the bus frequency is one, however, at a substantial loss of data rate.
If you want to maintain a higher data rate, the other approach is to drive the bus at a higher voltage, which in case of an Arduino requires additional hardware. For example a PCA9600 that is able to deal with the higher overall capacitance - as it is specifically designed to worh with twisted pair cable - and the higher line resistance by being able to operate up to 15V.

225  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Suggestion for a WiFi system on: September 23, 2012, 12:50:43 pm
If its not a mobile system, why not go with a " standard" Ethernet shield and a little WiFi pocket router like the TP- Link TP WR702n ?
Heck, even if its a mobile system this would work.
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