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1  Using Arduino / Sensors / Re: Sound sensor intensity on: May 22, 2012, 11:53:18 pm
You still seem above me on the knowledge base smiley-razz
2  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Powering light strip from arduino? on: May 21, 2012, 06:25:00 pm
Which FET should i buy, doesn't seem like anyone at the store was able to assist me... :\
3  Using Arduino / Sensors / Sound sensor intensity on: May 21, 2012, 05:43:18 pm
Hey all, i finally accomplished making an array of lights respond to low frequency sound (Bass).

My next step is to make the LEDs respond to intensity of sound (amplitude?). For example, make a VU meter light up based on the intensity of the sound.

I currently use a small electret microphone, specifically this one: http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9964

Would i be able to sense the intensity of the sound, or would i have to use something else?

Cheers,

Phil.
4  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Powering light strip from arduino? on: May 14, 2012, 09:46:11 am
From what i understand so far, you tell me to use a FET since it has a huge resistance, allowing for practically any current to go through and not damage the semiconductor?
5  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Powering light strip from arduino? on: May 14, 2012, 09:36:38 am
Any specific one?

I have never used and know basically nothing about those transistors, whats the basic difference in the field effect type? i would have to do some research while i'm at it.
6  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Powering light strip from arduino? on: May 13, 2012, 02:14:54 pm
The packaging states 12V DC and 24W, so... 2A? (ohms law).
7  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Re: Powering light strip from arduino? on: May 13, 2012, 02:06:05 pm
Thanks Mike,

I found that the strip needs 12V.

Would i use a transistor to make this work?

I have a couple 2n2222 transistors and UA741CN Op Amps, would those work?

Thanks.
8  Using Arduino / LEDs and Multiplexing / Powering light strip from arduino? on: May 13, 2012, 10:47:07 am
Hey guys,

I recently accomplished at making led lights light up to music, was proud of that smiley

I now face a problem with powering a strip of 30 LEDs, looks a bit like this: http://www.acmelite.net/images/1/p/R30X_S/led-strip-light-R30X_S-2930.jpg

From what i see on different suppliers, this strip of lights require 12V, is there any way i can provide that much voltage from arduino, or anything close to it?

Unfortunately, i have no information on my strip of lights...

Sorry, if this is a poor question, i am only a beginner.

Cheers,

Phil.
9  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Strobe light on: January 11, 2012, 01:14:57 am
Thanks for the links Magician and the help CrossRoads smiley

I will be using the 5V arduino output, so...

5 * .02 = 0.1mW *2 = 0.2mW ? (i believe i saw 1/4W &1/8W, not 1/5W lol)

Did i not account of the resistance?

Also, i noticed in some tutorials that the resistor was wired from the cathode to the ground rather than voltage to anode, is this fine? (i am assuming that the resistor is only there to protect the Arduino in this case)

Cheers!
10  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Strobe light on: January 05, 2012, 09:54:29 am
Thaanks for the replies guys! smiley

I am still a bit lost with all of this, but hope to get acquainted with all this terminology and theory.

Does this look like parallel?

http://www.filedump.net/index.php?pic=img20120105002491325774921.jpg

If so, here is the case, the first light is very bright, the rest are at the same intensity, however lower than the first one.

BTW, these lights were classified as "Very bright" and did cost more than the standard LED:

http://www.filedump.net/index.php?pic=img20120105002501325775092.jpg

Finally, for future purposes, what TYPE of transistors should i order ahead of time (which are most commonly used), so i don't have to waste free time waiting for equipment?
11  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Strobe light on: December 30, 2011, 09:58:53 am
Hi everyone!

As my title says, i am looking for guidance in making the strobe light.

I have already got the code and the circuit built using a bread board, however was having some trouble...

First off, i want to place a cluster of LEDs symmetrically in a square inside a box i built and was curious of convenient ways to connect all the LEDs?

Secondly, using the breadboard i noticed that if i add multiple LEDs in series, the more lights i add, the dimmer they get (obviously?), i am using 1 240 Ohm resistor for all LEDs (is this wrong?), also, how should i connect the LEDs to have all running at full power?

If you haven't noticed from what i am talking about, i am a newbie, so please use appropriate language with your assistance smiley

Cheers,

Phil.
12  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Sound sensor troubleshooting on: December 24, 2011, 04:25:01 pm
Would something like this work?

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/10K-OHM-Linear-Taper-Rotary-Potentiometer-10KB-B10K-Pot-/250816581962?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a65d5514a

And thanks for the great links you provided, very pleasing to read smiley
13  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Sound sensor troubleshooting on: December 24, 2011, 02:43:29 pm
Techone,

That is EXACTLY what i wanted to do smiley And you are CORRECT!

I just lack the accurate vocabulary to describe what i want in this topic smiley-razz

I placed an order on about 100 resistors yesterday, 50 @ 330 Ohms and 50 @ 270 Ohm, Any other resistors i would most likely need?

Also, which type of "controller" should i use to regulate different modes, as in the picture i showed you? I believe they are called "potentiometers"?? They have different specs, which should i look into buying?

Thanks again for the awesome help smiley
14  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Sound sensor troubleshooting on: December 24, 2011, 02:06:08 pm
Thanks for all the help fellas!!

To elaborate on my original intentions, i wanted the sound sensor to control the intensity of the light based on the frequency the sound sensor detects. Of course this complicates it as it has to be an analog control, but i would be with digital for now as it seems simpler.

Here is a picture of something i had, however broke from being cheaply built... http://www.google.ca/imgres?q=sunbeam+sound+sensor&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&rlz=1C1_____enCA463CA463&biw=1920&bih=1099&tbm=isch&tbnid=FX1AgysM3fGiAM:&imgrefurl=http://lps2u.com/newshop/products/Sunbeam-Audio-Sound-Controller.html&docid=G_djFW9YEXMHyM&imgurl=http://www.lowerpricestore.com/img/aud/sb/sc/main_640.jpg&w=640&h=480&ei=WCL2TuCFMInr0gGNuvC1Ag&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=311&vpy=307&dur=6061&hovh=194&hovw=259&tx=184&ty=119&sig=110393392758143287479&page=1&tbnh=148&tbnw=189&start=0&ndsp=56&ved=1t:429,r:10,s:0

I wanted to make something that reacts to music playing.
15  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Sound sensor troubleshooting on: December 24, 2011, 01:31:57 am
Sorry, i am a newby, the reason i set it to zero was because i did not know which value to try or what the values coming in the Signal console really meant... I was hoping someone could explain it to me.

I also ordered some resistors, so no work will be done until those arrive, but research never hurts smiley-razz

Techone, thank you for giving me a solution, however i am afraid all this information (may seem minimal to you) is far too much at my current understanding, i get the general concept though. Elaboration would be very hepful and appreciated!

Any guides on what i should work on to progress to my goal as i mentioned?

Thank you!!!

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