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1456  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Detailed How To Posts - Reading From An RC Receiver on: March 21, 2012, 10:14:39 am
Hi,
   I have finally overcome my resistance to spending money and bought a 2.4Ghz radio partly due to the results posted by Erni, partly due to a new race track opening in Dubai and finally down to getting a good price.

   I have posted an update here -

http://rcarduino.blogspot.com/2012/03/reading-from-rc-reveiver-do-you-need.html

   In the next few days I plan to post some options for interfacing with multiple inputs, in my case I need to read three channels and four RPM sensors, 7 sensors in total, the sensors update 50 times a second for the RC Channels and upto 70 Times a second for the RPM Sensors.

Duane B.

rcarduino.blogspot.com

1457  Using Arduino / Sensors / Re: IR leds and 38KHz receivers as a optoencoder or similiar on: March 16, 2012, 09:46:20 am
Hi

That's useful to know, it's handy to have the 38khz detection but the additional signal rules that most receivers come with are a real pain to live with in lots of applications, including my lap timer and the OPs traffic counter.

Thanks

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com

1458  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Servo motors for spider on: March 15, 2012, 06:17:54 am
Hi,
   Check the same page you found the price of the Hitec servo, cheap servos start at less than 10 dollars and can be found for a lot less if you are buying in bulk which I assume you will be.

   Looking at the spider, most of the servos are acting against quite a lot of leverage, you should consider this as you might need reasonable power to deal with the leverage.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1459  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Mechanical issue, mounting sprocket to stepper on: March 15, 2012, 06:15:31 am
Hi,
    Take it to a hobby shop, they have lots of pinions, RC Racers like to change their gear ratios from time to time. If none of the car sized pinions fit, heli pinions might. You should also be able to pick up a few other gears and bearings that will help you along the way.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1460  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Speed of Arduino compared to PC... on: March 15, 2012, 04:51:59 am
Hi,
   Interesting, unless my maths is wrong, taking clock speed alone, you would expect around 175 times slower. Is my maths wrong or is there a lot of floating point or multi byte maths in your algorithm ?

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1461  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Code conversion - button to radio button on: March 13, 2012, 03:04:29 pm
Hi,
   Might not be the wrong forum, just not used to seeing HTML Around here, are you using it with an Arduino ?

Duane B
1462  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Code conversion - button to radio button on: March 13, 2012, 02:57:16 pm
Hi,
   Wrong forum ?

   Here you go anyway

http://www.w3schools.com/html/html_forms.asp

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1463  Using Arduino / Audio / Re: Auduino v5 on uno only pot 4 works on: March 13, 2012, 02:00:45 pm
Hi,
   Glad to see you have come back to it, still busy myself, I have been to six, maybe seven countries since I replied. I really want to build an Auduino myself so hope this is the fix for it, if not I will have another look when I get home.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1464  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Abstract base class on: March 13, 2012, 08:01:05 am
Hi,

Unfortunately I suspect that none of this is very encouraging to the OP.

I would suggest that if the behavior and the code to implement this behavior is largely the same across devices, you can create a base class that provides a full solution for the most common device but which includes virtual functions for the behavior which is different in other devices.

If the code to implement the largely similar behavior is actually quite different between devices then you would be better creating an abstract base class rather than the suggestion above - of a base class, because the base class code would be irrelevant in many cases.

The decision is really down to the extent of the device specifics -

1) Everything about the devices is different, I just want to provide users with a class that hides this

Go with an abstract base class and create full implementations of classes for each device

2) Mostly the devices are very similar, but there are some minor differences in how they are accessed and what they return

In this case there is an opportunity to provide a base class which provides a full implementation of the most common device and derived classes which implement/hide the differences through virtual functions.

These are often qualitative decisions, If I were you I would start with a base class that implements the most common device, then try and add additional devices through derived classes, if this starts to get awkward then its telling you that you would be better of with an abstract base class and individual implementations in the derived classes.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1465  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Abstract base class on: March 13, 2012, 07:28:13 am
Hi,
   If you overload the function prototype, the assumption is that the caller knows this, what the OP is looking for is to abstract the different hardware so that the caller does not need to know these details.

OP, correct me if I am wrong and you want you callers to know that they have to pass or receive different data types for different devices ?

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1466  Using Arduino / Programming Questions / Re: Abstract base class on: March 13, 2012, 07:09:33 am
Hi,
   You can return different 'data' this way, but not different 'data types'. I assume you meant different data.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1467  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Controlling speed of motor that is being powered directly off battery on: March 13, 2012, 06:59:58 am
Hi,
   If the motor is being powered from a LIPO and is a high powered motor, it has the potential to draw 100's of amps. My RC Motors driven from 2 cell LIPOs are able to draw continuous current of over 70 Amps and start up and stall currents in the low to mid 100's.

   If the motor is drawing these levels of current a quick solution might be to drive a cheap off the shelf RC Electronic Speed Controller from the Arduino.

This project uses a 30 dollar speed controller and Arduino to control a motor thats good for 40Km/h or potentially a lot more in a car with larger tyres and higher gearing.

http://rcarduino.blogspot.com/2012/01/traction-control-part-13-we-have.html

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1468  Using Arduino / Motors, Mechanics, and Power / Re: Servo problem (it doesn't turn good) on: March 13, 2012, 03:47:51 am
Hi,
   I haven't read the servo specs, so don't know if it has a limited range. You could try using writeMicroseconds instead of write. This may give you a larger range. If you check in Servo.h you will see the min and max values allowed for writeMircoseconds, this should give you access to the full range of motion if it is not limited somehow within the servo.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
1469  Using Arduino / Sensors / Re: IR leds and 38KHz receivers as a optoencoder or similiar on: March 13, 2012, 03:45:02 am
Hi,
   This hack has just occured to me -

1) When the IR Receiver you are using detects a valid 38Khz signal, it initially changes its output to show it has a valid signal
2) Shortly afterwards it will change back because the continuous 38Khz signal is not within the signal rules (page 5 of the datasheet)
3) From this point onwards, the receiver will ignore the presence of the 38Khz signal

Now for the hack -

If someone happens to walk in front of the receiver, it breaks the continuous 38Khz signal briefly.

As soon as the person passes and the receiver picks up the 38Khz again, it assumes - 'Hey this is a good 38Khz signal' until after a short period it realizes - 'No, its not'. The good news is that during the brief 'Hey this is a good 38Khz signal' the output will change allowing you to count traffic.

Its a bit of a hack, but it is based on a valid interpretation of the datasheet.

Using this method you could use a separate 555 timer to generate the constant 38Khz signal, this would free you from running wires between the transmitter and receiver.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com



1470  Using Arduino / Sensors / Re: IR leds and 38KHz receivers as a optoencoder or similiar on: March 13, 2012, 02:46:36 am
Hi,
   The best advice at this point is to get on and do it, when you have problems come back, but try and see how far you can get first.

   The first thing you will need to do is generate the 38Khz signal, you can do this on Arduino, there are lots of code examples for using the timers to do this.

EDIT: As Chargin has mentioned already, there are some restrictions on the type of signal the IR Detector will accept. You can see these on page 5 of the datasheet you linked. I suggest that you do the maths on some of these restrictions and determine whether you think this device is suitable for your application.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
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