Show Posts
Pages: 1 [2] 3
16  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / News / Re: New book and projects kit: An Arduino Workshop on: August 15, 2010, 10:21:10 am
>>>>
Hi Smiley,

I've just been browsing the excerpts, and I *really* like how you have explained the "Genesis of Arduino".

Just a question, are all of the components included in the "projects kit" used in the projects detailed in the book?.
<<<<<

All components are used in the projects in the book.

Smiley
17  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / News / Re: New book and projects kit: An Arduino Workshop on: August 03, 2010, 04:29:12 pm
Jon,

Thanks for the nice words. I have your book and think that is excellent and I strongly recommend it for folks as a follow on to my book.

I also think that the hardware kit is a big convenience. Of course all the parts can be gotten elsewhere and possibly for less, but having it all in one place can be a real selling point. I'd imagine that your book would need a bunch of kits since it covers so much territory and a comprehensive kit would be be a bit unwieldy. Frankly though, the hardware side is a hassle that I only do to strictly to support book sales because you really have a time making the hardware pay. You might try it for a couple of the projects in your book and see if the demand is really there.

Radames,
I do get some orders from Portugal and especially Brazil, but I'm not sure how large the demand for something like this would be in Portuguese. I tend to think that folks interested in this sort of thing tend to also know English, but then the Arduino is aimed at a more of a mass audience than what I'm used to, so there might well be a demand. To me, it is telling that the design comes from Italy, but the documentation is in English.

Smiley
18  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / News / Re: New book and projects kit: An Arduino Workshop on: August 02, 2010, 10:39:20 am
214
19  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / News / Re: New book and projects kit: An Arduino Workshop on: April 02, 2010, 03:46:29 pm
Well, there is Massimo Banzi's Getting Started with Arduino which I think is a great introductory book, and Oxer and Bleming Practical Arduino that has a bunch of more advanced projects. My book kind of falls in the middle of those two, but I also provide a kit of parts to go along with the text.

Frankly, one of the reasons that hard-copy books are becoming rarer in technology is that in general all the information is available for free on the Internet. But the trick is finding things in an orderly presentation with the hardware to go along with it. That's the niche for my book.

Smiley
20  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / News / New book and projects kit: An Arduino Workshop on: April 02, 2010, 12:39:32 pm
An Arduino Workshop[/i]

Are you puzzled about the Arduino but
finding it difficult to get all the pieces in one place?




The Arduino, designed for the novice, has become so popular that there is now an embarrassment of riches when it comes to amount of information and hardware available. So much stuff is out there that some folks have trouble puzzling out what they need to just to get started.

This text, An Arduino Workshop, and the associated hardware projects kit bring all the pieces of the puzzle together in one place. The author, Joe Pardue, writes the monthly Smiley's Workshop series in Nuts&Volts magazine and is known for his breezy writing style and lucid illustrations that help folks understand complex technical topics.

With this text and parts kit you will learn to: - Blink 8 LEDs (Cylon Eyes) - Read a pushbutton and 8-bit DIP switch - Sense Voltage, Light, and Temperature - Make Music on a piezo element - Sense edges and gray levels - Optically isolate voltages - Fade LED with PWM - Control Motor Speed - And more…

Learn more at http://www.smileymicros.com

If you want to see the first three chapters, you can find them in the 'Excerpts of chapters 1, 2, and 3' hyperlink on http://www.smileymicros.com/index.php?module=pagemaster&PAGE_user_op=view_page&PAGE_id=82&MMN_position=136:136

Smiley

P.S. I understand that some folks may find this spammy, but I started a thread at: http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1269807740/11#11 to see if this was okay and didn't get an negatives.
21  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: January 19, 2011, 08:02:09 pm
This is really a C# program that generates and runs an avrdude script. Since the source code is available you could modify it to add whatever you want avrdude to do, so making it program an Arudino at the push of a button or to upload an eeprom file shouldn't for someone familiar with C.

Smiley
22  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: January 18, 2011, 11:56:16 pm
I'm not sure what you are asking. Please read the first post in this thread and you'll see that what you are trying isn't related to what this device does. If you want more detailed information please read the blog entry.
23  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: October 16, 2010, 02:20:50 pm
I'm not sure where the sample file went nor what causes it to lose the manual on the second use.

The not insync error almost certainly came because the device is set to m328p and the baudrate to 57600 so your '168 wouldn't work.

I'll check into these issues.

I did another program for more advanced users a few months back that lets the user set the device and baudrate and suchlike, and once I get a bit more feedback on this, I'll redo that program.

Smiley

24  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: October 16, 2010, 10:38:51 am
Well, you don't actually have to have them installed. All you really need is avrdude and a hex file to upload.

My assumption is that this is for use by relative novices who want to use the Arduino board with the standard Atmel tools. I felt it would be too much information to try to get them to use the application and have to hunt for the the hex file from the Arduino IDE and the avrdude loaded during the Arduino install.

Someone with the Arduino IDE already installed might want to use this if they are wanting to transition to the standard Atmel tools: AVRStudio / WinAVR / avrdude. I think the Arduino IDE is great for getting started out, but eventually you are going to run into limitations not present in the standard tools so IMHO ArdUp helps with the transition because avrdude can be a bear to use raw in the DOS window.

I'm happy to hear opposing views.

[edit]
I just looked at the code and if you already have avrdude installed you don't need to install it again so it should work with only the Arduino IDE installed if you can find you hex file to upload. That is assuming that the Arduino IDE install creates a path in the environment for avrdude. I'd have to uninstall a bunch of stuff and reinstall the Arduino IDE to find out, so if anyone tries this without installing the WinAVR toolset I'd like to hear about their results.
[/edit]

Smiley

25  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: October 15, 2010, 07:44:42 pm
Glad to hear it. And remember I would like feedback, even negative feedback can help. I find this a lot easier than raw avrdude, but I don't know how other folks will view it.

Smiley
26  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: October 14, 2010, 02:18:58 pm
I've changed the zip file to ArdUpInstall.zip that you can get from my blog link above. This uses the Windows Installer and should work.

I'd appreciate any feedback.

Smiley
27  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: October 13, 2010, 07:22:48 pm
You aren't being stupid smiley-wink. I just realized that I usually issue these things using the C# publish method so that it installs and checks to make sure you have all the supporting libraries you need (mainly .NET). I'll try to redo this tomorrow and repost the download.

Sorry for the inconvenience.
Smiley
28  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / ArdUp - An Arduino Hex File Uploader on: October 11, 2010, 10:40:44 pm
I'm not sure this is the correct forum, but here goes.

I've built a GUI on top of avrdude that eases the process of uploading hex files created in AVRStudio/WinAVR.



You can read more about this on my blog at: http://smileymicros.com/blog/?p=221 which also has a link to get ArdUp as ArdUp.zip.

I'd very much appreciate it folks who use the Arduino Duemilanove board with AVRStudio/WinAVR would try this and provide me with critiques.

Smiley


29  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Program in C?  (Without using IDE, etc) on: January 18, 2010, 07:48:22 pm
I may be observing something that isn't really a problem, but to me it seems that the key value of the Arduino is its simplicity, but that as it has grown in popularity the simplicity seems to be getting lost in all the added stuff.

I once considered converting the Butterfly to the Arduino way, then reconsidered since it seemed to dilute the value of both things.

By analogy Arduino seems like an iPhone, a marvel of user friendliness, but instead of staying simple, folks have taken off the back and now there are thousands of wires running all over the place to room full of high tech looking widgets buzzing and beeping in the background. So how is the novice going to find the original iPhone in all the clutter?

So is the original Arduino concept getting lost in all the extensions? Does this make sense and has it been discussed elsewhere in the forum?

Smiley
30  Forum 2005-2010 (read only) / Frequently-Asked Questions / Re: Program in C?  (Without using IDE, etc) on: January 16, 2010, 07:40:42 pm
I wrote several articles for Nuts&Volts about this topic, Smiley's Workshop 10, 11, 12 that can be gotten off my website www.smileymicros.com.

I kind of hesitate to recommend them though since one of the things I learned writing about this was that I found myself using the Arduino IDE exclusively for what Arduino is good at, and using AVRStudio for the things Arduino wasn't designed to do.

I've seen a lot of folks that seem to want it both ways, that is to make Arduino do everything the 'real' tools do and/or make the 'real' tools as easy to use as the Arduino. Frankly, the more I look at this concept, the less sense it makes.

Arduino is great for designers , newbies, hobbyists, etc. and even raggedy old engineers like me who just want to do a quick test of something simple. But for things it doesn't do easily, it just seems strange to try to bend it all out of shape and get folks all confused, when one could just switch over to AVRStudio/WinAVR/AVRDude.

Maybe I'm missing something.

Smiley
Pages: 1 [2] 3