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1  Community / Bar Sport / Re: MakeBlock Starter Kit (Tank) on: March 09, 2014, 09:44:00 am
Estes rocket's huh? That brings me back. So much fun! :-D

But - I have no idea why you are so angry with MakeBlock? I've spent $2500++ on their hardware since it's top-notch quality. I also purchase a lot from US stores that provide high quality like Adafruit in NYC and Sparkfun in Colorado. Quality always sells. Here's a video of what my 12 year old son built with his Tank kit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgrjOlkQctI I helped him with parts of the electronics & the remote, but the code for driving it he wrote by himself using just the standard libraries that come with Arduino.

As for programming - sure - it does of course take a little effort and it can be cumbersome at times. What I would do is to start off simple. Load the Blink sketch onto the MeDuino and verify that it works as it should. You can find the sketch under File -> Examples -> 01. Basics -> Blink. When programmed, the LED on the MeDuino board should blink once every second. Give that a shot and I'll help you out? :-)

2  Development / Other Software Development / Library conflicts on: October 29, 2013, 05:48:15 pm
Hi all,
I do a class on Arduino and micro-controllers and 3 of my 30 students got library conflicts when installing the Adafruit GFX and ST7735 libraries in Arduino 1.05. The one thing in common for these 3 students was that they all used Ubuntu and those with another OS had no issues. The conflict on Ubuntu was with the TFT library for Esplora that already has an earlier version of these files in a "utility" folder ( like here /Applications/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/libraries/TFT/utility/Adafruit_GFX.cpp on my OSX machine).

I'm not familiar with how the Arduino IDE handles class-conflicts among the two library folders (+ their subfolders) and I can't find good info on this. Does anyone have a link that can shed some light on why this failed?

J
3  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Official Arduino WiFi Shield - Issues - Improvements - Call to action on: November 02, 2012, 07:38:55 pm
For those of you having problems upgrading the shield firmware - I just did a writeup on how to do it:
http://flashgamer.com/arduino/comments/how-to-update-the-official-arduino-wifi-shield

Hope it helps!

J
4  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Updating Firmware on Arduino WiFi shield on: November 02, 2012, 07:35:46 pm
Got it cleaned up here:
http://flashgamer.com/arduino/comments/how-to-update-the-official-arduino-wifi-shield

J
5  Using Arduino / Networking, Protocols, and Devices / Re: Arduino Official Wifi shield on Arduino 328 - Multibyte write and close issues on: November 02, 2012, 02:46:02 am
@diesel look here for details on updating? http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,130124.msg980076.html#msg980076
6  Using Arduino / Installation & Troubleshooting / Re: Updating Firmware on Arduino WiFi shield on: November 01, 2012, 07:34:30 pm
Spent most of this eve at Bitraf trying to make the official Arduino Wifi Shield to behave properly. One of the Bitraf members has a cool project that involves remote control of servos. He planned to use the Wifi Shield, but it keeps loosing it's connection at random intervals - no pattern to it. I have the same shield that I want to use, so I tried to figure out how to download and install the new firmware from GitHub. I couldn't find any goo description on hwo to do it, so here's how we did it on OSX. It'll be quite similar on Windows and Linux.

1st Download the files from GitHub
Go to https://github.com/arduino/wifishield and either download the ZIP, or use GIT if you're familiar with that

Open terminal and navigate to the folder you want the repository in. Here's how I did it:
mkdir wifishield
cd wifishield/
git init
git remote add wifishield https://github.com/arduino/wifishield.git
git pull wifishield
git checkout master

The installer expects the files to be inside the Arduino-app folder. Copy wifiHD.hex, wifiHD.elf and the other files from the wifishield/firmware/binary folder into /Applications/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/hardware/arduino/firmwares/wifi-shield/ (or where you have your Arduino app).

2nd Grab the Device Firmware Updater
Next is getting the software we'll be using since AVRDUDE does not work with the 32UC3-chip in the wifi-shield. Check out this page http://arduino.cc/en/Hacking/DFUProgramming8U2 for details on installing this on your specific platform. For OSX, it should have been easy like this:

sudo port install dfu-programmer

However, instead we got this:

Error: The installed version of Xcode (2.0orlower) is too old to use on the installed OS version. Version 4.1 or later is recommended on Mac OS X 10.8.

Apparently Apple menat that minutes after releasing XCode 4.6 was a great time for maintenance. https://twitter.com/jenschr/status/264107391434502145 Yay... Some hours later the download commenced and we got it installed. Next we had to install the XCode command line tools http://guide.macports.org/chunked/installing.xcode.html#installing.xcode.lion.43 we were finally ready to go:

sudo port install dfu-programmer

3rd Set the jumper
To program the shield, you'll need to enable the J3 jumper. This isn't marked at all on the shield, but it's also the only jumper there is. (It should have been disabled by the factory.) Just place it across the two pins and you're ready to update the firmware.

4th Upload!
Note that the shield should not be connected to an Arduino. Just plug the correct USB-cable into the Wifi Shield itself without anything else.

You'll use a script from the GitHub download to do the actual uploading: https://github.com/arduino/wifishield/blob/master/firmware/scripts/ArduinoWifiShield_upgrade_mac.sh

cd /Fra PC/arduino/wifishield/firmware/scripts/ArduinoWifiShield_upgrade.sh
sudo sh ArduinoWifiShield_upgrade_mac.sh -a /Applications/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/ -f shield

5th Remove the jumper
Once the upgrade when through, remove the jumper and set it on just a single pin.


Useful links found while researching this:
http://mitchtech.net/arduino-usb-hid-keyboard/ (good info on the DFU programmer)
http://arduino.cc/en/Hacking/DFUProgramming8U2 (Official page on installing DFU for other platforms)
7  Topics / Education and Teaching / Re: Arduino Companion for iPhone and Android on: May 24, 2012, 02:04:19 am
Just to tell you all, I published an update to the app yesterday and full search is now implemented (cc @clivewright) as well as some missing entries. I've also added the new documentation for using the new Arduino Leonardo as a Keyboard or Mouse.

The Android and Playbook versions are live already, but on the iPhone it will take a couple days before version 1.1 is reviewed.

J
8  Topics / Education and Teaching / Re: Arduino Companion for iPhone and Android on: April 16, 2012, 04:58:22 am
@NI$HANT - great! then you'll get the updated version much faster than the iOs users. Android updates go live the second I push the button.

@clive yeah. that's a very good idea. I've needed it myself many times, but I'm a little unsure how to implement it. It's certainly on the top of my list.

Thanks for spreading the word about it too. The more users - the more inspiring to update it  smiley

J
9  Topics / Education and Teaching / Re: Arduino Companion for iPhone and Android on: April 15, 2012, 04:55:35 pm
Great Clive!
I'll do some updates to it this coming week. Tell me if there's something you'd like to see added.

J
10  Using Arduino / Microcontrollers / Re: bootloading the atmega328-pu on: March 26, 2012, 06:37:28 am
Thanks a lot for posting this solution! It totally saved my day! smiley

Here's a writeup on my experience bootloading this chip http://flashgamer.com/arduino/comments/using-your-arduino-as-an-isp.

J
11  Topics / Education and Teaching / Arduino Companion for iPhone and Android on: March 23, 2012, 06:26:46 pm
Hi,
Just wanted to share that some weeks ago I published a free pocket reference for mobile phones. It contains the whole basic language as well as all the libraries that comes with the Arduino software. It also contains a handy resistor-calculator. You can find more info here: http://www.flashgamer.com/apps/ The app is free and will always remain free.

I hope some of you find use for the app and that you like it!

My plan is to maybe also make a "pro" version (if I have the time for it) and that would be something like a dollar. That would contain additional content such as a hardware reference with lots of images and examples, as well as several more useful calculators. No idea when I'll get around to do this though as this is just a hobby for me.

J
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