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241  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: NEW Project on: September 05, 2013, 01:36:40 pm
You could go with stepper motors or DC motors with rotary encoders.
Depending on what route you decide to go with you'll need an adequate motor driver.

The size of the robot and what you want to achieve is something you should define so you can get more specific advice.
242  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Arduino Wireless Programming on: September 04, 2013, 11:14:02 am
Quick google search came up with this:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Wireless-upload-program-to-Arduino-without-USB-cab/
http://www.ladyada.net/make/xbee/arduino.html

But why not have all the game modes already inside the arduino and just pick the relevant one? No need to actually program it for every game.
243  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Outdoor enclosure recommendations on: September 04, 2013, 08:49:27 am
It sounds to me as the water you see condensing is not coming from outside, but is inside from the beginning. If you seal your container in a warm, relatively moist environment, when the container gets colder, relative humidity inside will rise, even though absolute amount of water remains the same. If the temperature drops enough, some water will condense.

If you think you can get a good seal, you can try purging the inside with some canned air, which is dry.
244  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Need Some Advice On Simple Robotics Project on: September 04, 2013, 12:42:17 am
I suppose this is some competition? Do the rules state that there absolutely has to be a deployable bridge, or do you just need to cross the gap and you thought the bridge would be a good idea?

If the rules allow it, it could be done without the bridge.


When the robot reaches the gap it stops, servos deploy the "training wheels", lifting entire robot. Extending arms are just over 40 cm long so they can reach over to the other side. Once over the gap, arms are raised and the robot continues normally. At least one arm would need to be powered (wheels spinning).
245  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Need some advice on a Electronic Door Lock on: September 03, 2013, 01:30:29 pm
Well, you should start simple. Go through Blink example just to get a better understanding of what is going on and the program structure, then you might consider doing the button example, to see how is that part done. I assume you will want a keypad, so look at button multiplexing. There are several significantly different ways to do it. Look around, pick the method you are most comfortable with. You'll also need a servo for your lock, so you should take a look at that as well.

When you are done with that (it could take you a few days) you might even be ready for your final project, the actual door lock.
But in general, Arduino platform is very beginner friendly and the online communities and resources are vast and full of information.
246  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Need some advice on a Electronic Door Lock on: September 03, 2013, 11:33:51 am
Any board can do what you need. It's really not much you need to be done.

Your location says you are from Brasil.
247  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: camera module HD on: September 03, 2013, 11:00:32 am
Rube Goldberguino!
248  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: camera module HD on: September 03, 2013, 10:42:57 am
Well, arduino could trigger the camera.
249  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Controlling ATX power on switch with 3.3V Arduino on: September 03, 2013, 08:42:20 am
http://pewa.panasonic.com/assets/pcsd/catalog/tx-s-catalog.pdf
It requires 16 mA at 3V.
250  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Controlling ATX power on switch with 3.3V Arduino on: September 03, 2013, 06:13:00 am
A reed relay would also work.
251  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Voltage regulator and battery pack on: September 03, 2013, 06:10:37 am
The sentence I quoted was from the first page, right side (STANDARD APPLICATION subtitle).
You can also find the information in multiple tables (characteristic is called "Dropout Voltage").

You could use a standard 3,3V regulator if that is the version you have (3,3V Pro Mini), or a low dropout regulator, something like this:
http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/78392.pdf
It has typical dropout voltage of 0,32V.
252  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Voltage regulator and battery pack on: September 03, 2013, 02:20:40 am
The datasheet says "The input voltage must remain typically 2.0 V above the output voltage even during the low point on the input ripple voltage."

Your 4 AA batteries don't supply 7V, so the voltage regulator can not function properly.
253  Using Arduino / General Electronics / Re: Controlling a solar panel via Arduino & MOSFET on digital pin on: September 02, 2013, 02:38:36 pm
What about a latching relay?
254  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Science Fair Project on: September 02, 2013, 12:44:42 am
Arduino is not good at image processing.
You'd have more chance to do it in a reasonable amount of time with a Raspberry Pi, or even a full fledged computer.
255  Using Arduino / Project Guidance / Re: Arduino as Still controller on: August 31, 2013, 01:43:12 pm
Sure you can. If all you need is one temperature sensor and one vent/motor, than any arduino will be able do that with its hands tied behind its back.
An ATtiny45 can do it too.
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