Go Down

Topic: Literal Flame Component (Read 845 times) previous topic - next topic

TheRauser

Hey everyone,

I am trying to make a thermometer (of sorts) that demonstrates the temperature as a function of the length of a flame; the hotter it is outside, the longer the flame. The problem I am facing, however, is finding a component that would let me do this. Every time I try and research a component that would make a flame, the annoying 'flame sensor' project comes up.

Tl;dr: Is there an Arduino controlled component that can create a flame (with the additional use that the flame is adjustable in length)?

cloxart

First of all you should specify how you are going to get flame:
gas? a flammable fluid with a wick?

Paul_KD7HB

Hey everyone,

I am trying to make a thermometer (of sorts) that demonstrates the temperature as a function of the length of a flame; the hotter it is outside, the longer the flame. The problem I am facing, however, is finding a component that would let me do this. Every time I try and research a component that would make a flame, the annoying 'flame sensor' project comes up.

Tl;dr: Is there an Arduino controlled component that can create a flame (with the additional use that the flame is adjustable in length)?
Where did you get this idea? Perhaps in certain cases, but not as general statement for all flames. For instance, an oxy-acetylene  torch is hotest in the blue flame near the tip of the torch and gets cooler further out in the flame. Also applies to propane and natural gas flames.

Not related to Arduino, but you can get devices that take IR images of the flame and color the image to indicate the temperature.

Perhaps you could attach an appropriate thermocouple to a ceramic rod and move it around in the flame. Use an proper amplifier and attach to an Arduino analog pin. Then, after calibrating, you can measure different portions of a flame.

Paul

Paul

GalFisk

There is no single component that creates a sustained flame. There are electric igniters that create fire and sparks for a very short interval, but that's not useful to you.

You can actually make a temperature-dependent flame without any electronics at all: attach a gas canister to a burner without any pressure regulation. The pressure of the gas will be dependent on the temperature of the canister, and the flame size will be dependent on the pressure. Draining the canister makes it cool down, but if it's large the change will be small.
Propane works down to a temperature of about -40 (F or C), butane works from just above freezing.

Alternatively, you could use a pressure regulator, but control the regulator knob with a servo. Maybe there exist gas regulators with integrated electronic control too.

If you can accept an artificial flame (not actual fire), there are other ways to do this.

cedarlakeinstruments

Pressurize a gas supply and the resulting length of flame should track the gas pressure. Use air pump and pressure sensor to control gas pressure.
Electronics and firmware/software design and assistance. No project too small

Go Up