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Author Topic: Correct Resistor Installation  (Read 845 times)
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I've looked around and google and on this forum and can't quite find the answer to my question so here goes.

I know that conventional method for installation of resistors is parallel with the board. I can see why. It makes identifying the resistor and troubleshooting problems easier.

But I need to conserve space in my design and I have seen on a few instructables people with resistor installations like the one on the right in the picture.



Is there a specific reason for this other than it saves space? I would very much like to do this. Any reason why I couldn't?
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I do it all the time, and you will see it in real products as well, though it is easier to break the lead off when they are standing up like that, so if you see them in a real product, they are often covered in "snot"
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When they are flat, they are less likely to break. I learned that the hard way when I made a glowing t-shirt and it broke in my pocket
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Awesome. Thanks for the responses!
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nr Bundaberg, Australia
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Either way is valid, on pre-SMD boards is was common to mount components vertically to save space. It also makes for a really convenient test point for a scope probe hook.

There can be strength issues as noted above but that's not normally a problem.

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I've never had problems with that way, I just pull it tight on both leads before I solder, and haven't had one break off yet
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Theoretically it aids heat dissipation too, but I think its ugly smiley-wink Also for high frequency circuitry there are many occasions where keeping the signals close to the ground plane is required to prevent parasitics, its a bit hit and miss if you stand components up like this and hope you don't get too much coupling.

Actually thinking about it its a technique to save money (circuit board number and area) rather than space, since if you lie everything down you can stack circuit boards closer together.
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Stood up they are unlikely to break off in most situations.
The taller the component is the more susceptible it is to vibrations, and its this which can tear components from the board in harsh environments.
I have designed a couple of boards where components had to be less than 12mm in height and over 5mm had to not only be glued, but laced to the board too ensure they wouldn't break free if they came clear of the board.

But for a prototype sat on your desk, or a box that doesn't move anywhere I don't know of any issues with standing them up (though I think it looks much prettier with all the resistors laid flat  smiley-razz)
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I've seen even im a module for my 93 mitsubishi they stand up resistors, usually the higher watt ones, and they sleeve the wire I guess just in case, and the larger ones they glue a little
but being the module lasted 19 years so far in a rough automotive enviroment(I don't drive slow) id say don't worry about it
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One thing I want to point out is that you have the lead bent at too sharp an angle off the top of the resistor. When doing this you want to prevent stress points. It is possible to break the lead free from the resistor if not careful. I use a fine point pair of needle nose pliers and hold the lead at the resistor, then bend the wire 180 degrees. This prevents the lead from stressing the connection when you bend it.
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I've seen even im a module for my 93 mitsubishi they stand up resistors, usually the higher watt ones, and they sleeve the wire I guess just in case, and the larger ones they glue a little
but being the module lasted 19 years so far in a rough automotive enviroment(I don't drive slow) id say don't worry about it

I bet that board is wave-soldered. That makes for a very stable connection that can withstand a fair amount of vibration.
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