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Author Topic: Where are the mounting holes?  (Read 1225 times)
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I'm getting more and more frustrated with circuit boards that have poor or no provisions for mechanically mounting them.

Some of these things (e.g. some breakout boards) would be used temporarily, on a breadboard, but many of them we want to use as part of a permanent project.  With an enclosure.  That looks decent. And won't let components short each other if someone moves it, or it falls off the table.

I just got a board that's a little over 2" x 3" that has 2 coax (SMA) connections and a power connection, and is designed for an application that implies some rough handling - and there is not one mounting hole, in spite of a large amount of unused board area.

Sparkfun seems the worst offender, but that's just because they make so many different products.

The Arduino gets a B: there are holes, but they're on a screwball non-rectangular pattern.  This bothers me much worse than the dreaded pin 7-8 gap. smiley

I know that, for smaller boards, adding holes can mean a noticeable increase in board area, which means an increased cost.  I'm willing to pay it.

-j
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Hi,

I am not sure about this as I have only just bought my first one, but I think you will find that the universal mounting hole is supplied at the end of a glue gun :-)

Duane B
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Hot glue is OK for something temporary sitting on the bench.  It is not useful for something that will be subjected to actual use for any significant time, and it is useless for anything that's going to see extended environmental conditions.

I've put stuff in rockets, high altitude balloons, multicoptors, and woodworking tools, just to name a few.  Hot glue is not how I would mount the power sensor that is going to spend the next 30 years connected to the 240V supply on my table saw, or the ham radio power management unit that will spend the next 10 years mounted in my truck.

Hot glue is decent for staking down friction fit connectors to add a bit of security.

-j
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Hi,
I have never used it, but was hoping I would be able to use it to mount a sensor on an RC car wheel hub, seems not from what your saying.

Plan B is Gorilla Glue, it's basicaly ca glue with rubber in the compound for shock resistance, its good enough to keep the tyres on my RC race car for the long term.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com
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Plan B is Gorilla Glue, it's basicaly ca glue with rubber in the compound for shock resistance, its good enough to keep the tyres on my RC race car for the long term.

Nah - Plan B is JB Weld - I've got that stuff holding on an anti-backfire valve on the exhaust manifold of the 400M block V8 in my 79 Bronco; it's lasted 8 years so far...
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Plan C: http://www.richco-inc.com/products/circuit-board-hardware.html

Scroll down about 3/4 of the way, and you'll find edge-support standoffs.

Plan D: If there are large unused areas, then you can drill a few holes.
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Plan C: http://www.richco-inc.com/products/circuit-board-hardware.html

Scroll down about 3/4 of the way, and you'll find edge-support standoffs.

Plan D: If there are large unused areas, then you can drill a few holes.

Awesome link; thanks for posting it (I've bookmarked it for the future)... smiley-grin
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I go out in the garage and make a piece on my minimill...
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I think what irritates me more than no holes, is holes in a totally useless location, for instance, open logic sniffer. Hey its great they thought enough to put mounting holes in the thing, but all two of them are on the top left an inch apart, exactly the opposite of the buttons.

so if you do mount it there when you hit a button your probably going to bend the board and splinter the first few layers of fr... brilliant

*troll face*
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<stereotype>
I believe a lot of electrical engineers are mechanically challenged and forgot their basic physics of torques or forces. I probably get tomatoes thrown in my way but that's what I see in my not-so-many years teaching them. If you bring 20 students, 10 intended for EE and 10 for ME, I can tell pretty easily maybe correct 8/10, even with them only as intended majors. Those that dress more neat, pose a little better and look with more focused eyes are mostly ME majors. Those that don't know how to stand straight or where to rest their arms or land their eye sights are probably EE majors. In their senior years, some EE major (guys, mostly guys, very few girls in either major) would grow some beard and look kind of rough (of course, long lab hours could get you that) but ME students only look more sharp on the appearance. I'm arming my tomato shield to level 9 now...
</stereotype>
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<stereotype>
I believe a lot of electrical engineers are mechanically challenged and forgot their basic physics of torques or forces. I probably get tomatoes thrown in my way but that's what I see in my not-so-many years teaching them. If you bring 20 students, 10 intended for EE and 10 for ME, I can tell pretty easily maybe correct 8/10, even with them only as intended majors. Those that dress more neat, pose a little better and look with more focused eyes are mostly ME majors. Those that don't know how to stand straight or where to rest their arms or land their eye sights are probably EE majors. In their senior years, some EE major (guys, mostly guys, very few girls in either major) would grow some beard and look kind of rough (of course, long lab hours could get you that) but ME students only look more sharp on the appearance. I'm arming my tomato shield to level 9 now...
</stereotype>

I worked for a long time in a oil refinery that used many engineers, chemical, ME, and EE mostly. By far the  best to work with were the MEs, and I was mostly involved with the electronics stuff. The MEs were just more flexible, knew they didn't know everything, would listen carefully to the 'customers' before making their decisions and recommendations. The EE were strictly from the book types that would mostly just implemented what their vendor reps and suppliers recommended and seemed to assume only they understood the problem or task to be solved. The CEs were all managers in training types as the only path to top management was to have a CE degree and from a 'name' university.

Lefty
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