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Topic: Where are the mounting holes? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

kg4wsv

I'm getting more and more frustrated with circuit boards that have poor or no provisions for mechanically mounting them.

Some of these things (e.g. some breakout boards) would be used temporarily, on a breadboard, but many of them we want to use as part of a permanent project.  With an enclosure.  That looks decent. And won't let components short each other if someone moves it, or it falls off the table.

I just got a board that's a little over 2" x 3" that has 2 coax (SMA) connections and a power connection, and is designed for an application that implies some rough handling - and there is not one mounting hole, in spite of a large amount of unused board area.

Sparkfun seems the worst offender, but that's just because they make so many different products.

The Arduino gets a B: there are holes, but they're on a screwball non-rectangular pattern.  This bothers me much worse than the dreaded pin 7-8 gap. :)

I know that, for smaller boards, adding holes can mean a noticeable increase in board area, which means an increased cost.  I'm willing to pay it.

-j

DuaneB

Hi,

I am not sure about this as I have only just bought my first one, but I think you will find that the universal mounting hole is supplied at the end of a glue gun :-)

Duane B

kg4wsv

Hot glue is OK for something temporary sitting on the bench.  It is not useful for something that will be subjected to actual use for any significant time, and it is useless for anything that's going to see extended environmental conditions.

I've put stuff in rockets, high altitude balloons, multicoptors, and woodworking tools, just to name a few.  Hot glue is not how I would mount the power sensor that is going to spend the next 30 years connected to the 240V supply on my table saw, or the ham radio power management unit that will spend the next 10 years mounted in my truck.

Hot glue is decent for staking down friction fit connectors to add a bit of security.

-j

DuaneB

Hi,
I have never used it, but was hoping I would be able to use it to mount a sensor on an RC car wheel hub, seems not from what your saying.

Plan B is Gorilla Glue, it's basicaly ca glue with rubber in the compound for shock resistance, its good enough to keep the tyres on my RC race car for the long term.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com

cr0sh


Plan B is Gorilla Glue, it's basicaly ca glue with rubber in the compound for shock resistance, its good enough to keep the tyres on my RC race car for the long term.


Nah - Plan B is JB Weld - I've got that stuff holding on an anti-backfire valve on the exhaust manifold of the 400M block V8 in my 79 Bronco; it's lasted 8 years so far...
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

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