Pages: [1]   Go Down
Author Topic: battery powering an arduino  (Read 717 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
0
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 18
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

hi

I've built a nice little project (a MIDI controller for the Behringer DEQ2496 - I'll write it up somewhere when I have time).  The project is designed to be portable.  At the moment I have the arduino in a handheld case along with a 9v PP3 battery, connected with a wire similar to http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10512

To turn the arduino off, I unplug the wire.  To turn the arduino on, I plug in the wire.  This is not ideal.

Ideally (and I know this might be a bit ambitious), I'd like to be able to have a rechargeable battery, that the project runs off when it's not plugged into the mains.  When it is plugged into the mains, I'd like it to run off the mains, and recharge the battery.  Additionally I'd like an on/off button/switch, so that I can save the battery when I'm not using it.  Finally (I said it might be a bit ambitious), I'd like a battery indicator.  I'm thinking of attaching a graphic display to the project, so if this data could possibly be sent to the arduino, I could display the battery status on the screen.


Any idea which parts of this are feasible, and which parts aren't?

What I know about batteries could be fitted onto the back of a postage stamp, so if anybody has ever come across a nice tutorial on them, I'd appreciate it. 


Thanks
Dave
Logged

Anchorage, AK
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 42
Posts: 1176
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Simple chemistries are easy... you can pretty much use a transistor switch such that when there's power via the mains input, it turns off the battery input.  Then, using a diode, you can have the mains PSU send power through the battery to charge it.  Loads of examples online, and it's pretty darn simple to set up.

Li-Ion or Li-Po are more complicated.  You can't treat them like a large capacitor -- you need a dedicated charging circuit to monitor and control both the charge and discharge cycles.  (If you want battery status, you kinda need this anyway.)  There are lots of one-chip solutions to this.  Search through this forum, and check the playground.  It's a common topic.
Logged

UK
Offline Offline
Shannon Member
****
Karma: 223
Posts: 12631
-
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

I remember that there is an Arduino that has an integrated Li-Po charger that does exactly what you're asking for. I don't remember the name, but I'm sure Google would find it for you.
Logged

I only provide help via the forum - please do not contact me for private consultancy.

0
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 8
Posts: 1411
Arduino rocks
View Profile
WWW
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
I remember that there is an Arduino that has an integrated Li-Po charger
Fio?
http://www.sparkfun.com/products/10116
Logged

0
Offline Offline
Newbie
*
Karma: 0
Posts: 18
Arduino rocks
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
Fio?

now I like that.  it's even got a xbee connector built in.  thanks very much


out of interest do you know of one that has multiple hardware serial ports?
« Last Edit: May 04, 2012, 05:05:06 am by storm » Logged

0
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 8
Posts: 1411
Arduino rocks
View Profile
WWW
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
one that has multiple hardware serial ports
That would be the Arduino Mega, with ATmega2560 (4 UARTs). ATmega644P and 1284P have 2 UARTs.
Logged

Austin, TX
Offline Offline
Faraday Member
**
Karma: 71
Posts: 6146
Baldengineer
View Profile
WWW
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
Fio?
out of interest do you know of one that has multiple hardware serial ports?
You might be interested in this description:
http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardFio

The ATmega328 chip only has 1 serial port.
Logged

Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

Pages: [1]   Go Up
Jump to: