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Topic: What was your first OS? (Read 16329 times) previous topic - next topic

cr0sh

Like  pwillard, I started out with a TRS-80 Color Computer, Extended Color BASIC (Microsoft!), 16K of RAM, and a cassette tape drive. I was 11 years old at the time, in 1984. I later moved on to a single floppy drive system, and the Color Computer 3 (with 128K, later upgraded on our kitchen table to 512K from Burke & Burke). I never got into OS-9 (my parents couldn't afford it), but I did play around with GUIs and BASIC compiling (using tools from Cer-Comp). I also played around with assembler.

While that was my first computer system, it wasn't my first "computer".

That title went to the 4 bit controllers that were inside the Big Trak (with the Transport!) and the Brain Buggy; coding was done as a series of simple LOGO-like commands entered on keyboards. I received both of these toys for xmas a few years prior to my computer (I think I was in the 2nd grade).

Somewhere along the way, I also got an Atari 2600 and a Tomy Armatron; I still have all of these items, and AFAIK, they all still work fine (though I haven't tested the Big Trak, Buggy, or Armatron - the Color Computers and Atari all work perfectly, though).

People like to talk about and think that kids that grew up with PCs and the internet are "the digital generation"; I beg to differ. People like myself and pwillard both know that -we- were among the first to grow up with real digital items all over our homes. They weren't powerful, they couldn't do as much as what came later, they weren't ubiquitous or cheap (I look at old Radio Shack catalogs I saved and boggle at what my parents spent on some of these items) - but they were more than available, and much of it was targeted toward kids.

:)

/I may be old, but I don't feel it - most days, at least...
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

Osgeld

toss up tween applesoft basic (if you want to count that) or apple dos 3.3

being born in 1979 I may not have as much retro time under my belt, but we had that darn apple II until 1994, and I still own one today
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

Imahilus

MS-Dos for me, don't recall what version or so, but it was the big floppy era at the time, the small shielded ones were a real revolution!
Ah, the release of windows 3.11 on a dozen or so floppies..
I may be young, but I grew up with computers =)
Used to mess around in basic (not very effectively, mind you) when I was..... eeehhh, don't remember  :P
As far as I know, most of my life =)

BroHogan

CPM writing in PL1 (after my Timex Sinclare)
"Data is not information, information is not knowledge, knowledge is not understanding, understanding is not wisdom."
~ Clifford Stoll

cr0sh

#19
Apr 21, 2010, 11:25 pm Last Edit: Apr 21, 2010, 11:29 pm by keeper63@cox.net Reason: 1
Quote
MS-Dos for me, don't recall what version or so, but it was the big floppy era at the time, the small shielded ones were a real revolution!


You mean 5 1/4" floppies; if you're old enough, then you might know about "flippies"...

Now the "big floppies" - those were the 8" ones; I never got to use them (but I recently acquired from Ran Talbott a couple of boxes of them - one unopened - for my "museum collection").

Does anyone here remember 3 inch microdisks (not 3.5 inch - 3.0 inch!)? They existed and were advertised in many magazines and such around 1984 or so; back when a 5 MB hard drive would set you a few thousand dollars US...

:)

[edit]And another elusive strangeness that I have never seen (but I have a controller for my Altair) - hard sectored floppies; I believe these were only available in 8" size. They had multiple index holes around the hub ring (instead of the single one you see on most floppies), where each represented the start of a sector from what I have read.[/edit]
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

pluggy

Quote
Now the "big floppies" - those were the 8" ones; I never got to use them (but I recently acquired from Ran Talbott a couple of boxes of them - one unopened - for my "museum collection").

Does anyone here remember 3 inch microdisks (not 3.5 inch - 3.0 inch!)? They existed and were advertised in many magazines and such around 1984 or so; back when a 5 MB hard drive would set you a few thousand dollars US...


I used a machine in the early 80's that used 8" floppies.   They were a dinosaur then against the nice compact 5 1/4 s.

I owned an Amstrad machine around 1985 that used 3" disks - http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?c=111 . The 3.5" didn't displace the 5 1/4 in PC land until around 1990.  I had a 286 PC that had both in, and there were briefly 2 capacities 720kb and the more familiar 1.44 Mb.  The early PC 5 1/4 were 360kb, the 'AT' type were 1.2 Mb.  Memories........
http://pluggy.is-a-geek.com/index.html

Osgeld

#21
Apr 21, 2010, 11:54 pm Last Edit: Apr 21, 2010, 11:56 pm by Osgeld Reason: 1
I had a old submini thing back when that used 8 inch floppies and reel to reel tapes

and flippies! yay flippies, I just cut notches in the last 4 DSDD 5.25 inch disks so I could use them as flippies (140k on each side yea baby)

(oh yea btw since i never really announced it here, I successfully repaired my //c over the last weekend, and thats why i need flippies)
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

pluggy

Now that you've reminded me, I saw adverts for cutter / jig arrangements to double the capacity of your 5 1/4 disks back then. I tried it with some of mine, but usually single sided ones were doubles that failed Q/C and the 'other' side was a bit flakey.  :)
http://pluggy.is-a-geek.com/index.html

cr0sh

Quote
I saw adverts for cutter / jig arrangements to double the capacity of your 5 1/4 disks


Yeah - those were popular advertisements; everyone I knew, though, just used a hole punch.

Osgeld - good to hear you got your IIc working! I have a IIgs system that worked the last time I tried it that needs some TLC; I rescued it from the trash several years ago. I want to get it working again because I found some code in an old COMPUTE! magazine that turns on the "high-res" graphics mode in AppleSoft BASIC if you have the memory for 80-column mode (I have some IIe 80-column cards, but I think the IIgs had 80-columns by default); I remember playing around with that mode in my high school programming class (took it as an elective for S&Gs, and an easy A - several times during HS) to veeeery slowly draw Mandelbrot sets (I could start it in the morning, then that afternoon when I had the class it would be done and saved the graphic on floppy; I would then pick zoom coordinates and start it again).

What I really need to get working, though, is my Altair...

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

retrolefty

Well I got one I bet few have heard of. HDOS, Heathkit OS for their Z-80 H-89 computer kit. It was built into their video display with one 5 1/4" floppy and was a lower cost version of the also avalible CP/M OS. Very early 80s. After that I switched to a Kaypro Z-80 with CP/M.

Lefty


cr0sh

Quote
HDOS, Heathkit OS for their Z-80 H-89 computer kit.


When I was a kid, I "subscribed" to the Heathkit catalog, and browsed it dreamily wishing I had the money for a Hero-1; I begged my parents for one - they told me I could have one when I graduated high school.

I am sure I ran across HDOS, but I never saw or used it, so I guess it doesn't count (I do remember reading about the H-89 in the catalog, tho).

While I graduated from high school, I never got that Hero-1; nowadays, I can't afford one unless I find someone selling one that doesn't know what its worth (that's how I found my Altair for $100.00). I did manage to recently (last year, actually) pick up a Hero Jr. from an antique/thrift store who advertised it on Craigslist; even got a few cartridges with it (didn't get the remote, though).

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

Osgeld

#26
Apr 22, 2010, 01:08 am Last Edit: Apr 22, 2010, 01:10 am by Osgeld Reason: 1
Quote
Now that you've reminded me, I saw adverts for cutter / jig arrangements to double the capacity of your 5 1/4 disks back then. I tried it with some of mine


yea, in the early days they were either really 1 sided or a dual sided that failed qc, the ones I have on the other hand ARE double sided by nature for IBM computers (pc) so they work great, you just have to notch them to write on them when you flip it over and the switch is on the wrong side


Quote
I found some code in an old COMPUTE! magazine that turns on the "high-res" graphics mode in AppleSoft BASIC if you have the memory for 80-column mode


yea anything after the //e has 80col standard, and I have tons of basic stuff, but if you want performance you need to either know apple / 6502 asm or use something like cc65 (a 6502 cross compiler)
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

cr0sh

Quote
if you want performance you need to either know apple / 6502 asm


It's been decades since I touched it, but when I was playing around with the Apple IIe in high school, our teacher gave me a task to try to figure out a way to determine if a pixel was on or off on the standard high-res screen. He had given this challenge to everyone for years, but no one had figured it out. After a week or so of work (and a lot of head scratching with the IIe manual), learning how to hand-assemble code in the monitor (typing in hex code is fun!) - I managed to create a routine that could be "POKE'd" into RAM by BASIC, and then called in the BASIC code to return a 1 or 0 for whether a pixel was on or off (on the TRS-80 Color Computer, you would just use the command "ppoint(x,y)"...).

The difficult part, from what I (barely) remember, was that the RAM for video on the Apple IIe was broken up into pages, and they were a) non-contiguous, and b) not an even multiple of bytes for a portion of the screen.

It's hard to explain - look at the manual for details if you care; lets just say the solution was very obvious or easy, but I did get it to work (for a certain level of "work" - it wasn't very optimized, from what I remember, and couldn't be used for anything like collision detection for sprites or anything like that).

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

Osgeld

#28
Apr 22, 2010, 01:33 am Last Edit: Apr 22, 2010, 01:34 am by Osgeld Reason: 1
Quote
The difficult part, from what I (barely) remember, was that the RAM for video on the Apple IIe was broken up into pages, and they were a) non-contiguous, and b) not an even multiple of bytes for a portion of the screen.


there are 2 pages for the graphics modes, and they are contiguous, just not really with each other, but its like having a buffered display, done right you can get that little crap circuit to whizz out some ok speed graphics

anywho, I am no apple programming expert anymore and all info that I have is based on skimming my old manuals once or so hehe

and back on the topic of os's my firs ms-dos machine (a turbo xt) had dos 3. something with it though by that time I never ran it cause I had MS-dos 6.22 from the shiny new 486 (yea imagine going for nearly a decade on a 512kb 30mb disk space apple //e to a cd-rom + soundcard + svga 8MB 486dx2/66 overnight, I about shi+ on myself, as the best pc my buddies had was a 486sx/25 with the usual pair of floppies)
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

spookybonus

the first computer i owned ran win95, i used win 3.1 in school and in elementary school they had apple IIe's that i played oregon trail on.

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