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Topic: Where to start and where to go from there? (Read 9 times) previous topic - next topic

Peter9DO

Thank you for the reply! I have found myself getting very comfortable with the Arduino in the past few weeks. I have neglected the grass and the beautiful weather to sit in my office hunched over my work bench with parts around me!

Now, when you stated that you normally take a skeleton of a sketch and work it around what you're doing, that basicly what I did however, I felt like I was cheating or stealing. But as I make my project more advanced and it evolves into what I thought up, these sketch skeletons have merged into something very unique. At the time that I posted this, I really just didn't have much direction and I was hoping this thread would stay alive to help the people like me who are asking the same question. You have to stop doing the "safe" projects in the book and think up something that you can use, from stuff around your house. Maybe something else that you have a passion in. Once you have an idea as to what you want to make. Everything really comes natural from there. I have been stuck and I asked in the fourm, I have asked questions just to get ideas. For the most part every person on this fourm is willing to help (except for the few that just make you want to feel like your an idiot for not knowing something), but if you don't give up and understand that these are "projects" that will not come together overnight but will take weeks, months maybe years to complete. Just being acceptable to the learning experence is all you have to do to really fall in love with the Arduino. You really have no limits so run with it! Again, thank you for all the posts, I think this would be a great post to read to anyone that is starting out, and have tryed to go by the book.... Ditch the book, and get your hands dirty!
What if Burt Reynolds, really changed his name to Turd Ferguson?

focalist

That is actually one of Arduino's biggest strengths, also.. the fact that Arduino isn't what a lot of these sites are, what I call "Nerd Barbecues".  All you find at a Nerd Barbecue are Weenies and Flamers.

It just simply doesn't play here.  First, it gets really clear who the real engineers and the helpful folks are, and who is just trying to troll.. and trolls just don't get fed.  I find the lack of trolls here amazing, the general "feel" of the forums is one of positive collaboration in most cases, and not "I know more than you".  I think it's really a function of the population here, it's not a bunch of twelve year olds (or adults acting like twelve year olds) bickering over who has the biggest nerd badge...
When the testing is complete there will be... cake.

Peter9DO

What if Burt Reynolds, really changed his name to Turd Ferguson?

focalist

#13
Jun 16, 2012, 12:10 am Last Edit: Jun 16, 2012, 12:16 am by focalist Reason: 1
Quote
Now, when you stated that you normally take a skeleton of a sketch and work it around what you're doing, that basicly what I did however, I felt like I was cheating or stealing.


Don't!  Those are there specifically for this purpose... in my opinion, there should be more of them!  In programming parlance, these are called Skeletons or Stubs.  Basic framework for a working but simple implementation of a particular function.  From there, you customize and expand upon it.  Just be sure to use "Save As....", and if you feel strongly, virtually every example and stub has comments indicating who the author was- just leave those comments in, and add a comment referencing that you built off their work.  Fact is, 99.999% of things published here have been done before, and better, by a professional at some point.  There are some exceptions of course, but more often than not, Arduino projects really do revolve around a fairly tight set of ideas-- sense/react, motor control, blinking lights.  I'd say those three cover 80% of Arduino projects.

The point of Open Source is that hopefully you don't have to re-invent the wheel a hundred times, you can instead select from a bunch of wheels folks have made.  When you are done with your project, it too becomes a wheel if you publish it (which you should).  Someone else may have a need for what you did.. not exact replica, but close... they may then add their own whatever to it, and so on and so forth.

Even if you DO reinvent the wheel (I have, in an easy to carry triangular shape) your particular approach is likely to be unique.. and at a minimum, you learn something while having fun.  Can't beat that with a stick!

When the testing is complete there will be... cake.

Peter9DO

I took the more basic things like the servo and IR library and that's about it to be honest with you, I had to look at a couple of different sketches becuase I did everything in steps like I started with the servo on sweep then I added a push button along with edits to the servo's range of motion. Then I removed the button and put an IR on it, followed by a series of relays, Then I had to assign the remote signals to a single function, along with adding some extras to the project.

Now my problem about sharing what I have made is that it's not the safest thing and has to do with a firarm and I don't want that to be in the hands of the wrong people because I have morals. But on the other hand I can hardley contain my excitment about how cool this project is and I want to share it and show it off. But, I really don't thing it would be a good idea to share this.

See, I'm an amputee and it's hard for me to shoot some of my guns so I made this to help me get some use out of my toys that I can't part with. You know it's like you said. I'm not reinventing the wheel, I'm just putting my own spin on it. I know there are similar items out there but to be able to build it, the way I want it, is what makes the difference. On top of it, I'm combining two of my favorite hobbies and making something that will go along with my "never let anything hold you back" attitude in regards to my disability. I don't like that word "disability", by calling yourself disabled, it's close to saying "I give up". Where there is a will there is a way and at any point I come across something that posses a challange, I go for it, and will not stop until I bring home the W!

Anyways, once I'm done with this project, I'm looking forward to my next big idea. At least I have a little background into the software, hell I have even learned some hardware tricks as well in this process. None the less, this fourm is awesome and there are a lot of good people on here and there is a big community type feel to it. Again, thank you for the replies on this fourm! Just out of curriosity what kind of projects have you done using the Arduino?
What if Burt Reynolds, really changed his name to Turd Ferguson?

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