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Author Topic: Ubuntu Repository Not Up To Date With IDE 1.0.1  (Read 2574 times)
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I am new to the forums, but I just reinstalled XUbuntu on my laptop and I noticed that the Ubuntu repository doesn't have the new IDE on it yet.

Will this be updated soon? For now, I'm just using the downloaded-and-extracted version, but I still think it's a good idea to keep everything on the same version.


Thanks.
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That's in the hands of Canonical/Ubuntu community rather than the Arduino community.  Its not too difficult to install the newest version on the Arduino website.  The last time I checked, 10.04 was still installing 0018 from the repository.....
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Well, I just installed Ubuntu (actually, Xubuntu) 12.04 LTS, and the repository had Arduino IDE 1.0.

What is the process for Canonical to update that? Do they have to be notified and review it or something?
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The main Ubuntu repository will probably never be updated to the latest release.  Once a package version is released in the main repo, it stays the same version for compatibility with other modules/libraries (there are a few exceptions to this).

You need to look for an Arduino PPA repository.  PPA repos are non-supported, self-contained repos that can contain more up-to-date software.  (Unfortunately, I could not find one).

The Arduino project should really consider creating an official Arduino APT/PPA (for Debian,Ubuntu variants) and Yum (RedHat,CentOS variants) repositories.  It could even support multiple Arduino versions simultaneously without automatically updating to the latest release.
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When I've got some time I'll do a tutorial on how I achieved this :



Its roughly based on my earlier one linked from the playground :  http://www.pluggy.me.uk/arduino-ubuntu/

The 0018 won't work on my present boards with Uno bootloaders since it doesn't understand Unos smiley-wink

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I just went to the the Arduino main page, Download Arduino Software and choose Linux 32 bit.
It downloaded to Download folder in Home. Then, did Extract here. Now saw 6 folders and
2 files. Now make a folder called Arduino 1.0.1. Copy everything from Download to Arduino 1.0.1 folder. The file arduino launches the IDE. Double click and choose Run. The IDE opens. Now make arduino executable and then make desktop launcher for the new Arduino IDE.

If you still have the older IDE, remove it first. sudo apt-get remove arduino. Then do a purge.
sudo apt-get purge arduino. Answer y for yes. The older IDE is gone.
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I just went to the the Arduino main page, Download Arduino Software and choose Linux 32 bit.
It downloaded to Download folder in Home. Then, did Extract here. Now saw 6 folders and
2 files. Now make a folder called Arduino 1.0.1. Copy everything from Download to Arduino 1.0.1 folder. The file arduino launches the IDE. Double click and choose Run. The IDE opens. Now make arduino executable and then make desktop launcher for the new Arduino IDE.

If you still have the older IDE, remove it first. sudo apt-get remove arduino. Then do a purge.
sudo apt-get purge arduino. Answer y for yes. The older IDE is gone.

I've done all of this. Setting up the IDE isn't really the problem, I just think that the repository should reflect the newest IDE, especially for beginners to either Arduino or Linux.
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I just went to the the Arduino main page, Download Arduino Software and choose Linux 32 bit.
It downloaded to Download folder in Home. Then, did Extract here. Now saw 6 folders and
2 files. Now make a folder called Arduino 1.0.1. Copy everything from Download to Arduino 1.0.1 folder. The file arduino launches the IDE. Double click and choose Run. The IDE opens. Now make arduino executable and then make desktop launcher for the new Arduino IDE.

If you still have the older IDE, remove it first. sudo apt-get remove arduino. Then do a purge.
sudo apt-get purge arduino. Answer y for yes. The older IDE is gone.

I've done all of this. Setting up the IDE isn't really the problem, I just think that the repository should reflect the newest IDE, especially for beginners to either Arduino or Linux.

Repository maintainers rarely track the latest for obvious reasons. At any rate, what Ubuntu or Debian does with Arduino is really out of the hands of the Arduino folks.
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I yield() for co-routines.

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Repository maintainers rarely track the latest for obvious reasons. At any rate, what Ubuntu or Debian does with Arduino is really out of the hands of the Arduino folks.

Why wouldn't maintainers track updates?
And okay, I didn't know so I thought I'd check.

Thanks.
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On Ubuntu 12.04, my user was not allowed to open serial ports.

I had to:
- add myself to the dialout group:
$ sudo adduser myuser dialout
- logout and login to take the new group

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On Ubuntu 12.04, my user was not allowed to open serial ports.

I had to:
- add myself to the dialout group:
$ sudo adduser myuser dialout
- logout and login to take the new group



Read the man page on udev and udevd. You can add custom instructions to this daemon to make this work out of the box.
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Repository maintainers rarely track the latest for obvious reasons. At any rate, what Ubuntu or Debian does with Arduino is really out of the hands of the Arduino folks.

Why wouldn't maintainers track updates?
And okay, I didn't know so I thought I'd check.

The intent of most distros is to provide a consistent experience for their users. Negotiating various dependencies and introducing potential instability (not just for the Arduino app, either) is not something most distros want to do.

If you want to track latest and greatest, install it yourself. This is the Way of Linux these days.
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Read the man page on udev and udevd. You can add custom instructions to this daemon to make this work out of the box.

This my previous message as help and bugreport.

I just write the previous message with a simple solution for people that will be in trouble. The IDE does not report any error for being denied access to /dev/ttyACM0; and I did not found any instruction to resolv this problem on the arduino website.
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Read the man page on udev and udevd. You can add custom instructions to this daemon to make this work out of the box.

This my previous message as help and bugreport.

I just write the previous message with a simple solution for people that will be in trouble. The IDE does not report any error for being denied access to /dev/ttyACM0; and I did not found any instruction to resolv this problem on the arduino website.

I not saying what you did is wrong; I'm saying there is a recommended solution in modern Linux.

By using udev you can put in rules for any device id you ever use. And note that /dev/ttyACM0 doesn't actually appear on my Debian based box. With udev it sets the mode, the ownership and gives it an easy to remember softlink.

Also, this is not strictly a problem with Arduino. It is a problem for anyone needing to use any bus-based PTTY. So this is why the answer is found in these forums. I'm pretty sure if you looked at the full error message (see preferences) from avrdude in Arduino, and search on that error message here, you'll see lots of refs to udev, and how to configure it.
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I yield() for co-routines.

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