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Topic: The inexpensiveness of foreign component dealers relative to US dealers. (Read 3519 times) previous topic - next topic

marco_c

I'll provide a slightly different perspective.

As a hobbyist I do not build stuff for production, and most of my projects are 'for interest' and learning, so I want the bits I need to be as inexpensive as possible. As an example, I can buy LEDs for $0.60 each from a supplier in Australia (where I live), pay $15 for delivery (fixed fee, so you want to wait until you have a big order) and get them the next day OR pay $0.02 each from a supplier in Thailand and $2.50 for delivery and wait a week.Resistors at $1.60 for 8 (locally) or $0.01 each from Thailand. The same logic applies to the sort of ICs that I would use (nothing specialised).

What additional value do I get by paying (high) local prices? It is really a no brainer for me and many like me.
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Docedison

Exactly... business without the 'protectionism' that my county is guilty of as well... Buy American... For Expensive Cheap Crap... The Same M/M jumper kits I buy on Ebay for $1.50 cost $3.95 - $4.95  and more dollars on Amazon... Yeah, Right, it's the SAME Stuff, just paying someones BMW payment... and I don't even get to drive it... Even once in a while... I'll spend my dollars where they go farthest, Thank You...

IMO.

Doc
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

war_spigot

Although Radio Shack does spend some money on distributing parts to their stores(and probably not in large quantities), this and this are way overpriced.

terryking228

Quote
Radio Shack does spend some money on distributing parts to their stores


Sigh... those prices ARE ridiculous!  Someone there has some spreadsheet that tells them what the markup must be and what's the risk of getting stuck with inventory...

That said, Radio Shack for the first time in years has added something like Arduino to their stores..  When I'm back in the USA I will buy some stuff from them, both for "Buy Local" and nostalgia for the first store in New Haven in 1957, before Tandy Leather Company bought them. Anyone else remember a table with tanned hides on it in a Radio Shack??  That's after the era when Doc and I remember Cortland Street, Vesey Street and Fulton Street in New York and the piles of WWII surplus radios.   Guess where those streets ended up?  UNDER the brand new World Trade Center. And we know where that ended up. 

Constant Change is Here To Stay...
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db2db


A Max7219 I got from China, and another one bought from Maxim directly have very different printing on them.
That may be a clue.

MichaelMeissner


Sigh... those prices ARE ridiculous!  Someone there has some spreadsheet that tells them what the markup must be and what's the risk of getting stuck with inventory...


Yes, agreed.  That being said, they are convenient, if I need a LED or switch, etc. immediately since there is one near my work that is open late that I can stop in on the way home.


That said, Radio Shack for the first time in years has added something like Arduino to their stores..  When I'm back in the USA I will buy some stuff from them, both for "Buy Local" and nostalgia for the first store in New Haven in 1957, before Tandy Leather Company bought them. Anyone else remember a table with tanned hides on it in a Radio Shack??  That's after the era when Doc and I remember Cortland Street, Vesey Street and Fulton Street in New York and the piles of WWII surplus radios.   Guess where those streets ended up?  UNDER the brand new World Trade Center. And we know where that ended up. 

Constant Change is Here To Stay...

Yep, I never understood the synergy between the leather and the electronics side of the business.  That being said, a few weeks, I did buy some leather from Tandy, and at least browsed for electronic parts at the Shack.  I've gotten in something called steampunk (a mixture of old looks, and new technology), and I was thinking about the next mods to my steampunk camera to have a leather covering, and to use the Arduino as part of the shutter release.  As of now, neither is in the current camera, but I imagine someday they will be.

Thinking of Radio Shack, it caused me to remember that they used to sell the TRS-80.  I never owned one, but I just used google to look up the specs, and my R3 Uno has more memory and a faster clock speed than the original TRS-80.

db2db


One other thing to remember is that if you are making prototypes of a design you might eventually make more of, you should select components that have a reliable supply chain.

If you use for example a 7 segment display that was cheap from an Asian store, plan on redoing your design when you have to switch to a display that is always stocked by Digikey, Mouser etc.




MichaelMeissner



One other thing to remember is that if you are making prototypes of a design you might eventually make more of, you should select components that have a reliable supply chain.

If you use for example a 7 segment display that was cheap from an Asian store, plan on redoing your design when you have to switch to a display that is always stocked by Digikey, Mouser etc.


Yep, I've been waiting for an Arduino device that was a kickstarter project (triggertrap), and it is nearly a year from the time I paid for the early device, and in theory, they will be shipping shortly.  Originally, they were hoping for the end of 2011, but have had many different setbacks.  One of their problems in fact was the 16x2 display that they picked up in England when doing the prototypes was no longer available when they went to China to get the units manufactured, and the newer units had somewhat different specs, particularly with power consumption, which they were trying to optimize for.

Docedison

Maxim originally used a printing method that used an ink... up until the early 2000's then they switched to a laser etching method of marking chips. Much the same as everyone else did about that time. So it is very likely that the parts difference you are noticing is just the age of the part. That part to the best of my limited knowledge was never second sourced and it's brother the '7221 is also unique. This makes the likelihood of a counterfeit part most unlikely... If it indeed does work, The chips are batch rested before packaging so the only possibility is someone getting a batch of chips that didn't meet spec and then packaging those chips as New Product. The packaging process is difficult enough that it is most unusual to be able to find a fab house that would take on the task.... NO Money in it really unless one went really large scale... and where are the supplies and where is the profit for an endeavor that limited?. No the fact is that counterfeit chips are usually second sourced items that don't meet original specifications. or commercial parts re-branded to appear as better quality than they really are. This includes speed, operating temp and device tolerance. Like turning a VW into a BMW by changing the logo... Possible but easily discovered by inspection or in the case of components by test just as the counterfeits are discovered now. At least this is my experience and Opinion...

Doc
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

James C4S

Radioshack isn't in the business of selling components.  Stop comparing prices at the retail store which sells cell phone contracts to a guy in China with an eBay account.

This is analogous to paying $1.25 for a can of Coca-Cola at the gas station, but less than $0.50 in a case at the grocery store.

Same product sold through a different channel and, in some cases, a different type of customer.
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

doughboy

I highly doubt tayda sells fake or defective parts.

from reading this thread, its amazing to read the reasons people come up with to justify the exorbitantly higher price they pay for the same parts. These people are a salesman's dream come true.  As for higher prices from U.S. sellers, I can see how a store with an actual store front has higher overhead, etc. needs a higher markup in order to make a profit, (and I don't mind buying from them from time to time) but for someone operating an online business out of a new york apt? well maybe the rent there is high...

JoeN



A Max7219 I got from China, and another one bought from Maxim directly have very different printing on them.
That may be a clue.


Thanks.  Did they work correctly?
I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

db2db




A Max7219 I got from China, and another one bought from Maxim directly have very different printing on them.
That may be a clue.


Thanks.  Did they work correctly?


Yes, they both seem to work perfectly.

floresta

Quote
... and I remember Courtland Street in New York ...

No you don't.  You remember Cortlandt Street.

Don

focalist

The Trash80.  I do miss them.  I saw a CoCo the other day.

After the PDP died, our "computer science" department became one, then three, then eight Model I and III's, and the awesome IV.  The "network" consisting of wedge boxes with rotary switches.....lol....  Okay, come on.. Who didn't have to cassette load a Tandy once or a thousand times?  Who didn't play music and sound on the cassette tape control relay using BASIC and a bit of inline assembler from "Compute!"

Like I said, I bottom feed on ebay, often times I am the first buyer from a vendor, many times they are dumping low priced stuff in volume to build positive feedback ratings.  In over a hundred such transactions, I have had only had trouble with purchases from two vendors.  US vendors, sadly....

Total flashback there.  Grew up in a tiny town of 1,500 in the "Northwoods" in Wisconsin... The nearest parts store for a nerdy kid was a significant drive, and it was Radio Shack.  However, my grandma lived next to the town's TV repairman, a great old guy named Edmund.  He would give me components, show me stuff he was doing and tinkering with (he was a HAM), lanky old guy and a shop full of the coolest collection of busted crap EVER.  If there is a Nerd Norman Rockwell, it's me stopping at Edmunds after school, after I grabbed a glass bottle of Pepsi from my grandma's fridge.  Me plopping down on the stool next to his at his bench, and him hunched over, the place reeking of solder and bakelite, showing off his freshly finished homebrew RF amp.  Great image.

Anyway, I would order "rejects" of a follow-me type game called Einstein from a company called Poly Paks.. They sold bulk lots of components and weird things.  I would buy a ten pack of the games, sit down, and from ten build seven that worked.  Mostly soldering a battery wire.  I paid two bucks each in the pack, and sold the working ones to friends for ten bucks.  I then would buy one of Poly Paks famous Paks.  Components, by weight.  five pounds of cut lead resistors, mixed value.  Small signal transistors.  all kinds of stuff cheap.   It was all just surplus on a job run.  all good, just surplus.  

This was maybe '76-'83 maybe?
When the testing is complete there will be... cake.

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