Go Down

Topic: Would a 3v Negative Voltage Spike Damage the A/D converter? (Read 859 times) previous topic - next topic

jaydie

I'll be using one of the analog in to monitor a signal. I'll be capturing positive voltage spike (5us spike) around 3v but the I notice that there are also negative spikes (-3v). Would the negative spikes damage the A/D?

I have try to use a diode but the signal is too weak that even the positive spike can't pass through. It may also that the diode I have is not fast enough to respond to a 5 us signal. I'm planning to just directly connect it to the analog input I just want to make sure that it won't damage the A/D.

Thanks

Magician

Usually it's a current, or power ( I x V ) what create a destruction in silicon, so simply put a  limiting current  resistor.
Data sheets says 1 ma,  IIRC. So 10k resistor should keep inputs safe up to 10 V, both polarity.
Arduino ADC is too slow to capture 5 usec pulse, one readings take 110 usec.   What is the origin of the pulse?

Krodal

#2
Jun 12, 2012, 06:24 pm Last Edit: Jun 12, 2012, 06:55 pm by Krodal Reason: 1
It might damage the input.

You can use a resistor of 1k to 10k in series with the input.
That will almost not reduce the maximum input frequency, due to the high impedance of the input.

If you use a diode, use a schottky diode. Most of them can handle high frequencies with ease.


What is the minimum pulse length for an interrupt ? I think it is about 100ns, but I can't read it in the datasheet.

MarkT


I'll be using one of the analog in to monitor a signal. I'll be capturing positive voltage spike (5us spike) around 3v but the I notice that there are also negative spikes (-3v). Would the negative spikes damage the A/D?

Probably destroy the input protection circuits for that pin or the whole chip (via SCR latchup).  You defintely should never do this.
Quote


I have try to use a diode but the signal is too weak that even the positive spike can't pass through. It may also that the diode I have is not fast enough to respond to a 5 us signal. I'm planning to just directly connect it to the analog input I just want to make sure that it won't damage the A/D.

Thanks


Then you've put the diode in the wrong place.  anode to ground, cathode to the analog input pin.  Add a resistor (1k will do) between the source and the analog input.  The diode is reversed biased for positive signals and will not affect them at all.

Since the spike is so short you should be thinking of using the on-chip comparator circuit, not the ADC (conversion time 110us as has been mentioned).
[ I won't respond to messages, use the forum please ]

Go Up