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Author Topic: What do you use to strengten groups of components?  (Read 1211 times)
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Say I have a few resistors soldered together with a few wire leads, on it's own it's not that strong as it's only the solder holding it together.  I could maybe use hot glue to just cover the entire thing, but even then it may not be enough and will require lot of glue to be effective.

For bigger things like entire circuits I know you can use a breadboard, but I'm talking about stuff like voltage dividers that a breadboard would be overkill for.

In fact what do you guys use to hold circuit boards and protect them?  I have a bunch of HDD tray inserts from my servers but wondering what else people use.  Cardboard boxes, small tupperware containers?

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if you twist leads together and apply molten solder I assure its going to be stronger than some crappy hot glue, probably requiring a couple pairs of hefty pliers and lots of elbow grease to even pull apart, then the component itself is more likely to fail than the joint.

if you just want to keep something from bouncing around in a environment that should not have some ghetto solution applied to it in the first place, then hot glue it.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2012, 02:18:59 am by Osgeld » Logged


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Buy more little breadboards or use stripboard and solder to that.  Floating components soldered together is too much of a bodge.
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Make a mechanical joint before you solder it. Bend the end of the wire into a small hook. Loop two of these hooks together and squeeze the two together. Then apply the solder.
However mounting components in mid air is not a good idea.
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Make a mechanical joint before you solder it. Bend the end of the wire into a small hook. Loop two of these hooks together and squeeze the two together. Then apply the solder.
However mounting components in mid air is not a good idea.

^ Strongly agree. This is what I do if, for example, I want an LED or something wired off-PCB, with inline resistor. I also like to heatshrink over the joint as well. I also sometimes do this with voltage regulators or similar-packaged components that are a struggle to fit in an enclosure (because of the tab height) and I'm too tight to buy another box smiley-razz I make off a nice long tinned end on the wire, spiral it around the Vreg's leg, solder and heatshrink. Hasn't let me down yet.
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Well.... You get what you pay for, If it's (the project) a throw away thing... whatever. If you are building something you 'might' seriously use then build it seriously.
Kludge construction is just that and no more. Would you be proud to put your name on it?
I guess it's about what you think of your Name as that will direct how you approach and solve a given situation. Personally if it is worth spending time doing something is it worth doing right or you will do it over till it is right. Every action has consequences.

Doc
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If your worried about it being too flexible then tie the resistors as close to the bodys as possible then solder, leaving only the othe leads sticking out, this way there's no excess leads to give and move
but I agree, if its soldered and twisted your snapping the lead before the connection before it comes apart
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My typical practice is to build test circuits with breadboards or wire with alligator clips on the ends.  From that it get transferred to strip board for one offs or custom PCBs from one of the on line places for production runs.  I find that the more projects I build the better off I am getting proper tooling.  Crimp tools, better solder station, punch-down IDC tooling and ends.

In the past I have also used nails pounded into wood as the basis for a circuit.  You can't reliably solder to nails but you can wrap your component ends around them and solder the leads to each other and just use the nails as support.
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For small circuits you can use cute little 1" by 1" protoboards:

http://www.sparkfun.com/products/8808
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In the past I have also used nails pounded into wood as the basis for a circuit.  You can't reliably solder to nails but you can wrap your component ends around them and solder the leads to each other and just use the nails as support.

And then you stick the nail on the other end into a lemon for power, right?  smiley-cool
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well ... I have done it a time or two making old timey looking circuits, if its not too sensitive, and your using copper nails, a good old 150 + watt soldering gun will do it  smiley-evil

course some of these irons we have available today would probably do it as well (thinking about the pencil grip pace we have at work ... tiny little thing, 100 watts, works great on lead free ground planes ...)
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In the past I have also used nails pounded into wood as the basis for a circuit.  You can't reliably solder to nails but you can wrap your component ends around them and solder the leads to each other and just use the nails as support.

And then you stick the nail on the other end into a lemon for power, right?  smiley-cool

I never tried the lemon thing.  I do have a calculator that runs on water, came with my Hako solder station.
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Hmmm lemoduino...
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Hmmm lemoduino...

Part of the Citroduino family
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Hmmm lemoduino...

Part of the Citroduino family
Can I use a pickle as a voltage divider and run the project from AC mains?  Would that make it a picduino?  (Hmm, something very wrong with that name)
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