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Topic: Guidance on first project, parts needed. (Read 641 times) previous topic - next topic

fantome2024

Hello I'm starting on my first Arduino project and was needing a little community guidance.  I want to make a board that has a sound activated servo. Also with that server I would like to be able to switch it to manual mode and use a button to start and stop the servo.

Any help with the parts needed and guidance on the programming would be helpful. :)

pylon

Define "sound activated"! What kind of sound? Should it activate as soon as some level of loudness is reached? Does it have to be a special frequency that activates?

What's the servo supposed to do? How much torque does it need to have?

In any case, I'd suggest to break the project into pieces. Start with the manual control of the servo. When that works you can start to think about how to activate with your "sound".

xolroc

You'll want an electret mike to get the sound input.
You'll need to amplify the output of that electret, which would require at the very least a transistor (I'd recommend a 2N4401, very reliable) but preferably an op amp, such as the LM386.
You'll need a servo, of course, and the requisite circuitry to drive a servo (connecting it straight to the arduino is a good way to get a fried arduino).  I recommend the adafruit motor shield; it has all the drivers on it to safely use servos, steppers and standard DC motors with an arduino: http://www.adafruit.com/products/81
Then of course you'll need a button--a cheap momentary SPST will work.
And of course you'll need all the passive components needed to make all this work, like biasing resistors for your transistor or op amp, capacitors for power stability and smaller capacitors for your amplifier, a pullup resistor for your button, etc.

fantome2024


You'll want an electret mike to get the sound input.
You'll need to amplify the output of that electret, which would require at the very least a transistor (I'd recommend a 2N4401, very reliable) but preferably an op amp, such as the LM386.
You'll need a servo, of course, and the requisite circuitry to drive a servo (connecting it straight to the arduino is a good way to get a fried arduino).  I recommend the adafruit motor shield; it has all the drivers on it to safely use servos, steppers and standard DC motors with an arduino: http://www.adafruit.com/products/81
Then of course you'll need a button--a cheap momentary SPST will work.
And of course you'll need all the passive components needed to make all this work, like biasing resistors for your transistor or op amp, capacitors for power stability and smaller capacitors for your amplifier, a pullup resistor for your button, etc.



The link for the aruino with  the servo is there a way to get this to hold two servos?

Basically I would like this board to control two seperate servos for basically a left and right side.  Also have them move at the same time.  Thanks for the quick start guys, I'm gonna start getting parts ordered this week :)

kd7eir

That driver board is configured to drive two servos.

xolroc

Keep in mind that that motor shield only comes as a kit; you'll need to solder on a few components yourself.

And while you're ordering, pick up a pack of resistors (~500-1000) and miscellaneous capacitors (~400-800); you'll be glad you did. (if the resistors are more than about a cent each it's a ripoff!)  A couple diodes and a few potentiometers are always nice to have, as is a cheap voltage regulator.  Transistors and op amps are practically required!  A pack of ~50 miscellaneous LEDs would be a good idea too, and don't forget wire and a breadboard.  If you like, a few transducers like speakers, LDRs, thermocouples, thermistors, etc. are nice to have too.

That's just what I usually recommend to people starting out in electronics; by no means is any of this exact.  Just some things that are handy to have!

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