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Topic: HELP! Is my LCD broken? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

floresta

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Yes, and I couldn't find anything.

You have to be able to pick out what to search for, in this case 'UC-16202'.

I found one 'datasheet' here www.britestone.com/shop/upload/DN/LCD/UC-16202.pdf but all it does is confirm that the connections etc. are similar to all the other LCD modules that are around.


Don

Racerdude24

#6
Jun 24, 2012, 03:01 pm Last Edit: Feb 07, 2013, 12:31 pm by Racerdude24 Reason: 1



Also, I have some ribbon cable similar to the type that you are using.  Mine does not really make secure contact with the breadboard so that may be an additional problem in your case as well.


Don

Nah, that's not the problem. I used a multimeter to check the resistance between the top of the ribbon and another wire, it was fine

Remove all of the wires except those going to pins 1, 2, and 3 and then put pressure on the black frame around the glass.  If you get the expected single row of blocks then you have a poor connection between the display itself and the PC board.  

Yeah, I tried that, I got the single row SOMETIMES when I pressed it, however the squares looked like there was a line moving from bottom to top when I pressed it.
You will notice several places where tabs from that frame protrude through the PC board and you can try twisting them some more to tighten the connection.  You may have to melt some solder first.



I tried that, but it STILL didn't work! What do you mean by "melt some solder"?

floresta

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I used a multimeter to check the resistance between the top of the ribbon and another wire, it was fine.

Your problem is intermittent.  At some times it may be fine and at other times not so fine.

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What do you mean by "melt some solder"

Some boards may have the tabs secured by a blob of solder.

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The Pic shows that I am using 3.3v, but beforehand I was using 5v

I forgot about this part.  What made you switch to 3.3 Volts?  Most LCD modules require at least 4.5 Volts or so and we now know that this one does as well.  The data sheet also indicates that pin 3 should typically be at about 0.5 Volts.

Don

Racerdude24


What made you switch to 3.3 Volts?  Most LCD modules require at least 4.5 Volts or so and we now know that this one does as well.  The data sheet also indicates that pin 3 should typically be at about 0.5 Volts.

I changed it back because of the "data sheet" you sent me. I at first I thought that 5v may be overpowering it, so I changed it. Yet it works with neither.  :(

Racerdude24

Okay, I realized something. The LCD doesn't show anything unless I accidentally short a connection on the back. So in that case it might have nothing to do with the frame. (face palm)

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