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Topic: what's inside a micro controller? (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

mohitgupta322

I wanted to know which components are there in micro controller and how they work and also what work they do in microcontroller  ? please explain or give links that provide the theory regarding it.
please do not explain in too technical language and if u want to use any technical term please explain it. And yes I am just a newbie at electronics.........
THNX a lot. :)

James C4S

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

Jack Christensen


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller


Once you read that article, click on the first link in the article that is not in parentheses or italics, read that article, then repeat. You will eventually get to Philosophy, at which point you should have a good grasp on microcontrollers and most everything else. Feel free to take side trips by clicking any link for a term that is too technical, but be sure to backtrack and follow the main chain of articles as described above.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

mohitgupta322

@jack

thnx for directing me what to read first in wikipedia.....i was so confused but now i really have some image of microcontroller and now can understand how can they be so small

Bobnova



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller


Once you read that article, click on the first link in the article that is not in parentheses or italics, read that article, then repeat. You will eventually get to Philosophy, at which point you should have a good grasp on microcontrollers and most everything else. Feel free to take side trips by clicking any link for a term that is too technical, but be sure to backtrack and follow the main chain of articles as described above.

Intrigued, I tried this. It actually narrowly avoids philosophy and goes into a loop centered around the Mediterranean, language and biology.
Before you get to that loop there is a significant amount of useful electronics information though.

Yes, I do realize it's a bit of an old topic.

kf2qd

Actually, inside any microcontroller is SAND. Very refined sand....

CrossRoads

Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
Arduino for Teens available at Amazon.com.

Jack Christensen




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller


Once you read that article, click on the first link in the article that is not in parentheses or italics, read that article, then repeat. You will eventually get to Philosophy, at which point you should have a good grasp on microcontrollers and most everything else. Feel free to take side trips by clicking any link for a term that is too technical, but be sure to backtrack and follow the main chain of articles as described above.

Intrigued, I tried this. It actually narrowly avoids philosophy and goes into a loop centered around the Mediterranean, language and biology.
Before you get to that loop there is a significant amount of useful electronics information though.

Yes, I do realize it's a bit of an old topic.


I got to philosophy by the path below. Remember to click the first link that is not italics or in parens.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_circuit
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_circuit
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resistor
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passivity_(engineering)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analog_electronics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physics
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_science
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fact
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proof_(truth)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy

MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

RPCoyle

Quote

I got to philosophy by the path below. Remember to click the first link that is not italics or in parens.

But what's cool is that,if you are a philosopher, you might be able to work backwards and learn to design microprocessors!

CrossRoads

"if you are a philosopher, you might be able to work backwards and learn to design microprocessors! "

Ha ha, not likely!  Not unless that philosopher also went to engineering school :)
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
Arduino for Teens available at Amazon.com.

majenko

A microcontroller is made up of 2 things.

About 70% of it is melted sand.  The other 30% is highly compressed Magic Smoke™.

It's the Magic Smoke™ that actually does the work.  The sand forms a number of microscopic tubes (they use tiny weeny worms to tunnel them out), and the Magic Smoke™ is piped along them.
Get 10% off all 4D Systems TFT screens this month: use discount code MAJENKO10

Verdris


Quote

I got to philosophy by the path below. Remember to click the first link that is not italics or in parens.

But what's cool is that,if you are a philosopher, you might be able to work backwards and learn to design microprocessors!


Hard to do while they're busy taking my coffee order!

smeezekitty



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller


Once you read that article, click on the first link in the article that is not in parentheses or italics, read that article, then repeat. You will eventually get to Philosophy, at which point you should have a good grasp on microcontrollers and most everything else. Feel free to take side trips by clicking any link for a term that is too technical, but be sure to backtrack and follow the main chain of articles as described above.

I know this is old and off topic but I would like to note that I find I can make my way to philosophy using that method using almost any article as a starting point.
Avoid throwing electronics out as you or someone else might need them for parts or use.
Solid state rectifiers are the only REAL rectifiers.
Resistors for LEDS!

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