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Topic: A really useful Arduino (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

Constantin

As nice as this option seems in theory, the main issue is one of the impact it could have on measurements and the like. Try using an ADC while even a small LED (i.e. like the 3mA 0805 models from Osram) are pulling off current. Thanks but no thanks. Those that need lights to know what the status of an output is have yet to learn how to use a multi-meter I guess. My recommendation for the folk who want to do this on the cheap is to buy a RBBB from modern devices and put it in a breadboard, along with the requisite LEDs and resistors.

No, in my mind a much better modification to the Uno is the Ruggeduino from Rugged Circuits. Great concept and excellent work regarding detecting all the possible means of frying an Arduino and ways to mitigate said risk. But note that the impact on signals due to the Zeners and other protective aspects are mostly minimal.

drjiohnsmith

the rugged uni has saved me more than once,

now when / if the rugged mega come out,
    things will only get better.

but then well want the rugged 32 bit version !

CrossRoads

" It would still be better than connecting the LEDs directly (as on the Uno does on its pin 13)."
Uno no longer does that -
http://arduino.cc/en/uploads/Main/Arduino_Uno_Rev3-schematic.pdf
D13 LED now driven by the other comparator in the LM358.
I have answered questions about why the L LED is on because of that.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
Arduino for Teens available at Amazon.com.

tim7


Try using an ADC while even a small LED (i.e. like the 3mA 0805 models from Osram) are pulling off current. Thanks but no thanks.


Constantin, that's not what I'm suggesting.  Take a closer look at my message.

Quote

Those that need lights to know what the status of an output is have yet to learn how to use a multi-meter I guess.


Ahem.  Some people have yet to learn how to use lights I guess ;)
With LEDs you get to monitor all channels (20 on an Arduino) simultaneously. They respond quickly, so you can see when communication channels are active.  And they're small and cheap, so they're convenient to put in and may be left installed permanently or semi-permanently.

Constantin

My bad and apologies for misinterpreting. That said, a shield still seems more appropriate for the application you're describing. Protecting inputs seems like a better use of board space for beginners. But opinions are free to differ. Fwiw, I find it easier to debug via the serial channel since it allows me to not only debug inputs and outputs, but also review responses to same.

Imo, an inexpensive way to implement what you're describing is using an RBBB with a breadboard and LEDs on the channels in question. Makes for an easy development environment and insures that one keeps track of the channels being used.

I too like to use LEDs to keep track of certain channels (serial, among others) in boards i design but certainly not all channels. At some point it becomes confusing to have tons of channels blinking.

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