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Topic: how to make three-dimensional objects completely touch sensitive (Read 6 times) previous topic - next topic

focalist

Also a quick search of ebay turned up these:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/FSR400-Force-Sensitive-Resistor-Force-Sensor-/220923419046?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item33700fd9a6



Looks like the perfect thing, even looks like it's flexible tape mounting.  Get yourself a bunch of these or similar.. same idea as making your own, 'cept someone else who knows how to do it, did it.

Expensive if you need a lot of them though..
When the testing is complete there will be... cake.

focalist

When the testing is complete there will be... cake.

EVP

mm, it would be easer if it was made of some kind of plastic. Then you could just paint multiple conducive areas in it. I think you might run into problems if you have to many, Atmel do a chip for multi dimensional conductive arrays and it sorts out a lot of the cross talk for you. I am going to tackle one when i have the time, i thought of using transparent conducive plastic layered with non conduction transparent plastic and then all put through a laminator to make transparent-ish conductive switched. Anyway your object is metal mmm. lot's of small microphones and some fancy code? piezo microphones stuck to the inside?

focalist

The load cells are metal, but the pressure sensitive resistors are flexible thin film.
When the testing is complete there will be... cake.

starsraindown

great, thank you all for you ideas. i will have to figure out now if I want some really sophisticated solution with with a lot of coding and stuff or just to try to make it as simple as possible. conductive paint would definately be a pretty simple and convenient solution. but If it is possible to create a whole metal sculpture out of a square (or rectangular) base surface, capacitive sensoring would probably be possible. (it would be like a folded touchscreen). it is also a very "organic" way of sensoring, considering that the nervous system also works with electrical impulses &  fields.

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