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Topic: RGB LED help? == noob (Read 610 times) previous topic - next topic

BIGRABBIT

So, I am currently building a RGB LED cube 4x4x4 with rainbowduino. I have yet to even look at the code for this project, but I am currently beginning to build the cube.

I don't have a LED tester or anything, and not to sure of another way of testing my LED's to see if they are in working condition before I begin to solder.

I have a arduino uno and enough parts to be able to quickly set up the light on a breadboard and check if it working while RGB is all on, and also individual colour (Red, Green, Blue). I am curious as to how exactly the code would look like for this?

(I am fully open to better suggestions as to how I could test my LED's as my subject reads I am quite new to this)

Thanks for the help!

Osgeld

dont really need code to test LED's just use some resistors (470ohm-ish) and the 5 volt output of the arduino

also most multimeters in continuity mode will provide enough current to dimly light up most LED's

Boffin1

You would probably be wise to start with the "blink" example, and work up from there. ( as most of us newbies have )

Its easier to spot a typing error in the simpler sketches.

You can connect a LED ( through 270 ohm resistor) from any output pin to ground for testing.
With my mobile phone I can call people and talk to them -  how smart can you get ?

BIGRABBIT

Ha.., embarrassing! Thanks, a lot both of you. :D

april

If you plug them in a breadboard and put the cathode to ground on the arduino and put a wire in the 3.3Volt arduino outlet. Touch the wire which is now positive to each anode of the rgb just quickly  . No resistor needed as the output is very low

fungus


I have a arduino uno and enough parts to be able to quickly set up the light on a breadboard and check if it working while RGB is all on, and also individual colour (Red, Green, Blue). I am curious as to how exactly the code would look like for this?


Why do you need "code"? Use a piece of wire and a resistor. Touch the legs on the LED with the wire.

No, I don't answer questions sent in private messages (but I do accept thank-you notes...)

Hippynerd

A battery and resistor are the easiest way to test the LEDs. It looks like that kit doesnt come with any resistors, but does include a constant current LED driver, so you may want to hook up 8 LEDs, edit the code to only control 8, then try it out (you may have to try many things before you figure out how to get 8 to run properly. After you have that setup, you can swap out the 8 RGB LEDs and test the new ones.

Alternatively, you could get some inexpensive shift registers, and run shiftpwm to test out 8 LEDs at a time.

Goofing around like this will delay your project, but your chances of learning things is much greater than if you simply follow directions.

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