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Topic: My relay is clicking but it's not "activating" (Read 438 times) previous topic - next topic

Grumpy_Mike

The dots are joints between the component's terminals and the connecting wire.

If the relay clicks it means the contacts are opening and closing. It it doesn't work then either the circuit is not wired like you think or the circuit on the contacts side is wrong. Clicking equals working as far as the relay is concerned.

Graynomad

#16
Sep 21, 2016, 12:44 pm Last Edit: Sep 21, 2016, 12:45 pm by Graynomad
Quote
In that image what is the dot in the center of the rectangle with a vertical line and why does it not have anything attached to it?
Most relays have NO (Normally Open) and NC (Normally Closed) connections, in that pic the NC connection is the one on the right and the thing you're referring to is the NO connection. The thick bar at 45 degrees represents the internal leaf contact that flips between the NC and NO when power is applied to the coil.
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

dlloyd

#17
Sep 22, 2016, 02:20 pm Last Edit: Sep 22, 2016, 02:22 pm by dlloyd
Below, COM is top center pin, NO is lower right pin, NC is lower left pin

Notice that the same symbol for the relay contacts shown on schematic is conveniently imprinted in the plastic. The COM to NC is shown as being shorted, which is the condition when the relay is off.
Usually the COM and NO terminals would be used to switch the load (doorbell).

Try drawing a circuit or describe how you plan to make connections to the relay contacts, battery and doorbell.

INTP

Go watch some animations on how a relay works.
The "schematic funny shapes" for a relay are literally demonstrative of how it works. Spiraly thing gets powered and magnetized, magnetic force pulls bold black line to the left so the bottom end of it moves from the right dot to the left dot. Top point of the bold black line is a pivot.

OldSteve

Spiraly thing
I always wondered what they were called. Thanks for enlightening me. :D
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

INTP

Maybe you see intestinal villi or a french tickler. All depends on what kinds of things you're familiar with  :)

OldSteve

Maybe you see intestinal villi or a french tickler. All depends on what kinds of things you're familiar with  :)
I'm not saying anything. :)
Please do not PM me for help. I am not a personal consultant.
And others will benefit as well if you post your question publicly on the forums.

pillar

Thank you all for the insight.  I will be trying this again soon and I will post any questions you might have.

One thing I'm still not clear on though - will it work at all with the 3.7V on the "switch" side?  Or does that side need 5V too?

Graynomad

Quote
will it work at all with the 3.7V on the "switch" side?  Or does that side need 5V too?
The contacts will have their own voltage and current ratings and they are totally independent of the coil's ratings. So unless this is the lowest-voltage relay in human history I would say it's just fine to switch 3v7. Do you have the specs for the relay? That will tell you.
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

pillar

So I took your advice and read up on how relays work and decided to try it out on it's own without the arduino to make sure I understood it.  I also cracked off one of the contacts (common) so I decided to solder leads to all the relay pins.

Long story short I got it to work with the battery and the bell, but using a simple switch rather than the arduino to activated the coil.  With that done I think I'll be able to get it to work with the Arduino.

Thank you all for your help and here is a video or my very amateur contraption.

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