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Topic: Using an ATX power supply (Read 3787 times) previous topic - next topic

tk26


The biggest problem with such a supply is the fact that without modification (not an easy task unless you have a schematic for the supply and are an "expert" in power supply design) you can't set a current limit for a given voltage.


I'm wondering about this though, can't I just stick a current limiter in front of the component?

cr0sh



The biggest problem with such a supply is the fact that without modification (not an easy task unless you have a schematic for the supply and are an "expert" in power supply design) you can't set a current limit for a given voltage.


I'm wondering about this though, can't I just stick a current limiter in front of the component?



Yeah - you probably could; but at a certain point you're going to end up with a "franken-psu" and will probably spend as much money (in time, if nothing else) building it, and ending up with a less capable device than if you had simple purchased a bench PSU. Then again, you will have likely learned a lot by doing so, so you could factor that in. What is your goal? A power supply for your projects that will be reliable and accurate, and safe; or is it to learn how power supplies work and how to build them?
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

jens38


.... What is your goal? A power supply for your projects that will be reliable and accurate, and safe; or is it to learn how power supplies work and how to build them?


You made the point: For sure it's more expensive (mainly if you calculate the time) to build it yourself (but
don't tell it my wife, please 8)), and you end up with something not so performant than the same thing out of the box, but the reason why I'm playing with the Arduino is that I love the learning effect, and I have to admit that most of my projects becomes boring, just when they are finished.    The journey is the reward.


aka *frenchi*

Dell Latitude E5510
Arduino Duemilanove
Arduino Uno (2x)
Dog
Cat (2x)

ADLC

I totally agree with all you ... my adapted PSU is pure shit, and I have expend several weeks simply trying to understand how a switching power supply works (and more specifically a PC one) ... but I have learn a lot!! :-)
(and I'm quite pride of my Frankistein!)

8)
Vinciduino rocks!

mauried

This article may be of some interest.
http://www.pavouk.org/hw/en_atxps.html

This is the circuit of a common ATX power supply.
It uses a TL494 switcher chip which was / still is a very common control chip for these types of power supplies.
As long as the power supply you wish to convert has this chip or a similar one , irs pretty easy to make the output adjustable.
The 5V and 12V rails are regulated, but as there is only main transformer the outputs of the 2 rails are not totally independant.

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