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Author Topic: Stepper motor setup for Unimat Classic type tools.  (Read 195 times)
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I suppose I could use a motor or double gear setup but ...

I have an arduino Mega 25** and the arduino motor shield. I have purchased one of these small multi-role tools for working on acrylic but they don't seam to be able to go below 12000 rpms the idea of adding a stepper motor to the setup makes me think that it could be a worth while upgrade but I have a few questions.

1, What sort of stepper would I need to run down to 300 rpm's and what kind of force can I expect from a stepper at this speed.
2, will the motor shield be able to handle the job I intend it to do?
3, where on earth did I put my MKIII uno?
4, would the mega be able to drive 3 axis?
5, should I dump the shield and use the Poulolo drivers and if so.
6 what combination should I get?
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A stepper is unlikely to be the correct choice for driving a tool bit. Among other things 300rpm is quite fast for a stepper motor. And they are likely to be too "jerky" to give a good finish.

A regular DC motor with reduction gearing would be much more suitable. Machine tools with speed control usually have a system to maintain a constant speed as the load on the tool changes. That probably requires some sort of feedback mechanism.

Can you provide a link to the Unimat tool you have?

Can you explain in more detail what you want to do. Your comment about the 12000 rpm motor probably has nothing to do with multiple axis control so the whole post is a bit confusing. This is essential before any guidance about types of motor etc can be given.

You will need stepper motors if you plan to control tool positions and you should use proper stepper motor drivers such as the Pololu A4988 (which may or may not suit your motors).

A Mega or Uno can easily control 3 axes but a lot may depend on how much computation is needed to interpret the movement instructions.

Are you aware of GRBL (use Google).

The MKIII Uno is in the last place you left it (unless you employ a cleaner).

...R
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A stepper is unlikely to be the correct choice for driving a tool bit. Among other things 300rpm is quite fast for a stepper motor. And they are likely to be too "jerky" to give a good finish.

A regular DC motor with reduction gearing would be much more suitable. Machine tools with speed control usually have a system to maintain a constant speed as the load on the tool changes. That probably requires some sort of feedback mechanism.

Can you provide a link to the Unimat tool you have?

Can you explain in more detail what you want to do. Your comment about the 12000 rpm motor probably has nothing to do with multiple axis control so the whole post is a bit confusing. This is essential before any guidance about types of motor etc can be given.
Thats wierd, I read that in the nema 17 specs on ebay but I havent seen it on any other post.
Also the power motor of the tool runs at 12,800 66w 12v.
I was hoping that a 300rpm stepper existed and was better the a geared motor running at 300rpm.


You will need stepper motors if you plan to control tool positions and you should use proper stepper motor drivers such as the Pololu A4988 (which may or may not suit your motors).

A Mega or Uno can easily control 3 axes but a lot may depend on how much computation is needed to interpret the movement instructions.

Are you aware of GRBL (use Google).

I looked at the ramps board should I decide to go cnc.
Nope, cnc is new stuff for me to explore. but just googled ans started reading.
The MKIII Uno is in the last place you left it (unless you employ a cleaner).
...R
Thanks, now I just wish I could remember where that was.
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Cnc routing of acrylic can be difficult to get acceptable results and tool coolant is essential.
Post routing the acrylic will also need annealing, especially if you want to glue it.
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Cnc routing of acrylic can be difficult to get acceptable results and tool coolant is essential.
Post routing the acrylic will also need annealing, especially if you want to glue it.

I tend to "Lap" the service to get a perfectly smooth finish before polishing and glueing. The device will be mostly for turning acrylic but semi accurate routing will be wonderful.
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I forgot to mention that "nema 17" is just the specification for the size of the front face of the motor and its connecting screw holes. It doesn't say anything about the power of the motor.

...R
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