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Topic: What do you guys use? (Read 2123 times) previous topic - next topic

Osgeld



Same here. I wish I could go back to DOS.


Heh. Well, you can always try out FreeDOS. Or DOSBox. Or DOSEMU.

I've been running Linux as my main home OS since Aug, 1998.


heck MS dos runs fine on modern computers, its not going to deal with multigig SATA hard drives or piles of ram, but I have installed it on a old laptop drive for my retro computers using a PhenomII and it runs quite quick
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

P18F4550

Windows 7 on my netbook, Ubuntu on my laptop, XP on my desktop.

IDE_0018 is useable on windows 7 but 1.0.1 is laboriously slow on win7
funny though 1.0.1 is pretty nippy on Ubuntu

for years i was using win 98se and had no hassle at all,

XP is good all round for the Arduino, PIC & Nintendo Gameboy programming i do

wizdum

I bounce between Windows 7, CentOS, and Fedora. I have an Ubuntu VM, but I don't use it for much.
"Anyone who isn't confused really doesn't understand the situation."

Electronic props for Airsoft, paintball, and laser tag -> www.nightscapetech.com

cr0sh


Same here. I wish I could go back to DOS.


Other than lack of (new) apps or time - what's stopping you? If you want to have some fun, check out FreeDOS...

I have a plan to, at some point (hopefully soon, if it will ever cool off here in Phoenix) to take some of my older hardware and repurpose it into "ultimate machines of the era" - basically take the best parts I have for the "era" of the machine, and build the best box I can for that era. So - DOS/Win 3.1 era, then Win 95/98 era - I might even create an NT4 box as well. I also plan on building a 386 box for running old DOS games and graphics demos...


BTW: For those of you who remember the MITS Altair 8800 kit back in the 70's, I just got my brand new kit of an 8800 'emulated remake' from Briel Computers, called the Altair 8800Micro. With a front panel with toggle switches, LED's an all. It uses an Atmega8515 to emulate the Intel 8080A (or 8080B), including the single cycle stepping for each instruction. It sells for under $225 bucks (a bargain for such a great memory). This will be a fun project for me, running 8K or 16K Altair Basic (by Bill Gates) again, and with an add on board also CP/M will be a great experience. Unfortunately I sold my old Altair 8800 PC; BIG MISTAKE!!!    :( 

http://www.brielcomputers.com/    (Vince Briel)

When I have it working, I will try to see how Arduino could improve my new Altair 8800Micro or viceversa. This is a nice kit, good for bringing sweet memories back.   8)


I've wanted to try that kit ever since I got my mits - ;) - on an Altair 8800 I found at a local electronic junkyard for a song (it needs a ton of restoration work - it came with the Z-80 "upgrade", I don't have the original 8080 cpu card). You'll have to let me know how it works out. I've wanted to restore my Altair to "museum condition" and get it running again (I am, unfortunately, missing the top cover, and the company that made the case stopped making it and threw away the plans (!) about a year before I found mine - so I'll probably have to have that custom made for some huge $$$) - and somehow get it connected to the internet (likely via some kind of serial interface; fortunately, it came with a serial/parallel interface board - assuming it works, of course).

Have you seen this other kit?

http://www.altairkit.com/

I'm not sure how much it costs - it certainly doesn't look as easy to purchase as the Briel kit - you have to email for a newsletter and more detail, and then there's a way to get put on a "holding list" for your turn to come up to get your own kit (seems like some kind of "labor of love" thing). Probably isn't cheap (or quick), though the machine does look more "full sized".

I should probably just stick to getting my Altair running again instead...

:D
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

cr0sh

Oh - and just for the record I currently run Ubuntu 10.04 LTS on my main box; it is starting to get a little long in the tooth (both the OS and the machine). When I do get around to an upgrade, I'll probably switch to Mint or something else - not sure what, but I don't really like the direction Ubuntu has gone recently. I've been running Linux in some fashion or another since 1995 or so; for my current work we using Macbook Pro's with Lion installed (other places I've used Ubuntu and Windows of various flavors). Never used anything later than 98SE at home, though, when it comes to Windows installs (and that particular box was squirreled away in my server closet and accessed via VNC because I was running an edition of Quicken I needed for bill paying - I've since dropped that).
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

fkeel

meh - I miss my windowsXP.
http://embodimentlabs.tumblr.com/
http://paulstrohmeier.info/

justjed




Same here. I wish I could go back to DOS.


Heh. Well, you can always try out FreeDOS. Or DOSBox. Or DOSEMU.

I've been running Linux as my main home OS since Aug, 1998.


heck MS dos runs fine on modern computers, its not going to deal with multigig SATA hard drives or piles of ram, but I have installed it on a old laptop drive for my retro computers using a PhenomII and it runs quite quick


Well, I suspect he might not have those old disks lying around. Heck, as much of a packrat as I am (and there are folks here who put me to shame in that regard :) ), even I don't have DOS disks. And lots of machines these days don't have floppy drives either. Running DOS in a VM is a good solution here.
... it is poor civic hygiene to install technologies that could someday
facilitate a police state. -- Bruce Schneier

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