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Topic: Warning! One Million Ohms (Read 7946 times) previous topic - next topic

kg4wsv

Quote
From a purely economic standpoint, the ATtiny85 makes sense.


eh?  Assuming simple blinking it the desired functionality, a 555 is  $0.41, an ATtiny85 is  $1.18  (qty 1, digikey).

The 555 needs a few passives (less than $0.77 worth, I'd wager) and requires more assembly work (which could be viewed as an advantage, for a kit).

-j

Jack Christensen


Quote
From a purely economic standpoint, the ATtiny85 makes sense.


eh?  Assuming simple blinking it the desired functionality, a 555 is  $0.41, an ATtiny85 is  $1.18  (qty 1, digikey).

The 555 needs a few passives (less than $0.77 worth, I'd wager) and requires more assembly work (which could be viewed as an advantage, for a kit).

-j



I meant to duplicate the same functionality as my circuit. There are six flashing patterns, three speeds, automatic power-down after five minutes...
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

kg4wsv

Ah, so not "simple blinking". :)

-j

Jack Christensen


Ah, so not "simple blinking". :)

-j



Haha, yeah maybe just a little fancier blinking ;)  Anyway I figure that given the somewhat frivolous nature of the project, maybe frivolous use of a microcontroller sorta fits in :D
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

BlueJakester

#19
Sep 07, 2012, 01:35 pm Last Edit: Sep 07, 2012, 04:46 pm by BlueJakester Reason: 1
Here's mine, thanks Jack!  These boards are a lot of fun. I took mine to work and everyone there got a big kick out of it.

Regarding the kit: It's very easy to assemble. It took me about 10 minutes. The PCB is very sturdy and the silkscreen printing is clear and sharp. The hardware is excellent. I didn't expect a battery holder or power terminal blocks, but they were included. Everything you need is right there in the kit. The instructions are more than adequate with photos and wiring diagram on the downloadable PDF. You can add the headers for ICSP programmer if you want to tinker with the code, or re-program it all together. Jack has put the code up on GitHub for anyone who wants it. Nicely done Jack!

The use of button input and sleeping the ATtiny85 are nicely implemented in the code and I learned from reading through it. But there are already several different blink patterns with different timing, so I haven't felt the need to tinker with it yet. It's really cool as is!

I've ordered more of these as gifts for friends. I have several friends that are near impossible to find holiday gifts for. A couple of them are into electronics too. So these make a unique and affordable gift that is certain to entertain.

Lastly, Jack is a pleasure to deal with. Many of you already know of him from his posts in the forums here. I have asked Jack a couple of follow-up questions regarding things I didn't understand (in the microcontroller forum) and he went out of his way to help me. Thank you Jack!



Here is a short video I made with my iPhone that shows some of the blinking patterns. You simply press the button to change the pattern, which I do several times in the clip. Press and hold the button to power off, or it goes to sleep after 5 minutes:

YouTube: http://youtu.be/GAgEru5UjlU

Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/49014569

Jack Christensen

@BlueJakester, thanks for the props, you are too kind! I'll pay you later $)


Jack is a pleasure to deal with.


THAT depends on who you talk to XD
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Lakes

Fun Project, and yes, I`m another that was not aware of this "joke"

Make a Deluxe Model with the option to add more LED`s.

Super Deluxe Model with waveshield and PIR sensor. :D

UnaClocker


I sanded off a small patch of solder mask, tinned the copper with a very large iron, then soldered on a clip from a pin. You can now wear this unit on your shirt. It looks great. :)
I also substituted the dim red led's with surface mount blue LED's. :) Don't have a picture of that at the moment, though.
Brian from Tacoma, WA
Arduino evangelist - since Dec, 2010.

Jack Christensen

#23
Sep 14, 2012, 05:14 pm Last Edit: Sep 14, 2012, 05:20 pm by Jack Christensen Reason: 1

I sanded off a small patch of solder mask, tinned the copper with a very large iron, then soldered on a clip from a pin. You can now wear this unit on your shirt. It looks great. :)
I also substituted the dim red led's with surface mount blue LED's. :) Don't have a picture of that at the moment, though.


Hey that's great! How about a picture of you wearing it? Sorry if you were disappointed with the LEDs, I thought they were actually quite bright. These are the LEDs I'm shipping in the kit.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

UnaClocker

Nah, I wouldn't say I was disappointed with them per say. I just prefer the clear lens LED's as you can generally tell when they are or aren't on in broad daylight. I hadn't powered these up yet, but after having done that, they do put out a good amount of light for desktop use.
Here's a picture of my 10 yr old son wearing it, he soldered it together himself. I bought the kit for him to solder, as I've been looking for something novel like this for him to get more soldering experience on.

Thanks for the great kit.
Brian from Tacoma, WA
Arduino evangelist - since Dec, 2010.

BlueJakester

UnaClocker,

Great pic! That smile is worth a thousand words  :D  Congrats to your son for soldering the kit together. It would indeed make a good project for youngsters to gain more soldering experience.

Jake

Jack Christensen

@UnaClocker, excellent, I love it! That is a proud kid, and rightly so, pretty good for 10 years old! Be sure and give him a high-five for me!
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

april

I'm wondering if you could put an insulated  safety pin on the front too so it only works when the safety pin is hooked up?

Jack Christensen


I'm wondering if you could put an insulated  safety pin on the front too so it only works when the safety pin is hooked up?


I suppose. Might require circuit board mods of one type or another.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

UnaClocker

I think if I were to make a couple mods for wearability, they'd be a slightly smaller size, a square of bare tinned space so the solder mask doesn't have to be sanded off for the clip, and a coin cell holder on the back, as the battery pack is a problem when you're wearing it. I'm just going to glue a coin cell holder to the back of this one and wire it in. But the joy of an open source design is, I need some more practice with Eagle. I can fire up the open files that are provided, and make those changes.
Brian from Tacoma, WA
Arduino evangelist - since Dec, 2010.

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