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Topic: Teensy 3.0 (Read 38806 times) previous topic - next topic

westfw

Well, Paul seems to be particularly circumspect in tooting his own horn, so I thought I'd mention this for him:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulstoffregen/teensy-30-32-bit-arm-cortex-m4-usable-in-arduino-a

Based on a Freescale Kinetis Cortex M4 microcontoller (ARM with DSP extensions.)  128k flash.

retrolefty

Wow, very impressive project/product. Thanks for posting, I made a pledge.


Lefty

TonyD

Cool a Cortex-M4 stamp

PaulS

Quote
Wow, very impressive project/product. Thanks for posting, I made a pledge.

Me, too.

48X24X48X

Freescale are also coming up with a $13 Arduino form factor board using the same series ARM.

But, I'm sure Paul's work on the software side is the winner!

Jantje

Thanks for sharin
Looks really cool and real
Best regards
Jantje
Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -

cyclegadget


Quote
Wow, very impressive project/product. Thanks for posting, I made a pledge.

Me, too.


Me, three pretty cool board!
Good links: Eagle tutorial= http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDE1858BD83D19C70
General Arduion tutorials = http://tronixstuff.wordpress.com
http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/bbshowpost.php?bbtopic_id=123

fat16lib

#7
Sep 06, 2012, 03:09 pm Last Edit: Sep 06, 2012, 03:15 pm by fat16lib Reason: 1
I have been using lots of Cortex boards including M4 boards and this is the most elegant board I have seen.

I pledged and can't wait to see the Teensy 3.0.

The Freescale Kinetis processor is an excellent choice.  It's amazing to see that 64 pin part on such a tiny board.  It truly is Teensy.

I hope this mean it will be open enough so I can port a RTOS like ChibiOS to it.
Quote

Teensy 3.0, an affordable 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4 board, for development in Arduino or C/C++.


I have been using ChibiOS and really like having the same RTOS on all boards.

skyjumper

Looks like a great board, but what tool chain will be used to code for it?

fat16lib

#9
Sep 08, 2012, 04:17 pm Last Edit: Sep 08, 2012, 04:47 pm by fat16lib Reason: 1
You should be able to use any tool chain that supports Cortex M4 processors.  

The only problem could be how Paul's boot-loader works on Teensy 3.0.  You need a hook to load you hex file.

The easy way is to use what ever Paul has packaged with his software.  His stuff is always easy to use and reliable.

I am hoping to make ChibiOS a library for Teensy 3.0 using his tools.  That way I can use his tools and have a RTOS.

I did that with the Arduino IDE for AVR processors.

I really like Freescale's documentation.  Here is a good overview of true bare metal use of the device http://cache.freescale.com/files/32bit/doc/quick_ref_guide/KQRUG.pdf.

Jantje


The only problem could be how Paul's boot-loader works on Teensy 3.0.  You need a hook to load you hex file.

This is what the page says about the boot-loader (not sure what it means but it sounds like it does not impact the tool chain 8) )
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Teensy 3.0 features an off-chip bootloader design.  On Teensy 2.0 and all Arduino(R)** brand boards, the bootloader consumes a small portion of the available flash memory.  On most boards, the bootloader executes briefly before your own program.  By storing the bootloader in a separate chip, your code can use all of the flash memory.  Your code can also run immediately after a reset event, without bootloader interference.


Best regards
Jantje
Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -

fat16lib

#11
Sep 08, 2012, 07:16 pm Last Edit: Sep 09, 2012, 03:39 am by fat16lib Reason: 1
I wasn't very clear, I am sure you can generate a hex file with any Cortex M4 tool chain.

Here is my question.   How easy is it to load an arbitrary hex file?

I read this also
Quote

Teensy 3.0 features an off-chip bootloader design.  On Teensy 2.0 and all Arduino(R)** brand boards, the bootloader consumes a small portion of the available flash memory.  On most boards, the bootloader executes briefly before your own program.  By storing the bootloader in a separate chip, your code can use all of the flash memory.  Your code can also run immediately after a reset event, without bootloader interference.


I wonder how you start the boot loader?

My guess is that the button copies the boot-loader into RAM.  The boot-loader can then program all flash.

Perhaps the boot-loader uses FlexMemory.  I don't have a clear understanding of FlexMemory.

The next question is how do you send the hex file to the boot-loader?

Jantje

All
Paul has been pledged $58,442. That is 11 times the requested amount.
He will be busy the next months  ]:D

Best regards
Jantje
Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -

pico

If anyone here has any experience with the Leaflab Maple boards, you will know what a massive undertaking the porting of much of the AVR-based Arduino code over to the ARM architecture is. The Leaflab boards are great little Cortex-3 prototyping boards, with an Arduino derived IDE and a "wirish" port of the basic wiring stuff, but much of the promise of the hardware (DMA, advanced interrupt handling etc.) even to this day has yet to be really fully realised because of the at times painfully slow rate of porting across (or creation from scratch) of many of the libs we take for granted on the Arduino.

I have developed using the Maple boards, and to be honest, despite the raw hardware advantages, the Mega2560 is in many ways far more capable prototyping platform, apart from some niche applications. As a sage once said, "it's the software, stupid."

So, recent history ponts to where the challenge is. Building a good ARM dev board -- certainly not trivial, but pales into comparison to the effort required in building a complete software development environment that would be comparable to the Arduino ecosystem.

Having said all this, I might add I'm not surprised that the announced "team Arduino" development effort for an ARM based Arduino product is today a year old -- and not a public beta release in sight.

So good luck to Paul. But he's going to need more than good luck -- he's also going to need considerable community support if this platform is really going to take off.
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westfw

Mine has shown up and is blinking (and the IDE works, so I've modified the blink rate and whatnot, and it uploads/etc.)  I've soldered pins on "upside down" for easier access to the extra backside signals, although this hides the reset button and I'll have to remember to be really careful when trying to remove the board from the protoboard.
Pretty cool.  It's very tiny (teensy!)


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