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Topic: Comfort measurement (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

AWOL

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Concentrations of carbon monoxide in a room can make it uncomfortable. In a permanent way.

Ditto CO2
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

elQuero

#11
Sep 07, 2012, 10:14 am Last Edit: Sep 09, 2012, 09:39 pm by elQuero Reason: 1
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Isn't the biggest problem here that 'comfort' is entirely subjective?

For avoiding this problem I assumed that
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This device is like a knick-knack for living room

therefore there won't often be people without same habits.

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NOT "CO"; you should be detecting "CO2".

I don't know. Concentrations of carbon monoxide in a room can make it uncomfortable. In a permanent way.
Ditto CO2

Maybe I should check both XD

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I understand from your answer that i should detect also lack of oxygen, and for detecting them i should detect the CO level. But can CO form multiple layers based on height? If yes i should detect it at more heights...


NOT "CO"; you should be detecting "CO2".

Air temperature can vary with height and position, but it seems unlikely to me that you will find significant variations in concentrations of the different gases throughout a room, unless you have a really concentrated source (gas lamp, candle etc).

Well, in that question I was talking about CO, not the other parameters. I know that they can vary, but I also share your opinion that height variations for some parameters (like temperature, brightness, noise, etc) are negligible.
But gases may stratify and make the room uncomfortable: they can't be easly detected by humans, so this device might warn you before you fall asleep! I'm in the wrong way?

PeterH


Well, in that question I was talking about CO, not the other parameters. I know that they can vary, but I also share your opinion that height variations for some parameters (like temperature, brightness, noise, etc) are negligible.
But gases may stratify and make the room uncomfortable: they can't be easly detected by humans, so this device might warn you before you fall asleep! I'm in the wrong way?


The quotes have got messed up somewhere, I hope I'm quoting you correctly. I think your comment above is the exact opposite of what I am saying.

CO is worth monitoring only so that you can sound an alarm if the level exceeds a (very low) threshold. It has nothing to do with comfort - CO will kill you without making you feel uncomfortable.

CO2 makes the room feel stale. It is worth monitoring as one of your comfort indicators.

I do not expect CO or CO2 concentration to vary from place to place within the room, except near a very concentrated source such as a flame.

I would expect temperature to vary throughout the room and to vary with height too. It is entirely normal and expected that the room will have hot and cold spots and these will affect the comfort.

Light levels obviously vary through the room and this will affect the comfort.
I only provide help via the forum - please do not contact me for private consultancy.

wildbill

This sounds like a fun project, but I'm not sure what you'll do with the "comfort" data once you have it. A CO alarm would be useful, but I wouldn't want to rely only on a home built solution for that.

It reminds me of a question I heard asked of a dive computer salesman - "The computer captures the water temp, why doesn't it display it during a dive?". The answer was basically "You know when you're cold so we don't spam you with data you don't need". Similarly here, you know if you're comfortable, so what are you trying to get from the device?

If the reason for doing it is "Because I can", then that's fair enough of course.

elQuero

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The quotes have got messed up somewhere, I hope I'm quoting you correctly

Yes, you have tagged my correcty  ;)
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CO is worth monitoring only so that you can sound an alarm if the level exceeds a (very low) threshold. It has nothing to do with comfort - CO will kill you without making you feel uncomfortable.

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A CO alarm would be useful, but I wouldn't want to rely only on a home built solution for that.

Maybe the CO detection isn't very usefull for my goal...  :smiley-fat:
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If the reason for doing it is "Because I can", then that's fair enough of course.

My reason isn't only "Because I can", but i think that it could be an usefull part in a domotic project.
Think about a green house that can"understand" your needs, based by your preferences and, for example, the season, and adjust some environmental parameters (like temperature, etc) for make you feeling more comfortable. That was my main goal, I don't know if it has been already done.
This device is an important part of this main project that can help me developing a software that could do this (infact the main part is the software, not the hardware).
Now you can understand why i need to identify all the parameters i need to detect for recognize if a environment is comfortable.

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