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Topic: Robotics Starter Kit (Read 12839 times) previous topic - next topic

Hello,
This is my first post on the forums. I wanted to ask for some suggestions for a good robotics starter kit that I can use to understand how things work and something that would allow me to add things on down the road.
Can anyone here suggest a good platform or kit?

Thank you for your time.


Jantje

Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -

Thank you for the suggestion. Are there any kits out there that would serve as a good starter platform? Untimely I would like to build the initial robot then have the ability to add things on at a later date (other servos or sensors perhaps an arm). Just looking for something that I can build and add on to down the road.

Thank you.

MichaelMeissner

#3
Sep 26, 2012, 06:51 pm Last Edit: Sep 26, 2012, 06:54 pm by MichaelMeissner Reason: 1
The trouble is there is a lot of choice.  It depends on what you want the robot to do after being assembled, what you want to add to the robot later, what your skill level will be after building the kits, and what your budget is.

For example go to http://www.robotshop.com/robot-kits.html all see what tickles your fancy.  Or go to http://www.pololu.com/catalog/category/2.


The trouble is there is a lot of choice.  It depends on what you want the robot to do after being assembled, what you want to add to the robot later, what your skill level will be after building the kits, and what your budget is.

For example go to http://www.robotshop.com/robot-kits.html all see what tickles your fancy.  Or go to http://www.pololu.com/catalog/category/2.


HAHA Indeed there are far too many choices (and that is an awesome thing). I think what I would like to build first is something like this. The main attraction with this kit is that is it arduino based, and it seems that I can add on to it as my skills get better. I think at this point I am just overwhelmed at the choices.
The main goal with all this is for me to learn more about the arduino, and also learn more about controlling things in the real world. I figured building a robot would be the most fun way to do that.
After the robot is up and running I would love to add a sensor(s) to it or hook in a raspberry-pi. I'm really looking for something that acts as a platform that I can use to continue to learn.

o_lampe

Not sure, what the XBee shields could be used for? I would rather search for motors with encoders.
Unless you want to use the XBee shields for remote control or something.

The powersupply looks nice, seems to be a step-down converter instead of a linear vr.
It's not my fault when my Posts are full of Errors. This stupid autocorrection from my browser is set up for german grammar.

For those that are interested I decided to go with the DFRobotShop Rover V2 - Arduino Compatible Tracked Robot (XBee Kit)
http://www.robotshop.com/dfrobotshop-rover-tracked-robot-xbee-kit-4.html

The main reasons I went with this kit: Arduino based, and expandable. Once I get it up and running I am planning on adding a raspberry pi or pandaboard to it and see how far I can push it.

MichaelMeissner


For those that are interested I decided to go with the DFRobotShop Rover V2 - Arduino Compatible Tracked Robot (XBee Kit)
http://www.robotshop.com/dfrobotshop-rover-tracked-robot-xbee-kit-4.html

The main reasons I went with this kit: Arduino based, and expandable. Once I get it up and running I am planning on adding a raspberry pi or pandaboard to it and see how far I can push it.

Cool.  BTW, I just noticed that you live in Westford, MA.  I work in Westford, MA (at IBM) and live in Ayer, MA.  I haven't had much time to hack on electronics recently.


Not sure, what the XBee shields could be used for?

I would imagine you would use the XBee to send commands to the robot wirelessly from another Arduino or from a computer.  You obviously would still need appropriate controls for the motors, so I suspect the XBee is in addition to the motor controllers, not replacing them.



For those that are interested I decided to go with the DFRobotShop Rover V2 - Arduino Compatible Tracked Robot (XBee Kit)
http://www.robotshop.com/dfrobotshop-rover-tracked-robot-xbee-kit-4.html

The main reasons I went with this kit: Arduino based, and expandable. Once I get it up and running I am planning on adding a raspberry pi or pandaboard to it and see how far I can push it.

Cool.  BTW, I just noticed that you live in Westford, MA.  I work in Westford, MA (at IBM) and live in Ayer, MA.  I haven't had much time to hack on electronics recently.


Not sure, what the XBee shields could be used for?

I would imagine you would use the XBee to send commands to the robot wirelessly from another Arduino or from a computer.  You obviously would still need appropriate controls for the motors, so I suspect the XBee is in addition to the motor controllers, not replacing them.


Aye I noticed you live in MA as well. Nice to see a local on the boards! Some background on why I am getting into this. I started my first programming job about two years ago [C#] and now I want to learn more about C/C++. The best way for me to learn is to have fun with it so...

My plan with this kit going forward is as follows:

1. Get it up and running so it can respond to "WASD" commands. I went with the xBee kit for the reasons stated above. I would like to talk to the robot over wireless and see if there is a way to send commands in real time.

2. I would like to see what I can do with the robot once I give it an IP address

3. Add some sensors

4. Add a raspberry pi to the kit and see where that takes me.




MichaelMeissner


Aye I noticed you live in MA as well. Nice to see a local on the boards! Some background on why I am getting into this. I started my first programming job about two years ago [C#] and now I want to learn more about C/C++. The best way for me to learn is to have fun with it so...


That's the best way, is to get some project and keep on expanding it.


My plan with this kit going forward is as follows:

1. Get it up and running so it can respond to "WASD" commands. I went with the xBee kit for the reasons stated above. I would like to talk to the robot over wireless and see if there is a way to send commands in real time.

2. I would like to see what I can do with the robot once I give it an IP address

3. Add some sensors

4. Add a raspberry pi to the kit and see where that takes me.

I just booted my R-pi on Saturday for the first time, though I had had it for 2-3 months.  I only recently, I got an LCD that can do HDMI and needed to get USB power supplies that can supply at least 1 amp (most wall warts and computer USB ports only deliver 0.5 amps).  At present, I don't know what I'm going to do with it.

Most of my thoughts right now revolve around my steampunk camera (Olympus E-5 DSLR mounted inside of a custom box made to look like a 1930's field camera with bellows, and adding various things you find in modern cell phones, such as a compass, watch, and sextent to replicate a GPS unit).  My only real hack so far has been to hook up my telegraph key to fire the camera (when you press the shutter release key, it enables the auto focus, and when you release it, it fires the camera, because my E-5 is somewhat slow in auto focus when using live view).  I would like to add a servo to zoom the lens in and out, and make the unit wireless.  I also use the video out facility to a separate screen that ultimately I want to migrate to a wearable screen that mounts on my eyeglasses (unfortunately, the Arduino is somewhat limited in dealing with video, so this is straight composite video from the camera to screen).  I also am waiting for delivery of a robot finger, that at some point, I want to use to fire the camera.

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