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Topic: Arduino Due (released Oct 22, 2012) Compatibility (Read 34 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty

#35
Oct 04, 2012, 07:56 pm Last Edit: Oct 04, 2012, 07:58 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1


My fear is that too many begineers will choose a Due over a Uno based on their possible future requirements rather then picking the best board for their entry into this hobby. The experts will already know how to select the best board for each specific project or application, but too many begineers will 'over buy' based on the wrong reasons.

Lefty

I dunno, that assumes you expect people to have a different processor for each project.  I suspect a lot of hobbyists are like me, and only have a few processors (or just one), and then builds things to get a specific action and then tears it down, and goes on to the next project.  For example, on the UNO, I've bought several proto-shields so that I could keep the stuff wired up, but switch to the next project.

I see a lot of posts about people wanting to do video and audio on their embedded systems, so I don't think it is something you need to run an OS for.  I certainly have projects I want to do that involve video that are hard to do with Arduinos, and I'm certainly thinking that the Arms I just bought (teeny 3.0, radioblock, raspberry pi) might fill the bill.

Also, it sounds rather like the 'old' timers that complain about newbies having it so easy, and that everybody should go through the steps they did.  I started programming on IBM punch cards, but I don't expect kids starting out these days to go back to cards.


Ok, but lets focus a bit. What would be your recommendation to a newbie to the hobby (with little or no electronics or software experiance) as to which would be their best choice to enter the arduino world once the Due is in fact avalible. I vote Uno, you vote ?

Lefty

DuaneB

Hi,

I guess there will be a lot of frustrated beginners wrecking Dues.

As for applications for the Due, I have in mind a psuedo modular synth - lots of oscillators, wavetables, analog inputs, some sort of low tech interface and a simulated patch panel.

16 bit audio should be very fast in a 32 bit mcu leaving enough cpu to implement the connections in the simulated patch panel for real in software.

Duane B

MichaelMeissner


Ok, but lets focus a bit. What would be your recommendation to a newbie to the hobby (with little or no electronics or software experiance) as to which would be their best choice to enter the arduino world once the Due is in fact avalible. I vote Uno, you vote ?
Lefty

Right now (October 2012), the Uno.  However, I imagine by the January time frame, it would be probably be the Due.  There is a saying in parts of the US, that pioneers are the ones with arrows in their back, and anybody that buys a Due on day one is a pioneer.  But after the initial problems are sorted out, I see the current 8-bit chips going being more of a niche market.  Will it happen overnight?  Certainly not, but it will happen.

Jantje



Ok, but lets focus a bit. What would be your recommendation to a newbie to the hobby (with little or no electronics or software experiance) as to which would be their best choice to enter the arduino world once the Due is in fact avalible. I vote Uno, you vote ?
Lefty

Right now (October 2012), the Uno.  However, I imagine by the January time frame, it would be probably be the Due.  There is a saying in parts of the US, that pioneers are the ones with arrows in their back, and anybody that buys a Due on day one is a pioneer.  But after the initial problems are sorted out, I see the current 8-bit chips going being more of a niche market.  Will it happen overnight?  Certainly not, but it will happen.

I fully agree with this. Certainly for newbies the stabilized due will be the platform of choice. It just makes everything easier. For instance it takes away the problem of memory management for small projects. You can do some really bad coding and still have enough cpu left not to notice.
It just makes the start easier and the old farts like me will do the hard work on the small slow 8 bit chips.
At least that means I will have a job until I die ;-)
Best regards
Jantje
Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -

Graynomad

Here's a f'example.

I've been working on a framework that is basically a HAL like the Arduino (and does implement the Arduino functions) but has a lot more, such as string parsing, FIFOs etc.

Last I looked it was about 20k in size, a bit large for a Uno but no problems for a chip with a lot of flash. Now of course you don't have to go to an ARM to get a lot of flash, but with the smaller ARMs available for < $2 I just reckon it's easier to use them. Hopefully I can drop this code onto the Due when it arrives but it's not worth porting it to a Uno.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

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