Go Down

Topic: Arduino Due (released Oct 22, 2012) Compatibility (Read 34 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty

#45
Oct 05, 2012, 08:12 pm Last Edit: Oct 05, 2012, 08:14 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1



Ok, but lets focus a bit. What would be your recommendation to a newbie to the hobby (with little or no electronics or software experiance) as to which would be their best choice to enter the arduino world once the Due is in fact avalible. I vote Uno, you vote ?
Lefty

Right now (October 2012), the Uno.  However, I imagine by the January time frame, it would be probably be the Due.  There is a saying in parts of the US, that pioneers are the ones with arrows in their back, and anybody that buys a Due on day one is a pioneer.  But after the initial problems are sorted out, I see the current 8-bit chips going being more of a niche market.  Will it happen overnight?  Certainly not, but it will happen.

I fully agree with this. Certainly for newbies the stabilized due will be the platform of choice. It just makes everything easier. For instance it takes away the problem of memory management for small projects. You can do some really bad coding and still have enough cpu left not to notice.
It just makes the start easier and the old farts like me will do the hard work on the small slow 8 bit chips.
At least that means I will have a job until I die ;-)
Best regards
Jantje


I still say a begineer to electronics is better off starting with a Uno. One other reason would be the very wimpy output pins that ARM chips have, even driving a 20ma led will require a switching transistor making a learning lesson all that much more complex to build and understand. Most all tutorials showing interfacing to simple circuits will have to be revaluated to see if they are compatible with ARM output/input pin specs. I think the rather rugged I/O pins of the AVR 8 bitters work much to the favor of raw begineers. Keep pushing those Uno boards. I think many are focusing too much on what a ARM chip is better at, rather then also considering what a 328P chip is better at in context to someone first starting out building simple stuff to learn how electronics works.

Lefty

Jantje


... One other reason would be the very wimpy output pins that ARM chips have, even driving a 20ma led will require a switching transistor making a learning lesson all that much more complex to build and understand. ...

I wasn't aware of that. This is indeed a really strong point for the UNO.
Best regards
Jantje
Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -

Graynomad

I agree that a Uno is a better choice for a beginner who

a) won't be writing 10000 lines of code,
b) just needs to see a LED flashing and
c) will be following examples that will 99% be for a 5v Uno-style board with IO grunt.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

iyahdub

You think i can use a DUE on my project of a spaceship to go to the Moon ?!
PS- My Arduino UNO didnt had enough Sram ...
10 LET Loop=Infinite
20 GO TO 10

westfw

Quote
One problem with threads, is each thread needs its own stack space, and machines like the Arduino have rather limited memory setups.  I'm not sure Due will solve this.

I think the relevant number is the ratio of RAM size to thread state size (roughly, number of bytes of registers).  AVR is particularly weak here: 2048/32 = 64.  Due is about 96k/(4*16) = 1536, so that SHOULD be a lot better.

Quote
even driving a 20ma led will require a switching transistor

Or a driver chip.  OTOH, these days for a lot of apps you can just use a 1mA LED instead...

Go Up