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Topic: Using CST-1020 (Read 3 times) previous topic - next topic

Nunov

I've looking for more sensors like the one i'm using and i found tihis on: http://www.soselectronic.com/a_info/resource/a/pdf/AC1050.pdf.
It looks its almost the same and has a more detailed datasheet.

I have had a burden resistor at the output of the sensor to measure current, but if i use the value given for 100 ohm at the output it doesn't give even close to the right result. (I am measuring the current with another equipment.)
Does anyone have used this type of sensors?

RIDDICK

1.
how do u get a mainspower plug through that tiny hole?

2.
that sparkfun sensor can b integrated easier, i guess...
one just snaps it on the mains power line...

3.
possibly u just measure the reactive power?
i have no idea how that sensor works, when there r 2 wires with the same current (just the direction is the oposite)...
i think u should wait for the high voltage experts... they should b here within a day... :)
-Arne

Nunov


1.
how do u get a mainspower plug through that tiny hole?

2.
that sparkfun sensor can b integrated easier, i guess...
one just snaps it on the mains power line...

3.
possibly u just measure the reactive power?
i have no idea how that sensor works, when there r 2 wires with the same current (just the direction is the oposite)...
i think u should wait for the high voltage experts... they should b here within a day... :)

1.
I have a cable with a plug i can easily remove. I don't need the plug to go through the hole. I only attach it after the cable passing the hole.

2.
I think the basis of work are the same, but i have this one and it was rather expensive. I want to see if i understand it...

3.
I'm not measuring power. I'm just looking for the current. Only one of the cable go in the hole, otherwise the sensor would give zero Volts at the output.

RIDDICK

1.
ok - that sounds safe...

2.
i c

3.
ok - then it should work... how many measurements do u take? since it is AC, the voltage changes quite rapidly and strongly, i guess...
-Arne

Nunov


1.
ok - that sounds safe...

2.
i c

3.
ok - then it should work... how many measurements do u take? since it is AC, the voltage changes quite rapidly and strongly, i guess...

I'm looking to the current wave in an osciloscope at the current transformer terminals. I have 100 ohms conected to that terminals too (the burden resistance).
Then i take the rms value of the wave and after dividing by 0.097 (according to the datasheet) I should get the current value. It happens to give a greater value than it should.

In the osciloscope I get 0.42 V (rms at the burden resistance terminal) and after dividing by 0.097 i get  4.3 Amps, when i should get something like 2.63 Amps (a resistance with 1 kW )

I can't find any example on the web with this sensors. This is driving me crazy!!!!

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