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Topic: [SOLVED] Not in SYnc Message every-time I run a basic example sketch (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

pcfr33k

It was  a stupid question.  The hardware Serial to USB does not need a sketch to run separately sorry for the confusion.  It assigns a com port and works off the internally set serial protocol.

I just tried a Sparkfun USB to Serial TTL 5 volts and it worked no problem.

I think the Tx/Rx is mislabeled on this device link below because I revered them and finally got this to work with all of the great help.  I am very thankful for all your time and a lesson to be learned!!

retrolefty

#11
Oct 07, 2012, 06:14 am Last Edit: Oct 07, 2012, 06:17 am by retrolefty Reason: 1

It was  a stupid question.  The hardware Serial to USB does not need a sketch to run separately sorry for the confusion.  It assigns a com port and works off the internally set serial protocol.

I just tried a Sparkfun USB to Serial TTL 5 volts and it worked no problem.

I think the Tx/Rx is mislabeled on this device link below because I revered them and finally got this to work with all of the great help.  I am very thankful for all your time and a lesson to be learned!!


Yea, that is a trap most all of us have been bitten by at one time or another. There is no 'standard' on if you label a pin Tx that it is a output pin, it could be an input pin that wires to a signal that is 'transmitting' a signal. When you think about it every single wire signal has a transmitting side and a receiving side, but yet we use two wire comm links and expect labeling one Tx and the Rx to tell us all we need to know, wrong! The arduino standard for comm terminal labling is that the tx pin (arduino pin1) is outputting a voltage and the rx pin (arduino pin 0) is receiving a comm signal, but trust me not all vendors follow that same standard, as the many different USB TTL serial cables manufactures I've come across I've found both methods of labeling. Some times you have to wire Tx to TX and Rx to Rx, other times it's Tx to Rx and Rx to Tx. Even on the old 'official' RS-232 connector you don't know if a given connector is outputting on the Tx pin unless you know if that connector is wired up as the DTE end or the DCE end of a link. It was and is mess and I always ended up measuring for voltage to find out which signal was a 'outputter' or which was an 'inputter'. Spent decades wiring up serial links between different manufacures 'RS-232 compatable' ports, and it almost never went smoothly, both on the hardware side and the software side. But I was payed very well to be able to figure it out and get them working.  ;)

Lefty

little


i just bought a freeduino (arduino clone)...i uploaded the blink sketch it worked fine...but after that my pc is not recognizing my board...
the moment  i plug in the usb, a message appears usb device not recognized each time this error appears
[font=arial]avrdude:stk500_getsync(): not in sync:resp=0x00[/font]
specifications-
windows xp 32-bit sp2
freeduino (atmega8)

i guess theres some problem with the ftdi driver..
please i need help


danharley

I ran into the same problem and fixed it myself.

Turns out that the uploader was trying to communicate to the wrong serial port. The uploader was trying to communicate to com1 when my arduino uno was on com5 even though it was actually plugged to the USB port.

Everything works as documented now.

DCH II

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