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Topic: I'm not a troll but.... (Read 5462 times) previous topic - next topic

perkunas

After finishing my project that's been on going for 2 years this is what happened.
1) I had a heck of a time getting the IDE to work under Linux (gave up used windows)
2)Halfway through the program I found it impossible to multithread and multitask, something you want to do after your 1st blinky.
Oh sure you can write a state machine, or some other trick but that's not true multitasking, confusing totally impractical.
Tried the commercial software more of the same and impossible to figure out. The only other solution was occam-pi a great project, but seems like it gets little support and is in beta format. In fact from what I understand is that they are not even allowed to use the Arduino IDE.
So I dumped my arduino and got myself a netduino, I really had no choice, this arduino just wont work. Within a couple hours I had 16 things multithreading and tasking. It was like a dream come true, which makes you think why I wasted all that time on the arduino. Its also nice to have the faster processor, more memory, and to be able to write in C# or even Visual Basic, Oh ya it even cost less go figure.
Nothings perfect, but the product needs to work for you.


dxw00d

Quote
Nothings perfect, but the product needs to work for you.


No argument from me. If it works for you, then it's the right choice. The netduino's i/o is weaker though, which is one reason people stick with Arduinos.

retrolefty

And there are of course those Arduino users that understand the limits of what one can do with a 16MHz 8 bit processor with 2K or 8K of SRAM space and properly select projects that can be done within those limits. The fact that you have projects and applications needs that exceed what one can reasonable do with an Arduino is certainly not a reason to cast dispersions on the Arduino platform. One always needs to select the proper tools for the job. So grow up with the attitude thingee, if you selected the wrong tool for your projects then that was your error, not the fault of the Arduino.

Lefty 

perkunas

"The netduino's i/o is weaker though, which is one reason people stick with Arduinos."
How so, the pin layout is the same, are you saying the arduino is faster, maybe idk but a nanosecond here there shouldn't mater on most projects.
Also if your only concern is i/o then you have the wrong product, you should be using a phidget and not a microcontroller.



liudr

Right tool for the right job. You may be a c sharp wiz but everyone else is not. What was your project anyway?

magagna


"The netduino's i/o is weaker though, which is one reason people stick with Arduinos."
How so, the pin layout is the same, are you saying the arduino is faster, maybe idk but a nanosecond here there shouldn't mater on most projects.


I think he means "weaker" as in less power.  Arduino pins can drive up to 20 MA at 5V; the Netduino's pins are 3.3V and some of the analog pins can only do 2mA.
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/magagna <-- My last name.  Pretty apt.

dxw00d

#6
Oct 11, 2012, 08:53 am Last Edit: Oct 11, 2012, 08:59 am by dxw00d Reason: 1


"The netduino's i/o is weaker though, which is one reason people stick with Arduinos."
How so, the pin layout is the same, are you saying the arduino is faster, maybe idk but a nanosecond here there shouldn't mater on most projects.


I think he means "weaker" as in less power.  Arduino pins can drive up to 20 MA at 5V; the Netduino's pins are 3.3V and some of the analog pins can only do 2mA.


That's exactly what I meant.

Quote
Also if your only concern is i/o then you have the wrong product, you should be using a phidget and not a microcontroller.


Nonsense. If I want something permanently stuck to a PC, then a dumb device might be appropriate, but an Arduino can run standalone, and can better interface with other devices than the netduino.

I'm beginning to think your thread title might not be entirely true.

perkunas

"I think he means "weaker" as in less power.  Arduino pins can drive up to 20 MA at 5V; the Netduino's pins are 3.3V and some of the analog pins can only do 2mA"

That's only some what true, my pins run at 5v
(they are 5 volt compliant, but normally work at 3.3vdc)
I'm not sure, but I don't think you can do that with a analog pins.

"What was your project anyway"
It was a Hydroponic controller it had to control water, temp, PH, nutrients, Lights ect.
All at the same time ie. multitask (something arduino cant do)
"You may be a c sharp wiz but everyone else is not."
C# wizard, no hardly, but most programers use and like C#, so its easy to get the help you need,
and believe me I needed lots of it. Actually I like visual basic, its what most of us stared with as kids.
That's going to be fun to play with.



dxw00d

#8
Oct 11, 2012, 03:28 pm Last Edit: Oct 11, 2012, 03:41 pm by dxw00d Reason: 1
Quote
All at the same time ie. multitask (something arduino cant do)


You mean "something I wasn't able to make the Arduino do".

Try looking at what others are doing with Arduinos.

This aquarium controller is doing just as much as your project - http://www.marineaquariumsa.com/showthread.php?t=26372

GardenBot is an excellent modular system - http://gardenbot.org/about/

HydroBot does all yours does, and serves a pretty smart looking web interface to monitor and control it - http://www.cs.helsinki.fi/u/ljlukkar/hydrobot/

Boffin1

#9
Oct 11, 2012, 04:30 pm Last Edit: Oct 11, 2012, 05:56 pm by Boffin1 Reason: 1
Quote
It was a Hydroponic controller it had to control water, temp, PH, nutrients, Lights ect.
All at the same time ie. multitask (something arduino cant do)


This all sounds rather slower than reflexes required for landing a Mars probe :-)

Surely the plants can wait a couple of loops through the program to get their water or nutrients ?

AlxDroidDev


(...) One always needs to select the proper tools for the job. So grow up with the attitude thingee, if you selected the wrong tool for your projects then that was your error, not the fault of the Arduino.


Touché!

Well said, mate, and that is exactly the first thing that came to my mind when I read the OP.
Learn to live: Live to learn.
Showing off my work: http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,126197.0.html

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
but that's not true multitasking,

No you only get true multitasking with multiple cores which you don't have on a netduino.

Quote
some of the analog pins can only do 2mA"

That's only some what true, my pins run at 5v
(they are 5 volt compliant, but normally work at 3.3vdc)

You mean 5 volt tolerant not complaint, that only applies to when the pins are in input mode not output mode.

liudr


"What was your project anyway"
It was a Hydroponic controller it had to control water, temp, PH, nutrients, Lights ect.
All at the same time ie. multitask (something arduino cant do)
"You may be a c sharp wiz but everyone else is not."
C# wizard, no hardly, but most programers use and like C#, so its easy to get the help you need,
and believe me I needed lots of it. Actually I like visual basic, its what most of us stared with as kids.
That's going to be fun to play with.


You can certainly do this project with arduino but it's more of a personal preference to use or not to use multitasking libraries (I don't know if multitasking is supported by netduino hardware, such as task save-and-switch, privileges, memory protection etc.). You can easily use arduino to monitor all sensors and control all pumps if you want but you prefer the conceptual simplicity of multitasking. Fair enough.

Just a side comments of programmers being able to help, last time I helped my programmer friend fix his meat slicer, all the problem was that its fuse box was cheap and the cap fell out of the socket with the fuse and he didn't know or mentioned those were important parts of the machine. We opened the thing and tested every part and I traced the wire to a box and said, "Was there anything you didn't show me?" He then produced a couple of loose parts, being the cap and the fuse. Software and hardware people have been trained very differently. Despite that, I see good mix of both sides with arduino. You may be capable man/woman with hardware but you should hope your software people are too. Not long from now you will demand even more memory and faster processor speed since you do multitasking and visual basic, exactly what microsoft has been demanding.

JoeN

#13
Oct 11, 2012, 11:57 pm Last Edit: Oct 12, 2012, 12:01 am by JoeN Reason: 1
I'm wondering how the Netduino "even cost less" than an Arduino.  I have never see this.  It's $35 at both Amazon and Sparkfun.  Arduino R2 is still $22 at Amazon.

My day job is writing .NET code.  IMHO, one of the best things about the Arduino is that it doesn't run .NET.  I don't need that sort of heavyweight wrapper on this sort of device.
I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

Osgeld

agreed, .NET is nice on complex problems, it kicks you in the crotch and steals you wallet when you just want it to go from A to B doing something simple, like controlling a plant system.

I have to say, I dont get the problem here, theres no multitasking, your just writing more convoluted code thats going to be executed in order at the end of the day, just like a loop. Its nothing more than timesharing between program items.

if you like the netthingie great, but there is more than one tool in the shed, and they all have their benefits. I personally have an arsenal of controllers, and I am not going to use my 800Mhz Vortex86 to blink a LED, nor am I going to use my arduino as a image processor. 
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

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