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Topic: Arduino Powered Dust Collector Remote (Read 2186 times) previous topic - next topic

stevovee

Check out my dust collector remote made with arduino +NRF24LO1+ and Nordic fob

http://diyourfaceoff.com/diy-dust-collector-remote/

april

#1
Oct 29, 2012, 10:24 am Last Edit: Oct 29, 2012, 10:43 am by april Reason: 1
Great idea ,great work but it looks like your workshop is as good at collecting dust as mine is . I need a broom that sweeps where and when it is needed. No need to fly. Just a little magic dust please.

Can you explain what this actually does in bit values ? Say a byte of 8 bits like 11101010 What happens to it after flipping?

I saw in your code
Code: [Select]
// Print the ID of this message. Note that the message
// is sent 'big-endian', so we have to flip it.
printf("#%05u Buttons ",flip_endian(payload.id));


and
Code: [Select]
// Change a big-endian word into a little-endian
uint16_t flip_endian(uint16_t in)
{
uint16_t low = in >> 8;
uint16_t high = in << 8;

return high | low;
}

kg4wsv

Cool.  I thought about doing one of these, but realized it was a) still manual operation, and b) kinda silly to worry about wireless control of a machine that is already connected by a 4" diameter hose.

I designed an AC sense circuit that automatically turns on the DC whenever the table saw is on, and lets it run for a couple of minutes after the saw is powered down.

I'm keeping an eye out for powered gates so I can make it 100% automatic (I don't have enough DC to not use blast gates).

-j

stevovee

In reply to the question about the code.  I honestly have no idea what that part of the code means.  That part comes directly from the Nordic fob example on the RF24 Library by maniacbug


as far as the other comment goes.  I had originally considered doing this and even bought the AC  clamp over meter.  However after trying the remote its so easy to use I just decided to stick with it.  The problem is i have a number of large tools that i use and so i'd have to make sensors for each of them since I don't have a sub-panel in my shop.  If you had a sub panel for all of your big tools it would be very neat to just have the collector come on any time one of those tools is on.  Having the wireless is a pretty large benefit however because now i don't have to walk across the room, flip on the collector, walk back, make a small cut, walk back, turn the collector off.  I think I will leave some screw terminals for "smart" inputs when i make the custom pcb with everything on it so that it can be triggered by either a clamp meter or some other inputs if desired

kg4wsv

I decided to tap the tool power inside the tool, not at the panel.  Used an AC optosiolator (wired in parallel with the motor) into the arduino.  The DC power control (I used an SSR instead of a relay) and microcontroller live in a box on the DC.

I also left extra inputs - you won't regret it. :)

I added some ESD diodes, since I was running a pair of wires down 15' of hose that moves air at 1100CFM - could be some static, eh?

It's been running for a few years (the arduino-based circuit runs 24x7) with no problems at all.

cool project!

-j

stevovee

thanks, I'll make sure to add pictures when i make the custom board and enclosure setup. 

Bama5150


Cool.  I thought about doing one of these, but realized it was a) still manual operation, and b) kinda silly to worry about wireless control of a machine that is already connected by a 4" diameter hose.

I designed an AC sense circuit that automatically turns on the DC whenever the table saw is on, and lets it run for a couple of minutes after the saw is powered down.

I'm keeping an eye out for powered gates so I can make it 100% automatic (I don't have enough DC to not use blast gates).

-j




(sorry if im hijacking thread)
I was thinking of using an arduino to control a cheap dc powered door lock actuator, to create my own automatic blast gate. maybe with a a piezo vibration sensor or ac sense circuit. Do you believe this would be that tough to do?
thanks,
Jeremy

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