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Topic: Servo speed controlled by pot (Read 774 times) previous topic - next topic

Oct 21, 2012, 11:07 pm Last Edit: Oct 21, 2012, 11:09 pm by Arduinoprojects Reason: 1
Hello!

I'm about to buy a Aurduino Uno R3, breadboard, breadboard jumpers, servo and a potentiometer.

Now my question is..

-Is this enough to be able to controll a servo up and down via a written code program?
-Is this enough to be able to controll the speed of a servo?  Let's say the servo is moving up and down in a loop and while that's running I want to be able to controll the speed with a pot.

If not what do I need?

Sorry for my English..

Any help will be appriciated :)

retrolefty

Yes, that is enough. About the only thing I would add is a separate power source for the servo as many run into problems trying to power a servo from the arduino's 5V pin. Even four series connected AA batteries would be a better way to power a servo.

Lefty



Yes, that is enough. About the only thing I would add is a separate power source for the servo as many run into problems trying to power a servo from the arduino's 5V pin. Even four series connected AA batteries would be a better way to power a servo.

Lefty




Thanks!

But I thought that the 5v pin from the arduino should be enough to power it?

Is this a common problem?

And where/what to buy the external power source?

Edit : This won't be a problem since I have a cellphone charger that gives 5V just laying around somewere ;)

retrolefty

#3
Oct 21, 2012, 11:22 pm Last Edit: Oct 21, 2012, 11:24 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1


Yes, that is enough. About the only thing I would add is a separate power source for the servo as many run into problems trying to power a servo from the arduino's 5V pin. Even four series connected AA batteries would be a better way to power a servo.

How were planning on powering the arduino board? That may factor on the best/easiest was to power the servo independently from the arduino 5V pin.

Lefty




Thanks!

But I thought that the 5v pin from the arduino should be enough to power it?

Depends on servo model, mechanical load on servo, etc. Arduino is great at controlling a servo, not so great at powering them. If only using one servo with no mechanical load and it is a low current model then maybe you will get lucky. Try it and see, but if anything strange happens remember to then try powering it externally.

Is this a common problem?

Yes, people post all the time about trouble using servos with arduino, and often it's because they are not using an external power source for the servos.

And where/what to buy the external power source?

Servo's like +5vdc power (usually rated from 4.8 to 6vdc) and one amp of current per servo being powered is a good rule of thumb. Many sources of power modules and batteries are available, perhaps the same place you got the arduino?





Yes, that is enough. About the only thing I would add is a separate power source for the servo as many run into problems trying to power a servo from the arduino's 5V pin. Even four series connected AA batteries would be a better way to power a servo.

How were planning on powering the arduino board? That may factor on the best/easiest was to power the servo independently from the arduino 5V pin.

Lefty




Thanks!

But I thought that the 5v pin from the arduino should be enough to power it?

Depends on servo model, mechanical load on servo, etc. Arduino is great at controlling a servo, not so great at powering them. If only using one servo with no mechanical load and it is a low current model then maybe you will get lucky. Try it and see, but if anything strange happens remember to then try powering it externally.

Is this a common problem?

Yes, people post all the time about trouble using servos with arduino, and often it's because they are not using an external power source for the servos.

And where/what to buy the external power source?

Servo's like +5vdc power (usually rated from 4.8 to 6vdc) and one amp of current per servo being powered is a good rule of thumb. Many sources of power modules and batteries are available, perhaps the same place you got the arduino?




1AMP per servo?

Will a 5v cellphone charger work?

I'm not very good at electronics, I bought this to educate myself :P

The servo I got was a 10KG torque, so I think it's pretty powerfull, I see how that can give me problems when running of the aurduino.

retrolefty





Yes, that is enough. About the only thing I would add is a separate power source for the servo as many run into problems trying to power a servo from the arduino's 5V pin. Even four series connected AA batteries would be a better way to power a servo.

How were planning on powering the arduino board? That may factor on the best/easiest was to power the servo independently from the arduino 5V pin.

Lefty




Thanks!

But I thought that the 5v pin from the arduino should be enough to power it?

Depends on servo model, mechanical load on servo, etc. Arduino is great at controlling a servo, not so great at powering them. If only using one servo with no mechanical load and it is a low current model then maybe you will get lucky. Try it and see, but if anything strange happens remember to then try powering it externally.

Is this a common problem?

Yes, people post all the time about trouble using servos with arduino, and often it's because they are not using an external power source for the servos.

And where/what to buy the external power source?

Servo's like +5vdc power (usually rated from 4.8 to 6vdc) and one amp of current per servo being powered is a good rule of thumb. Many sources of power modules and batteries are available, perhaps the same place you got the arduino?




1AMP per servo?

Will a 5v cellphone charger work?

Yes for one servo, just be sure you also add a wire from the cellphone charger negative to a arduino ground pin as well as to the servo ground pin.

I'm not very good at electronics, I bought this to educate myself :P

The servo I got was a 10KG torque, so I think it's pretty powerfull, I see how that can give me problems when running of the aurduino.

That is probably it's maximum torque rating, the actual mechanical load attached to the servo will determine actual torque delivered and current demand values.


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