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Topic: Your router (Read 4 times) previous topic - next topic

bld

I just got my fiber connection today, and the bottleneck is now my router.

My current router is a 200 MHz Buffalo WHR-HP-G54-DD (with DD-WRT firmware), and is totally maxed out when I download.

The next project is then to transform a VIA EDEN into a router with pfSense on, and it should then be able to handle my connection. :)

Current result with my Buffalo WHR-HP-G54-DD


And now for the inspiration...

How do you handle your internet connection?
captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

EriSan500

As you, with pfSense for many years now. No need to mention that i'm very happy with it.

Greetings,
EriSan500

James C4S

Are you connected to your router through Ethernet or WiFi?
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

bld

CMiYC
Quote
Are you connected to your router through Ethernet or WiFi?

Ethernet (1gbit)

EriSan500
Quote
As you, with pfSense for many years now. No need to mention that i'm very happy with it.

What hardware are you using for it, and what installation did you select?

I am going to run mine from a CF card, and saw on their website that I should chose embedded then.
captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

EriSan500

I'm using an old PIII 1Ghz with 512Mb ram, HD install because i needed some of the packages. Hopefully I'll be upgrading that soon to an atom based mobo.

And yes, if you're going for the CF you need to choose the embedded one.

Greetings,
EriSan500

bld

I *think* my router is struggeling... ;D

captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

Ran Talbott

Quote
How do you handle your internet connection?


With patience:  if I need to download something like a Linux distro DVD,  I start the process and let it run in the background while I do something else for a couple of hours.

Probably has something to do with being able to remember when affordable 2400 baud modems were "an exciting new development"   :)


macegr

If the cable connection I have now (8Mb/1Mb) was merely RELIABLE I'd be more than happy with it. Of course it's a little better now that I went out to the box and tightened all the connectors, but Comcast still likes to have outages after midnight.
Unique RGB LED Modules and Arduino shields: http://www.macetech.com/store

bld

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Comcast still likes to have outages after midnight.

Isn't that something they do on purpose? I know a few who are getting disconnected every night just after midnight.
captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

pluggy

#9
Sep 04, 2010, 10:32 am Last Edit: Sep 04, 2010, 10:43 am by stephen_t Reason: 1
ISP supplied Wireless router, hooked up to a server (grandiose name for a Geode based 'computer' running Ubuntu) which acts as a secondary router and firewall.  I used to use firewall distros but found them too limited when you wanted them to do something they didn't do out of the box.   Like take pictures of your Elecricity and gas meters every 8 hours.





And keep an arduino on the straight and narrow :

http://pluggy.is-a-geek.com/arduino/index.html

I've used old desktop computers in my time as well, but the amount of electric they consume is depressing.........
http://pluggy.is-a-geek.com/index.html

macegr

Yes re: old computer consuming power. People talk about putting an old computer to work in your closet serving some minimal thing. "It's practically free!" But the type of old PC you find these days is costing you literally hundreds of dollars per year in power. If you actually want to save money then you need to find something relatively modern and low power to run your services. Thankfully, these days computer makers are actually addressing that market, instead of eking out the last cycle of performance. At the moment I'm bringing up a mini-ITX D510 Atom system that should run pretty much everything I need continuously and draw hopefully less than 40 watts. Don't have to worry about processing power for a long time and it's nowhere near as bulky or power hungry as, say, an old Athlon system.
Unique RGB LED Modules and Arduino shields: http://www.macetech.com/store

bld

I am going to use a VIA EDEN as router, it got a 700 mhz cpu, and draws about 9w. To run it I am going to use a new switchmode power supply that will only deliver the needed 12 and 5 volts.



Hopefully that will be as effective as possible.
captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

mowcius

#12
Sep 04, 2010, 01:39 pm Last Edit: Sep 04, 2010, 01:39 pm by mowcius Reason: 1
Quote
I am going to use a VIA EDEN as router, it got a 700 mhz cpu, and draws about 9w. To run it I am going to use a new switchmode power supply that will only deliver the needed 12 and 5 volts.

Well when I was looking into it, I think I found that for something low power, I would be looking at using a netbook. The original eeePCs used about 10W-15W or something similar but if you kept the screen off most of the time they would use quite a bit less. They are also 1.6Ghz with a nice built in UPS  ;D
You can pick them up rather cheap now.

Obviously not too great for a router though :D

Mowcius

bld

What I like about the EDEN is that it got two 100 Mbit directly on it's little board. :) Can't be much more compact.
captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

CowJam

Holy crap look at your upload!

I find my internets are more dependent on the time of day than the router.
- should be 50 down, 1.5 up but it's Saturday night (and I'm probably downloading something).

I use a d-link wireless-N router which I got free with the net connection, but everything except my laptop are wired because I think wireless is rubbish.

I have a QNAP NAS box that does downloading (torrents, newsgroup binaries), I have blu-ray player that plays hi-def movies and has no problem streaming a 13GB movie from the NAS box through the router while I'm busy farting about on the net.

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