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Topic: About the article "10 Ways to Destroy an Arduino" (Read 8 times) previous topic - next topic

fungus


From reports that I've seen, more people are abusing their AVRs and having them appear to survive (ie by driving LEDs directly with no current limiting resistors), than are having their AVRs die from momentary overloads.


Yep. AVR chips seem quite resilient to having their output pins shorted to ground. It's a good thing too, when you see the abuse they get (keep reading these forums for horror stories...)

Aside: I wonder if the designers knew this?

They even seem to survive being plugged into the socket backwards. Atmel didn't put the VCC/GND pins diagonally opposite each other - a common trick used to kill chips in the old days (eg. 74LS logic chips).

OTOH don't assume this is 'normal' for electronics. Many chips will die instantly at the slightest abuse.


No, I don't answer questions sent in private messages (but I do accept thank-you notes...)

MichaelMeissner


Yep. AVR chips seem quite resilient to having their output pins shorted to ground. It's a good thing too, when you see the abuse they get (keep reading these forums for horror stories...)

I wonder if we are going to see horror stories about people's new Dues being destroyed due them being less sensitive to abuse and because of the 3.3v vs. 5v issues.  Shorting out your first Due is a teachable moment, shorting out the second probably indicates whether you ignored the teachable moment.

pico


I wonder if we are going to see horror stories about people's new Dues being destroyed due them being less sensitive to abuse and because of the 3.3v vs. 5v issues.


I really can't see how it is reasonable to expect anything else.
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fungus



Yep. AVR chips seem quite resilient to having their output pins shorted to ground. It's a good thing too, when you see the abuse they get (keep reading these forums for horror stories...)

I wonder if we are going to see horror stories about people's new Dues being destroyed


If the Raspberry Pi forums are anything to go by, it won't be pretty.


Shorting out your first Due is a teachable moment, shorting out the second probably indicates whether you ignored the teachable moment.


The Leonardos too, there's no $3 quick repair for them...
No, I don't answer questions sent in private messages (but I do accept thank-you notes...)

jwatte

When will we see a RuggeDue? :-)

Also, a RuggedyPi would be cool, I guess. Although for the Pi, you really want to just use a separate board for the I/O, and that can have the protection on it.

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