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Topic: About the article "10 Ways to Destroy an Arduino" (Read 8 times) previous topic - next topic

CarlW


I'm just curious.  What are you trying to demonstrate precisely?


Hobby is fixing up pachinko machines and re-selling them.
Don't want to burn a house down with LEDs...

This video is slightly closer to end result...

http://youtu.be/SgMpPKOaBpc

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
need someone who's willing to donate an old Arduino board, and actually pull out the test equipment, and just actually what extremes starting with pin current,

The only way to assess damage is to slice the chip and look at the wiring and substrate with an electron microscope. That is what the manufacturers do when an important high volume customer has a problem. This almost always shows damage to the relevant part of the circuit. They then either reduce the recommended operating conditions or do something to the design. The latter is very very rare.

There will always be a bit of margin they add and a tolerance from device to device so pushing beyond what the data sheet says is possible, but it dosn't make it any the less a very stupid moronic thing to do.

Far-seeker


There will always be a bit of margin they add and a tolerance from device to device so pushing beyond what the data sheet says is possible, but it dosn't make it any the less a very stupid moronic thing to do.


This is one of the most important things to keep in mind while reading datasheets.  While primarily informative documents; they also serve a role as marketing documents, specifically to designers and engineers.  Both purposes have no room for humility, every aspect of the part the manufacturer believes relevant to its use will be included.  About the only reason a component would capable of reliable performance of some type beyond what is written in the datasheet is that the manufacturer didn't bother to test that particular case.  This last point is why the "name brands" of the electronics industry tend to have longer datasheets with more performance charts and greater information about potential applications, they simply can afford to run more validation testing.  However, no matter who made the component they would not intentionally downplay or neglect any potential positive aspect of its performance.   

MarkT


besides,


11. drop it in the sea
12. give it a child under 5
13. leaving it accidentally in the oven
14. leaving it out in a storm with lightning in the area

any more he missed from that article? lol


15. trying to measure the temperature inside a microwave oven ;)
[ I won't respond to messages, use the forum please ]

John_S

I'm sure I've divided by zero a couple times, but this never happened  :(
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZ7pUADoo58


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