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Topic: Weather Station and Solar tracker (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

Graynomad

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will be in my backyard,

So it's no problem to adjust the angle every month or so, then you don't need to automate the second axis, fun to do but no necessary.

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Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

MrGarak

I'm making a similar project, but without the wireless part. I really wanted wireless but the climate here just won't allow it. It can stay below freezing for months in the winter and I know even with a SLA battery I'd have power issues in that kind of prolonged cold. Plus, the sun can disappear for weeks here. Therefore I ended up running 100ft of cat5 to my outdoor sensor station, and dropping the clock rate for the sensor communication, given capacitance issues and such caused by the long cable.

I'd also be careful about program memory. Mine disappeared fast when adding an ethernet shield and code to communicate with the multiple sensors, and I had to upgrade to a mega, which I am waiting to arrive before continuing my project. You might want to just get one of those instead of the uno and save the trouble of running out of space.

PaulS

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I really wanted wireless but the climate here just won't allow it. It can stay below freezing for months in the winter and I know even with a SLA battery I'd have power issues in that kind of prolonged cold. Plus, the sun can disappear for weeks here.

I'm sorry, but I had to laugh at this. What useful data are you going to get that visual observations can't provide? It's damned dark out there, is the same when you look outside or you look at your weather station.

It's too damned cold out there is the same whether confirmed by the weather station or not.

Not that I'm making fun of your efforts, or plights, but collecting data about a situation that you can control seems reasonable. Collecting temperature data when it has been too damned cold to go outside for the last 6 weeks doesn't strike me as useful.

MrGarak

Umm, some people do like actual data. Otherwise, there wouldn't be a market for weather stations at all, nor would there be ASOS stations all over the country.

scottyjr

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The guy in the video used 3 photo resistors and calculated difference between the center and each one on the side.


I tried this method but found that the all photocells are not created equal in that their resistances are not uniform under the same light levels thus if one photocell had more light hitting it, it could still have a higher resistance than one with less light hitting it. I thought of mapping the ranges of each photocell to values of say 1 to 10 but then came across a method which makes it 'obvious' which direction is lighter or darker. It's done by placing a tall light barrier between two photocells (e.g. vertical barrier between the two photocells used for east-west). If the two photocells are not directly facing the light source, one of the two photocells will be in the shade of the barrier, making the difference in resistance between the two 'obvious'. The inherent differences in resistance between the two photocells under the same light source can be ignored by throwing away any values that are relatively close and only paying attention to values that greatly differ.

- Scotty

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