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Topic: Need to power 7.4V servo with wall wart through breadboard (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

mightcouldb1

Thank you guys once again for the valuable information.

After reading what you've written as well as consulting some other sources, I think that the best option for me is using a voltage regulator, heat sink, and a 9V wallwart.

A couple more questions if I may:

Since I will be using a voltage regulator and capacitors for a circuit that I would normally build out on a breadboard but can't since I should't run 3 Amps through one, how can I build out this circuit?  I.E. Do I need to solder everything together on some kind of conductive material?

How are screw terminals used?

When you mention connecting the servo's ground and power directly to the power source, how would that work with multiple servos?  What if I am using a voltage regulator?  Also, shouldn't I have the ground from the Arduino, my breadboard circuit, and the ground from the servos connected?

Thank you for your help!

mightcouldb1

Ok... So I am actually deciding to go with analog servos now because I've realized that the current draw is more manageable for my current application.  Also they are much cheaper.  :)

The servos will probably be drawing 300mA max.

The regulated power supply I'm looking at is a 6V 3.5A.  If I understand correctly, the 3.5A is the max current draw.  So if I have two servos drawing 600mA total at any point, I should be ok connecting these to a breadboard since I will probably never draw more than that.  Correct?  Any risk of current spikes greater than 1A melting my poor breadboard?

Or is it good practice to still hook these up directly to my power supply?

Thanks again!  Almost got it all figured out!


DVDdoug

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Ok... So I am actually deciding to go with analog servos now because I've realized that the current draw is more manageable for my current application.  Also they are much cheaper. 

The servos will probably be drawing 300mA max.
They will also have less torque/mehcanical power.  I hope that's OK...   Sometimes it's hard to calculate and you don't know 'till you try.  I have a project in mind (that I won't start for awhile) and the load is going to be balanced, so there is almost no constant-force required by the servo.  But, it's going to require torque to start/stop the thing.   I could probably dig out my physics/dynamics books, re-learn some stuff, and make some calculations based on the mass & acceleration, but I'm just going to buy a small motor, cross my fingers, and see what happens! :D

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The regulated power supply I'm looking at is a 6V 3.5A.  If I understand correctly, the 3.5A is the max current draw.
Right...  That's the maximum you should draw from the power supply.  You won't be stressing it at 600mA.

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So if I have two servos drawing 600mA total at any point, I should be ok connecting these to a breadboard since I will probably never draw more than that.  Correct?  Any risk of current spikes greater than 1A melting my poor breadboard?
Like I said...  I don't know what the ratings are.  You'll probably bo OK.  What's the worst that can happen?  :D  A "spike" doesn't generate much heat, since it takes a few seconds for heat to build up.

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Or is it good practice to still hook these up directly to my power supply?
Yeah... I'd say it's good prectice, but if it's more convenient to run the power through the breadboard, I go-ahead and give it a try!


mightcouldb1

OK great!  Thanks so much for your help.  I'll post when I finish the project in a couple weeks :)

Good luck with yours!
Jason

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